Tag Archives: badges

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Staying Fit badge Part One of Five

For the week of May 4, 2020, GSCO Outreach Program Coordinator Amanda is going to help Girl Scout Juniors earn their Staying Fit badge! Watch this video for an introduction to the badge. Step One is to start moving and here are two videos to help you do just that:

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadettes and Poetry – SNAZZY!

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Cadette Troop 54538 explored poetry as part of the Outdoor Art Apprentice badge. At our virtual meeting, we each shared a haiku poem that we wrote with inspiration from nature. (Such risk-takers – sometimes it’s hard to share your creations/writing with others!)
We moved from haiku to creating a kind of cumulative poem together.

The form of this poem is called Exquisite Corpse. (Innovators because we adapted this to a virtual meeting format – we are realizing that so many things are easier when you can be in the same room with someone!)

There were no rules, just some guidelines to get us going and get inspired. Since the badge is Outdoor Art Apprentice, we started where we each had one line relating to nature. Line Two had a flower reference. Line Three was a line where a sound appeared and we finished with Line Four where we wrote something that made us think differently about our flower line or something that makes our flower line change or become untrue.

Here’s our poem. We titled it SNAZZY!

Time in the sunshine is grand.
There is a chill outside.
The cold is bitter to me.
Winter is when I thrive.
Springtime is my favorite season.

Tulips, Tulips everywhere!
Roses in vases
Roses blooming outside
The pedals are red.
Columbines popping up everywhere!

The buzzing of the bees fly through the air.
Birds chirping in the brisk air.
Tweet Tweet skitter the birds
Waves waving in the water.
The wind whooshes around.

Snow, don’t garnish the red tulips!
Thrones and Roses
I can feel the pokes as I pick the roses
Seasons changing, changing when they bloom like stars in the sky!

~Catherine, Elizabeth, Jacey, Tayla

As go-getters and innovators, we thought some families might like to do a family poem. If you want, you can follow some of our guidelines and ideas!

Family poem idea:  Write a line on a piece of paper and pass it around for everyone to add on. Line one is spontaneous, whatever you want. Be inspired by the person before you.

Line Two refers to fun things outdoors.

Line Three refers to flowers.

Line Four refers to your favorite food.

Line Five refers to something about nature.

Line Six makes you think positive about camping!

Share your fun creation with others to brighten their day!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Brownie Painting badge Part Four of Four

 

Brownies can earn their Painting badge at home thanks to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team! We started by getting inspired and learning how to make an art journal. To help you fulfill Step Two (Paint the Real World) and Step Four (Paint Without Brushes), we made an aspen resist painting. In Step Three, we painted a mood. Now, we are going to tackle the last step of this badge, Step Five. Watch this video to learn how to make chalk mural. If you don’t have sidewalk chalk available, don’t worry. You can spend some time planning out your mural for a future date!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Brownie Painting badge Part Three of Four

Brownies can earn their Painting badge at home thanks to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team! We started by getting inspired and learning how to make an art journal. To help you fulfill Step Two (Paint the Real World) and Step Four (Paint Without Brushes), we made an aspen resist painting. For Step Three, we are going to paint a mood.

Materials:

  • Paint
  • Brushes
  • Paper for your mood painting, scrap paper for experimenting, other materials to make marks with (optional)

For Step Three of earning the Brownie Painting badge, we’re going to paint like an abstract artist. What is abstract art? Abstract art refers to paintings, sculptures, and other art media that portray art that is not meant to look like something we can recognize—it is based on something we can feel and not something we can see. Abstract artists create works of art that express feelings, moods, and ideas through artistic elements such as line, shape, and color.

Line.

The strokes you make with your brush can be big or small, thin or thick, or long or short. Think of how you can express a mood in line—how can you use your brushstrokes to express what you are feeling?

Experiment with different brushstrokes on a piece of paper. Try making as many different lines as you can think of. You can also experiment with Step Four of this badge and make marks without using a traditional paintbrush. Try using a piece of string or yarn instead of a paintbrush.

Shape

How might shapes express emotion? Maybe, happiness could be many small circles, like bubbles? Maybe, anger could be big, spikey blobs? What shape would represent how you are feeling today?

After experimenting with lines, experiment with shapes. What different shapes can you make? You can splatter paint on your paper, or drip paint on your paper and blow it around with a straw.

