Tag Archives: Aurora

Aurora Girl Scouts share the holiday spirit

Submitted by Rebecca Lipman

Metro Denver

Aurora

The Jays Service Unit in Aurora celebrated the holidays with a party and caroling at the Garden Plaza of Aurora Senior Living Center on Sunday, December 11. Garden Plaza gives the Jays SU free meeting space for our monthly Service Unit meetings. We were excited to be able to get to know some of the residents and strengthen this community partnership.

More than 30 Girl Scouts did crafts and played holiday games with the residents of the independent living center before going to the assisted living center to sing carols for the residents that could not attend the party.

It was wonderful to see members of different generations connect and to share some holiday joy!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

11 Colorado Girl Scouts earn Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts

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11 Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the Gold Award, the highest award in Girl Scouts.

  • Emma Albertoni from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, took action after noticing that many of her peers lacked financial literacy. She wrote a curriculum that will be implemented in her school and proposed to the Jefferson County School Board to add a required Financial Literacy class.
  • Megan Beaudoin from Monument, St. Mary’s High School, created a ten-minute video for middle school students to help ease the transition to high school. Topics covered included: academics, social interactions, and self-esteem.
  • Megan Burnett from Colorado Springs, James Irwin Charter High School,worked with community leaders and businesses to build a softball practice field at the school. The project would have cost the school $25,000.
  • Michayla Cassano from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created a memorial to recognize the sacrifices made by women who have served in the military.
  • Kelsey Collins from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a curriculum to teach preschool and elementary school children about park safety and Colorado history.
  • Carissa Flores from Westminster, Broomfield High School, shared her knowledge and passion for Taekwondo by creating, coordinating, and leading self-defense seminars for children, teens, and adults.
  • Baily Holsinger from Larkspur, Castle View High School, not only crocheted hundreds of beanies for newborn babies at Denver Health Medical Center and Baby Haven in Fort Collins, she also held classes to teach people of all ages how to make the beanies.
  • Kathleen Otto from Fort Collins, Fossil Ridge High School, worked to increase awareness for dyslexia by hosting a viewing of “The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia” and leading a panel discussion afterwards.
  • Daniell Plomodon from Erie, Niwot High School, organized several “Disability for a Day” presentations to educate others about living with a disability. Activities included: trying to button a shirt while wearing mittens, playing patty cake while wearing Vaseline covered glasses, and using person first language.
  • Anastasia Rosen from Fort Collins, Rocky Mountain High School, created a workshop to educate others about human trafficking, tactics recruiters use, and how to prevent it.
  • Debra Zerr from Arvada addressed the problem of the lack of connection between the military and general public. Through a series of events, she worked to educate the public about the importance of the military and the men and women who serve.

These young women have demonstrated exceptional commitment to taking action to make their world a better place. By earning their Gold Award now, these Girl Scouts will also be part of this spring’s celebration of Girl Scouts’ highest honor. Since 1916, Girl Scouts have been making meaningful, sustainable change in their communities and around the world.

The Girl Scout Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kelsey Collins, Aurora, “Colorado History and Park Safety”

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What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my project I created my own curriculum to teach preschool and elementary school children about park safety and Colorado history. I worked alongside the Ecopark in southeast Aurora to develop ideas and determine important information to include, such as flood safety. I taught at a couple schools and at a Brownie Field Day to share my information.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

To measure the impact of my project, I created a trivia game to play with the kids that I taught. I had questions ranging from what were the Indian tribes in Colorado to the proper steps to take if there is a storm forming while you are at a park to judge if the kids had learned any of the information.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

The Centennial Youth Corp will be helping take over my project to make it sustainable. I shared all of my materials with this group of high school students so that they will be able to teach kids together and set up booths at city events to share the information I have created.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I shared my materials with parks across the state and nation so that they can provide these activities and coloring sheets in their information centers. I even contacted the Yellowstone Board of Education and my materials are currently under review there.

