Tag Archives: boulder

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Brittany Jaros, Boulder, “Mission: Suicide Prevention”

Jaros_Brittany

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a presentation about suicide prevention for middle school aged students at two Catholic middle schools, Holy Trinity and St. Louis. Along with the presentation, I had the kids participate in a workshop where they put their sources of strength on a posterboard and we hung them around the school. I also created a website, http: wix.com/hope-strength to help spread my work to others. I also handed out stickers with the Sources of Strength wheel with my website domain on the back. The Sources of Strength wheel included family support, positive friends, mentors, healthy activities, generosity, spirituality, medical access, and mental health. Experts say if you have at least two of these sources of strength you will reduce your risk of experiencing depression and/or suicide.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I gave the kids an evaluation sheet asking them specific questions about the project and how I can change it. Most of the responses were positive and indicated the kids learned new things from my project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The posters will continue to hang up around the schools. One of the teachers, Tate Hallahan at Holy Trinity, agreed to integrate an aspect of my project into a daily activity. The kids normally do a Life Balance Program called 4-7-40, Four Aspects of Human Awareness (Physical, Spiritual, Mental, Emotional) 7 – Seven Goals – Specific and Attainable / Pertain to the 4 Aspects. Before my project the activity was 3-7-40. He added the mental aspect after I came to the school. Also, he took the stickers I handed out with my website domain to handout to his students in the future. The kids will also continue to visit my website.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I emailed four organizations: Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, National Association of France-Depression, European Depression Organization, and Mental Health of America. Lori Salgado from the Board of Directors with DBSA Colorado responded and encouraged me about my project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I have the strength to persevere through any difficulties and I can finish anything I set my mind too. I discovered I am a good leader and I love working with middle school students.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Standing up in front of people and discussing a tough topic. I also learned to be brave and stand up for a topic I believe in even when others don’t see it as important . This will help me in the future when I have to give presentations in the business world and I’m comfortable with public speaking. I will also have the confidence to stand up for issues in the community and the world and address them.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

It was the final project and endpoint of my journey as a younger Girl Scout. It has given me the helpful tools to continue Girl Scouts in the future. It helped me to achieve the final leadership tools I need to succeed in college, the business world, and as a future Girl Scout. Without these final tools I would not be as confident in myself before I enter the world.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award – Where are they now?

1. Tell us about yourself.

My name is Jessica Hild and I earned my Girl Scout Gold Award in February 2015. I am now eighteen years old, live in Boulder, Colorado, and study Integrative Physiology at the University of Colorado. I am going to college on a Naval ROTC scholarship, so most of my time is taken up by classes and training with my unit but I also enjoy running and yoga. I play violin in the campus orchestra, and am involved in an outdoor skills group. I got started in Girl Scouts when I was about seven years old and was in a troop until high school then I transitioned into a Juliette. I also joined Venture scouting when I was fourteen. Balancing both Girl Scouts and Venture scouts turned out to be very beneficial and I’m glad I participated in both.

2. What was the most successful part of your Gold Award experience?

My Gold Award project was done at the outdoor chapel of Camp Alexander; a Boy Scout camp I worked at for four years. I had unforgettable and impactful experiences throughout my time there. Being able to successfully make an impact on a place that means so much to me, and does so much for youth, was extremely satisfying. I feel that pairing my involvement with the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts was something that made my Gold Award project unique.

3. How do you feel your Gold Award experience has impacted who you are today?

Ever since my older sister got her Gold Award, I decided I wanted to get mine as well. I thought of it as something I could put on college applications or my resume. After I received the Award, I realized it meant much, much more. I was working under time constraints when planning my project but I am so glad I went forward with it anyway. Why not go after opportunities? Getting my Gold Award has reinforced that pursuing things when given the opportunity can open up doors for success.  

4. What is your advice for girls interested in pursuing their Gold Award?

I had my project approval meeting less than a week before I scheduled my project date. I put in a lot of work knowing that it may not be approved. I decided that regardless of the decision, this project was worthwhile and I would go forward with it as a Gold Award project or not. After my project was approved, I shared this with the board and received nothing but support of doing what I felt was right.

