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Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step Three of Five

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

Step Two: Make Decisions in a Group

Step Three: Explore Civil Debate

A debate is a discussion between two people who have different opinions on any given topic. It is important to know how to draw on facts and logic to support your point of view. It is essential to stay calm. Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, “Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade,” and the point of a debate is to persuade others to your point of view. A great way to persuade others is to keep an open mind their point of view and to find common ground!

Choose one or more of the following activities

Watch candidates for elected office debate. It could be for any office – from your local school board to the U.S. Presidency. After the debate, discuss with your Cadette troop or your family the arguments on all sides, and whether the candidates found any common ground – or whether they were even looking. Where the candidates persuasive? Why or why not?

OR

Understand a famous debate in history. It might be a debate over the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s, or between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas in the 1860s. Find out why the debate was important to American history and who is considered the winner and why? Did the debaters find any common ground? Did they look?

In the next step, you will learn to understand how to compromise.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step Two of Five

 

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

Step Two: Make Decisions in a Group

In this step, you will need to work in a group. It could be planning and running your next Cadette meeting online; planning, shopping for, and cooking dinner with your family; or doing a big house project. The key goal is to make at least six decisions together as a group, such as when, where, and what you’ll eat; what you will accomplish in your meeting; who is responsible for which aspects of the project. Afterwards, discuss how the common-ground strategy you discovered in Step One affected your group’s ability to make decisions. Were compromises made for the good of the whole group? Did you trade for something you really wanted? How do you think the common-ground strategy would work at the local government level? At the state level? In Congress?

Decision Making Strategies

Majority Rules: Ask the members of your group their top three options. Write down the two most popular, and then have the group vote. The choice with the most votes wins.

Consensus or compromise: You really want to try a new Moroccan recipe. Your mom would rather a tried-and-true Mexican favorite. You could put a new spin on an old recipe, or agree that this time you’ll make the favorite and next time you’ll branch out. You both like Chinese food. Could you have chosen this instead? Discuss the options with your group until you’ve reached a decision everyone is happy with.

Pick at random: Make a numbered list with everyone’s choice. Roll a dice to choose one at random. You can also draw names out of a hat, flip a coin, or draw straws.

Use one or more of the methods above to help you make decisions in your group project.

In the next step, you will be exploring civil debate.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step One of Five

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

The best way to learn to find common ground with others is to learn that we have more similarities than differences. By learning about perspectives that are different from ours, we will find that our priorities are often in line with each other, even if we have different ways of approaching them.

Do one or more of the following activities to learn about how others see the world.

Difference of Background

Have a conversation with someone from a different country, state, or town who lives in your community in right now. Ask them about their journey, and the reason for their move. Ask them what their life was like before the move, and what their life is like now.  What aspects are the same, and what is different? Share with them your favorite parts of your neighborhood, to help them feel at home.

OR

Difference of Belief

Learn about someone who has a different belief system than you do. Maybe, you have a friend from school who practices a different religion than you do, and you can attend an online service. Maybe, you can interview the youth leader of an interfaith alliance.  Maybe, there’s a member of your family who has the opposite political leanings than your household. Have a respectful discussion about your similarities and differences.

OR

Difference of Opinion

Everyone has differences of opinions. Find a friend whose favorite food is something you can’t stand, or who won’t watch your favorite TV show. Have a discussion about their likes and dislikes, and your likes and dislikes. Try their favorite food, and have them try yours while you have a watch party of each other’s favorite shows. Share at least two things you liked about the other’s favorites.

Up nesxt, learn how to make decisions in a group.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Senior Sky Badge: Step Five of Five

The sky is a masterpiece. Every day it graces us with living art, whether through a glorious sunset, shifting cloud formations, or the stunning display of night stars. No wonder we take every opportunity to spend time outdoors. Girl Scout Seniors can earn their Sky badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program.

Create a Moon Phase Wall Hanging

Check out this link to learn about the moon’s eight phases.

Supplies Needed:

  • String (enough for eight pieces, PLUS one longer one to hang)
  • Sick/Dowel Rod to tie the moon phases onto
  • Paper/Cardstock/Scrapbook Paper/Thin Cardboard from the recycle bin
  • Scissors
  • Glue/ Glue Stick
  • Markers/Crayons/Paint/Nail Polish to decorate your moons
  • OPTIONAL: Washi Tape or colorful yarn or embroidery floss to wrap around the stick for decoration. You may also want to add beads to the hanging strings.