Color

Artists, authors, and other creatives often use color to describe or portray certain moods. How can you use color in your painting to express a mood? Think about your favorite color and how it makes you feel. What about your least favorite color—how does it make you feel?

Experiment with mixing different colors—warm, cool, and neutral. Make swatches of your colors on a sheet of paper. Which colors are you most drawn to? How do they make you feel?

Look at these paintings by abstract artists:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/29/arts/design/review-helen-frankenthaler-abstract-climates-provincetown.html

https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/women-in-abstract-expressionism-636611

How do you feel when you look at them? What do you think they were feeling when they created them? How have they used line, shape, and color in their paintings?

For my mood painting, I decided to paint a piece depicting anger and fear since things have been kind of scary. Art is a great way to express yourself if you are feeling difficult feelings. Here is my finished painting, plus some pictures of how my painting progressed over time.

I started with painting my background and when it was dry. I dropped paint onto my paper and blew it into different shapes using a straw. Then I added some different colored lines around my blobs of paint.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Brownie Painting badge Part Two of Four

Brownies can earn their Painting badge at home thanks to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team! We started by getting inspired and learning how to make an art journal. To help you fulfill Step Two (Paint the Real World) and Step Four (Paint Without Brushes), we’re going to teach you how to make an aspen resist painting. You can also watch a video to help you complete these steps of the badge.

Materials:

  • Paper
  • Paint and Palette/Plate
  • “Found” Paintbrushes (anything you choose to use as a paintbrush)
    • Cotton Swabs
    • Cotton Balls
    • Makeup Sponge
  • Yarn/String/Twine/Ribbon (6 pieces, each 12 inches long)
  • Tape
  • Pen/Marker/Pencil

Directions:

  1. Collect all of your materials and find a clean workspace.

  1. Tape your pieces of string/twine to the paper. The string will be blocking out the trunks of your aspen trees. So, if you want thin trunks, only use one piece of twine per tree. If you want thicker trunks, use two pieces of twine together.

  1. Once you’ve finished taping out your aspen trunks, it is time to paint!
    1. Take your found paintbrush and begin dabbing paint onto the paper. Dab all around the yarn, being careful not to move the yarn around as you paint.
    2. You want the blank spaces to remain under where the yarn is, as those will be the trunks of your aspen trees.

  1. You can use the same found paintbrush object (like a cotton ball or makeup sponge) for painting different colors. This will help with the color blending. You can also experiment with different types of found paintbrushes.

  1. Once you have finished painting, wait for the paint to dry for a little bit. Then, carefully un-tape and remove the yarn from the paper.

  1. Finally, draw details onto the tree trunks using a pen or marker. This is how you can make the white spaces left by the twine really look like aspen trees.

  1. Hang your finished painting somewhere prominent!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Brownie Painting badge Part One of Four

 

Brownies can earn their Painting badge at home thanks to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team! Let’s start by getting inspired.

Option One: Take an Art Walk Through Your Home

Art can be found anywhere, including in your home! Get inspired by the art you walk by every day, but don’t always have the time to stop and appreciate.

Materials:

  • Blank piece of paper
  • Scissors
  • Pens/Pencils/Markers

Directions:

  1. Make a simple “art journal” to record your observations about the art that you find around your house. Watch our “how to” video for step-by-step instructions for making your own “art journal.”
  2. Look for any art that is hanging on the walls of your home.
  3. Discover art that might be sitting on shelves or tables.
  4. Check hallways, bedrooms, on the outside of the refrigerator, and even in bathrooms for any art you might have missed.
  5. Write down your observations about the art that you find. Here are some questions to get you started:
    1. Are there paintings? Photographs? Drawings? Sculptures?
    2. Are the artists who created these works famous or are they members of your family?
    3. Where in your house is most of the art located? Is it all a specific type or style of art?

Bonus: Draw an “art map” that shows the locations of some art in your house.

Option Two: Explore Two Virtual Art Museums

Did you know that you can explore some of the most famous museums in the world from the comfort of your couch? You can even explore art made by other kids! The International Museum of Children’s Art in Oslo, Norway is just one of many museums which you can visit virtually.

  1. Use a blank piece of paper as a simple “art journal” in which you can record your thoughts and observations! Watch our “how to” video for step-by-step instructions for making your own “art journal.”
  2. With your caregiver’s permission and after taking the Girl Scout Internet Safety Pledge, go online and virtually tour two amazing art museums.
  3. In your art journal, you can:
    1. Sketch some of your favorite pieces that you see during your tour, or
    2. Try to answer questions like: Which museum is your favorite? Do you have a favorite painter? What type of artistic movement do they belong to?