Pursuing the Gold Award is an incredibly worthwhile endeavor. I encourage any girl interested to go for it regardless of the challenges and to pick a project they are passionate about. The process may develop skills such as organization, research, communication, or budgeting, but I believe it’s really about realizing what an impactful and powerful woman one can be.

Troop 2651 earns Bronze award for blind skier map of Eldora Mountain Resort

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Submitted by Karen Lochhead

Boulder

Northern and Northeastern Colorado

Troop 2651 has earned their Bronze Award! At one meeting we had a visit from our blind friend Amelia who talked to us about what it is like to be blind. Amelia is an amazing person, and skis at Eldora even though she is blind! We decided to make a map for her and the other blind skiers from the Colorado Center for the Blind who ski with the Ignite Program.

We first printed out a topographical map of Eldora and used that to cut out different layers of cardboard. Then, we stacked up the cardboard, glued it together, and covered the structure in plaster to make the runs smooth. Then we added trees and chair lifts to help the blind students envision the area.

We drove up to Eldora to present our map to the blind students. Each of us showed them a different feature of the map. Once we were done presenting, we got to ski and see the blind students we had just met skiing with their instructors.

CCB invited us to come down for a visit. We got a tour led by a blind teacher, met a professor who read us Harry Potter in braille, and we got to present our map to a classroom full of blind students.

During our adventure, we got to learn the meaning of the badges Power of One, Power of Team, and Power of Community. We look forward to earning our Silver and Gold awards in the years to come!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Outdoor Skills Camps coming soon – Register Now!

Outdoor Skills Day Camps

Back by popular demand!

An annual favorite event for Girl Scouts is coming back – Outdoor Skills Day camps are being hosted in Longmont, Thornton and Boulder.

Who: 1st Graders and up
When: 9:45am—3:45pm  after Scouts Own (exact times will be sent)
On Sale Price/Girl: $16 includes hot Sat. lunch and Outdoor Skills patch
Adults: free up to required ratios—(1 adult: 4 Brownies or 1 adult: 6 Juniors or 1 adult: 10 Cadettes)
Additional adults: $5/day
Event Maximum: Up to 100 girls (register early). Bring a friend.

Sample of Outdoor Skills to Learn and Improve

  • Knife Craft and Safety
  • Knot Tying
  • Compass Use
  • Outdoor Cooking
  • Fire Building and Campsite Set-up / Tent Pitching
  • Emergency First Aid and Preparation

Each girl will earn ‘Outdoor Skills’ patch.

Brownies/Juniors/Cadettes may do activities that are part of other awards.
Each girl should bring a washed/peeled veggie for the lunch Stone Soup. Come with your troop or on your own.
Please register NOW: https://sites.google.com/site/gsoutdoorskillsdayscolorado/

Questions to:  girlscouttroop70007@gmail.com

Girl Scout Senior/Ambassador Troop 70007 is running this event to help Girl Scouts learn Outdoor Skills and as a fundraiser for their big summer trip to California.

Date Registration and Payment Deadline Location
Sat Feb 28 Feb 24 United Methodist Church, 350 11th Avenue, Longmont, CO 80501
Sat Mar 7 Mar 3 Good Shepherd UMC, 3690 East 128th Avenue, Thornton, Colorado 80241
Sat Mar 14 Mar 10 Mountain View United Methodist Church, 355 Ponca Place, Boulder, Co 80303

 

Download Outdoor Skills Day Camps Flyer 2015 final.pdf

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Mattie McGarey, Louisville, “Love Every Inch”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I started a blog dedicated to aiding those recovering from eating disorders and the education of those who wanted to learn more about eating disorders. This lead to me giving a talk at Boulder High School’s body positive club about my project.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I decided to pursue this issue because I have seen eating disorders do terrible things to the lives of my friends. Adolescent girls heading to college are the most prone to developing eating disorders at such a stressful time in their lives and I thought that this project would be a great way to guide my peers into to this time of change. I am also a dancer and have seen eating disorders very present in the dance world, so I also wanted to explore and educate those who were close to me through dance about this issue.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

I was able to educate others on how to recognize signs of eating disorders as well as offer support and resources to those suffering from them.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I was able to gain skills and experience dealing with real world issues that I would not have been able to experience without completing the Gold Award. I not only learned leadership, planning, and goal setting skills, but I also learned interview techniques and how to network amongst a group of people who could help me in achieving my goals.