Making the moon phase wall hanging:

  1. Draw and cut out the moons
    • Fold paper/ cardstock/ scrapbook paper/ thin cardboard in half.
    • Draw out eight circles onto your folded paper using a pencil and an empty tp-roll or any circle shape that is the size you want for your moons. Using the same template, draw over one of the two of the circles to make two crescent moons, then draw over two more to make the gibbous moons. 
    • Cut the moons out- to start, fold your paper in half if you didn’t do so before drawing the moon templates. You will have two of each moon phase that you will glue together (16** total). As you are cutting, keep those that you cut together ,so that when you glue them they fit together easily.
  2. PRE-CUT eight hanging string/ twine/ yarn for your wall hanging. Make sure you cut an extra two to allow for tying onto the stick and for ½”-3/4” to be glued in between the moons. They can be all one length, or you may choose to cut them varying lengths so that the moons will hang at graduating positions across the hanger stick. For this example, I cut my strings at graduating lengths and then played around with their positioning on the stick, so they’d all be a little bit different once the project was finished. 
  3. Place glue across the surface of your moons. On one side, add a little bigger glob of glue for the string. Put the string on the glue glob before pressing the two sides together to sandwich the string in between the two pieces. 
  4. Tie the strings onto the stick or wooden dowel rod.
  5. Once all the moon phases are tied on, add the “hanger string” onto the dowel tying it on either end of your stick. 
  6. Hang your beautiful finished project on a door, wall or in your garden.                                                              

**Optional: IF you prefer a smaller wall hanging you can choose a smaller stick and hang only some of the moon’s phases on it. For example, make one crescent and one gibbous moon to represent both the waxing and waning of these two phases and one quarter moon to represent both the first and last quarter moons. 

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Senior Sky Badge: Step Three of Five

The sky is a masterpiece. Every day it graces us with living art, whether through a glorious sunset, shifting cloud formations, or the stunning display of night stars. No wonder we take every opportunity to spend time outdoors. Girl Scout Seniors can earn their Sky badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program.

Step One: Watch the Skies

Step Two: Investigate the Science of the Skies

Step Three: Explore the Connection Between People and Flight

We have two fun videos to help you complete this step!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Senior Behind the Ballot Badge Step Four of Five

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a few years, you will be 18-years-old and able to vote. It is also a presidential election year, and a year in which Colorado chooses a new U.S. Senator, and all the seats we hold in the House of Representatives are on the ballot as well. In American history, women and 18-year-olds have not always had the right to vote (or run as a candidate for office), but now they do, and you will. It will not only be your right to vote, but a wonderful way to honor the women who fought for our right to vote in every election. Voting is also the best (and easiest) way to tell the government where you stand on the issues and whom you think is best able to make decisions that will affect you and your sister Girl Scouts. In the Senior Behind the Ballot Badge, we will explore the way people get elected to office, and the importance of voting both here at home and around the world.

Step One: Find out more about elections

Step Two: Investigate the Ins and Outs of Voting

Step Three: Get Out the Vote

Step Four: Plan a Campaign

Let’s take a look at what it takes to attract voters. Do one or more of the following activities.

Create a sample campaign budget. We are about to head into election season and elections cost money. Find out how campaign money is spent by creating your own sample budget.  Include the costs for polling and travel, staff salaries, and don’t forget the buttons, bumper stickers and lawn signs! TV and radio ad costs differ depending on region. Take a look at the Federal Election Commission’s website to see how much your local representative raised and spent and take that into account when creating your budget.

OR

Create a campaign ad. Most people these days are tired of seeing the same old campaign ads on TV. Take a look at three different ads from three recent elections. Are the ads negative or positive? Truthful or misleading? Do they feature the candidate, or their opponent, or someone else? Make your own ad, one that’s not like any that are on TV these days. Keep in mind the following: Who are you trying to attract?  Young voters, new voters, voters from a different background? Don’t forget your campaign slogan!

OR

Find a platform and write a speech. Every campaign begins and ends with a speech. Read or watch campaign speeches by three winning candidates. What do they care about? What do they want to protect by seeking office? Do they use clichés or slogans in their speech? Decide what you care about and why other people should, and write a passionate speech as if you are running for a local office or student council.

Share your work on the GSCO Blog, or on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Brownie Bugs Badge Part Four of Four

 

 

 

 

 

Earn the Brownie Bugs badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program team! When girls earn this badge, they will explore the world of bugs and learn more about these little creatures that do so much.

For Step Four, you are going to explore bug homes! Watch this video for a fun activity to do just that.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Brownie Bugs Badge Part Three of Four

Earn the Brownie Bugs badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program team! When girls earn this badge, they will explore the world of bugs and learn more about these little creatures that do so much.

For Steps Three and Five, you are going to see bugs in action and take a bug field trip! Watch this video and then go on a bug scavenger hunt! For your scavenger hunt, you can make your own board or use this one.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouts at Home: Brownie Bugs Badge Part Two of Four

Earn the Brownie Bugs badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program team! When girls earn this badge, they will explore the world of bugs and learn more about these little creatures that do so much.

Step One was to draw a bug poster. For Step Two, try a bug craft. Watch each of these videos to decide which one you would like to try.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Collage Artist Badge Part Three of Five

Earn the Senior Collage Artist badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program team! This badge is an opportunity make art as unique as you are, so get ready to see the creative possibility in everyday objects.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.