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Cadette Trees badge Part Five of Five

In honor of Earth Day, this week (April 20 – 24, 2020) Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is helping Cadettes earn their Trees badge at home. For Step One, we designed a treehouse. In Step Two, we dug into the amazing science of trees. We made a creative project starring trees for Step Three. We explored the connection between people and trees for Step Four. For the last part, Step Five, we are going to learn how to help trees thrive.

You can take action by planting a tree or helping to tend to an existing tree in a yard or park (make sure to ask permission and practice social distancing). Several organizations allow you to apply for a free tree to plant. However, since most have received a high volume of applications this year, free trees are hard to come by. Check with the National Wildlife Federation in August 2020 when applications may reopen. You can also do a web search for local tree programs in your area. If you get your hands on a tree to plant, make sure you research how best to plant and care for it. Arborday.org has lots of free guides and resources available. If you can’t find a tree to plant, watch our video to learn how to care for an existing tree.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Cadette Trees badge Part Four of Five

In honor of Earth Day, this week (April 20 – 24, 2020) Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is helping Cadettes earn their Trees badge at home. For Step One, we designed a treehouse. In Step Two, we dug into the amazing science of trees. We made a creative project starring trees for Step Three. We’re now going to explore the connection between people and trees for Step Four.

We’ll start by doing a little research! With your caregiver’s permission and after taking the Girl Scout Internet Safety Pledge, go online and pick a topic. You could choose to learn about logging, clear-cutting, or deforestation. Why do humans cut down trees? What are the pros and cons for people? For the trees? Prepare as if you were planning to debate both sides. Get started with these resources:

Or, you could choose to research trees and gardening. What trees work well in gardens and why? Think about your dream garden. What trees would you include? Check out these websites for ideas on how to design a tree garden layout, and get to work designing your own garden:

Here’s our example of a dream tree garden!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Cadette Trees badge Part Three of Five

Happy Earth Day! This week (April 20 – 24, 2020), Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is helping Cadettes earn their Trees badge at home. For Step One, we designed a treehouse. In Step Two, we dug into the amazing science of trees. Moving on to Step Three, let’s make a creative project starring trees!

For this part of the badge, you have options! Pick one, or if you’re feeling really inspired, do both.

Make leaf art. Watch this video to see how to make a wax paper leaf pressing. Or, use this link to learn how to create simple painted leaf prints: https://www.growingajeweledrose.com/2019/08/leaf-painting-for-kids_28.html

OR

 

Make a tree ring autobiography. The way you can tell certain things about a tree’s life year-by-year is through its rings. This is called dendrochronology. Taking inspiration from a tree’s cross-section and its rings, chronicle your life in the rings of a tree. Starting from the middle of the circle at the smallest ring, write down the first thing about yourself or the first thing you can remember (your birth year, where you were born, parents’ names, etc.). As you move out into the larger circles, fill out each ring with moments, people, memories, places, and personality traits for those times. For example, your second ring could be Kindergarten through second grade and could include your friends from that time, favorite things, where you lived, etc. The furthermost ring should be your most recent year or two, or could be things you wish to do/see/accomplish in the future. See the example below for inspiration! You can print out our template or draw your own.

Cadette Trees- Part 3- Tree Ring Template

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Animal Habitats badge Part Four of Four

Girl Scout Juniors can earn their Animal Habitats badge at home– thanks to Girl Scouts Colorado’s Outreach Program team! Be sure to check out all of our videos and blogs to learn more about where animals live, how they play, and how humans can help them. Step One was to find out about wild animals. In Step Two, Girl Scouts investigated an animal habitat. For Step Three, we created an animal house. Step Four had us exploring endangered habitats. Step Five, the last step of this badge, is to help protect animal habitats! In this video, we will learn about solitary bees, their importance to humans, and how we can help improve their local habitats by creating a bee bath and/or a bee nest.

For the bee bath, you will need:

  • A shallow dish
  • Smooth rocks or marbles
  • Water

For the bee nest, you will need:

  • A clean, empty plastic bottle
  • Paper grocery bag
  • Scissors
  • Tape or glue
  • String
  • A ruler
  • Pen or pencil

To learn more about solitary bees in Colorado, check out this fact sheet (https://extension.colostate.edu/docs/pubs/insect/05615.pdf) from Colorado State University.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story her