How did you make your project sustainable? 

The blog that I created, loveveryinch.weebly.com, will exist forever and the Boulder High Body Positive club that I spoke at remains active.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

Eating disorders are a widespread issue, not just in America, but around the world. Being able to start an open conversation about eating disorders in Boulder will hopefully lead to a more in-depth exploration of this issue in other places.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I think my most memorable experience was getting the chance to talk to a club of people my age who were dedicated to body positivity.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Being able to have experience leading a project and completing one’s goals are important skills to have in one’s life. Besides developing communication and networking skills, I am able to have a piece of work proving that I am driven and hardworking when it comes to things I believe in.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I was able to take initiative of a project that I felt passionately about and I was able to take all of the leadership skills that I had learned throughout my time in Girl Scouts and apply them by myself.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Nina Asher, Greenwood Village, “Gates Summer Camp Hike”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Took inner-city Denver kids at the Boys and Girls Club on an education hike up near Boulder, CO.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I wanted to take the opportunity to make a positive impact on the kids at the Boys and Girls Club.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

I was able to teach the children about a topic they never would have learned about otherwise.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I became a better leader and more comfortable leading others. I was in charge of a group of counselors, who were older than I was, and I was forced to learn to interact and lead a group of people I was unfamiliar with leading.

How did you make your project sustainable?

I created a Hike Manual that will be passed down from summer to summer at the camp. It is for the counselors to use and teach from. Along with that, I created a Hike Activity Book for the campers to keep them engaged in what was being taught.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

Wherever these kids go in their life they always will keep the knowledge they learned at camp. This information will help them in many aspects including respecting nature and staying safe in circumstances of natural disasters common to Colorado.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The most fond memory I have about my Gold Award project is working with the kids at Gates Camp and getting to interact and teach the children.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

This experience has taught me many things, but most importantly, about teaching children and what a difficult, but rewarding task that can be. In the future, I will keep the skills I learned from this project and apply them when I hopefully become a teacher.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is a culmination of all my hard work over the years. Over everything I have learned when I was Brownie up to doing the actual project, everything I did lead up to my project and prepared me for that as well as for the rest of my life.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Bronze, Silver and Gold Celebrated at Boulder Highest Awards Ceremony

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(More photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/sets/72157644118952800/ )

More than a hundred Girl Scout family and friends gathered in Boulder on May 4 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver or Gold Award.

Six girls were presented with the Gold Award, the highest award a Girl Scout in grades 9-12 can earn. Girls who have earned this award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. Several Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4-5 can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented with their awards. during Sunday’s ceremony, emceed by Annie Davis, a 2013 Gold Awardee from Boulder.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

Emily Calzolari, Caitlyn Danielle Fitch, Ailee C. Rowe, Rowan Alaina Seabolt, Alexa Jo Stringer and Monica Teagan Weller spent a few minutes describing their Gold Award projects and how working toward Gold impacted their lives.

Emily, of Longmont, provided helmets for the Longmont Ice Pavilion and educated Learn-to-Skate parents and participants of the dangers of skating.

Caitlyn, from Northglenn, taught self-defense classes for girls and boys between the ages of 6 and 18 to promote the value of confidence in everyday life.

Ailee, of Westminster, designed and instituted a program in the local homeless shelter system to stimulate brain activity when the kids were not at school.

Rowan, from Westminster, created a summer horse camp program for children in the community who might not have the resources to have such an experience to explore the world around them and develop their passions.

Alexa, of Lafayette, wrote a curriculum and ran a counseling group for middle-school aged girls to raise self-esteem.

Monica, from Westminster, planned and participated in monthly events alongside Rotary Youth International Exchange students to help them make friends and experience all of the fun and culture of Colorado.

In addition at the ceremony, Curtis Stringer (Gold Awardee Alexa’s father) was presented with one of GSUSA’s top volunteer awards, The Honor Pin, for his outstanding work as a cookie volunteer. The award recognizes an individual’s exemplary service in support of delivering the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE) which has had measurable impact on two or more geographic areas of service, allowing the council to reach and surpass its mission-delivery goals.

The ceremony culminated with a bridging ceremony for all of the Girl Scouts present who were “bridging” or progressing to the next level of Girl Scouting.

We are immensely proud of these inspiring young leaders in our community.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Taylor Hale, Boulder, “Music on the Brain”

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Taylor Hale
Boulder
Niwot High School
Music on the Brain

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I provided some relief to Alzheimer’s patients through my therapeutic music program, which also offered company to these lonely nursing home residents.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

Music has the potential to unlock otherwise lost memories for Alzheimer’s patients and temporarily relieve cognitive and behavioral symptoms. I plan to study neuroscience in college and this was a great introduction to mental illnesses and treatment.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

I provided therapeutic music sessions and a person to talk to for the residents. In the future, my project will mostly have the impact of education about the benefits of similar projects via the project’s blog and newspaper article.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I improved my communication skills and gained self-confidence in situations outside of my comfort zone.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will remember the people and the experiences I had at the home. The residents were some of the sweetest people I have ever met, and I am glad I was able to talk to them and hear their stories.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Going into college as a pre-med/neuroscience major and having this background with mental illness reminds me why what I want to do is so important and has the potential to impact so many people.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think that my Gold Award serves as a capstone to my Girl Scout experience. I was able to do my own project, specifically in my own area of interest. It also served as a transition project from high school into college.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Alexa Stringer, Boulder/Lafayette, “Free to be You”

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Alexa Stringer
Boulder/Lafayette
Fairview High School
Free to be You

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I wrote curriculum for and ran a counseling group for middle-school aged girls to raise self-esteem. My group provided peer support and resources to help improve body image and general self-esteem as well as how to rise above the images the social media suggests.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I pursued this project because insecurity is an issue many young girls experience and struggle with. In my project I wanted to help girls who deal with insecurities about themselves. My goal was that this group of girls will go on to help create a generation of adolescents who do not struggle with issues that hinder their relationships with themselves and others and help create a society where they are celebrated, not beaten down.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

The main impact my project made was the education of adolescents and providing the tools and resources necessary to be successful. I believe that after the group’s last session, girls became continually more aware that they were in control of their life. They gained knowledge of how to deal with stressful situations, unhealthy relationships, and how to better themselves and help others. One of the participants wrote on her evaluation that she was so glad she participated in the group and that she was considering taking on a project of her own along the lines of my curriculum. To hear that was so cool for me because that’s when I really knew for sure that I made an impact on these girls and they would be passing it on to their community.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

Through my project, I have gained countless useful skills. One of the most important, though, was problem-solving. I feel that I learned how to encounter and overcome obstacles very well during my project. I also drastically improved my communication skills through this group. I had to learn to advocate for myself when I needed something instead of trying to take everything on by myself. The helpful skills I developed in running this group have since come to use in many situations in my daily life.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I think the thing I’ll remember most will be the girls’ reactions. It was really cool for me to see how much their opinion of themselves really changed throughout the group and how it positively affected their relationships with themselves and their families and friends. When I presented my Gold Award project to my peers, it was really cool for me to see that people were interested in my project and what I did. In addition, seeing how many of my peers reacted positively to my project made me feel like I had more power to
make a change.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

My project really gave me some good experience and a great start in psychology, which is what I plan to get my degree in at Colorado State University this fall. I learned a lot about working with others and how to overcome issues I may come across.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Not only did it teach me to be organized and manage my time well, my project really showed me what I can do when I set my mind to something. I learned how powerful I can be with my words and leadership and how big of an impact I can make. Since the group has ended, I also feel more connected to my community. I have never really interacted much with anyone too far apart in age than me, but this group helped me connect with some younger girls and see the world through their perspective.