What did you learn about yourself?

I am very capable of being a leader, as everyone is, when it comes to doing something that you are passionate about. I realized that I am quite capable of procrastination, but when there is a will there is always a way to finish the project. I can accomplish anything I set my mind to.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think this award helped me establish my own leadership skills that I will carry into the future. After doing this 80 hour project with some help from my family and friends I realized that there are always people I can count on to help me through the more difficult aspects of my life, but that I am also able to do anything I want to with my life.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

The Gold Award is a good culmination of the whole Girl Scout experience. By completing this project, I feel like I have followed through and completed the mission of Girl Scouts. It established a lot of leadership skills and reliability in me, and I am glad to say that I have earned the highest honor in this organization.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Scouting for the Cure

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Submitted by Wendy Anderson

Denver Metro

Aurora

Susan G. Komen Colorado in conjunction with Juniper Trail Girl Scouts Service Unit were thrilled to bring Scouting for the Cure back to Colorado! About 80 girls along with their adult partners gathered at Grandview High School in Aurora October 7, 2016 for this educational breast health event.

Volunteers from DU Cheerleading squad lead the girls in cheerleading to encourage girls to get regular physical exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. A healthy lifestyle may prevent certain diseases including cancer.

Volunteers from Susan G. Komen taught the attendees about the importance of regular breast exams and early detection of breast cancer at a station where they made bracelets with beads representing different sized lumps. Each attendee was able to keep a bracelet as her own reminder of the importance of regular breast exams. Participants were also able to make a bracelet to donate to Susan G. Komen that will be used to educate other women about breast health!

A big thank you to HealthONE doctors and nurses for coming out to share even more breast health info! Girls were able to assemble packets of information to share with other women in their lives, participants practiced finding lumps on models, and learned about the importance of mammograms. They saw mammogram images and were able to talk with a radiologist about what she looks for when reading a mammogram. Meeting women doctors, nurses, and pharmacists from our area will hopefully encourage more girls to choose STEM careers that will lead to ending breast cancer forever!

The evening wrapped up with a special presentation by Charlotte Talbert, Juliette Low actress. She taught everyone about Juliette Low’s life. October is a special time for Girl Scouts as we celebrate Juliette Low’s birthday. It is also breast cancer awareness month. Did you know Juliette Low died from breast cancer? Through modern medical advances and arming our girls and women with knowledge about breast cancer, we can increase breast cancer survival rates and save lives. Juliette Low would definitely want that for her Girl Scouts.

Thank you to all who participated this year. We hope to bring Scouting for the Cure to other areas in the future. If you would like to get involved, please contact girlscoutwendy@gmail.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

A Girl Scout truly LIVING by the Girl Scout Law

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Submitted by Colleen Trapp

Metro Denver

Aurora

My daughter Elizabeth is in Troop 64257 in Aurora. Elizabeth has a twin brother, Joel, who has special needs. There’s a girl in her troop, Emily, who truly epitomizes what it means to be a Girl Scout. Emily always treats Joel with such dignity and respect. When you read the Girl Scout Law, you know that she TRULY takes it to heart and is leading by example. Today, after I picked up Joel from school, we were waiting for his sister to come out and he lit up when he saw Emily. Emily checked to make sure it was safe to cross the street, walked over to the car, and gave Joel a big hug, MADE HIS DAY! With so many kids being bullied, Emily is a strong leader and really shows how to treat others!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Scout Night at the Denver Zoo

Submitted by Charon Dyer

Metro Denver

Aurora

Girl Scout Troop 60287 got together and attended the Scout Night at the Denver Zoo where we watched hula dancers, painted our own faces, learned about water pollution, and much much more. This event is a great one for scouts from all walks of life!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Power Up your troop in time for Bully Prevention Month

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Submitted by Caroline Cornell

Metro Denver

Aurora

Ambassador Troop 2879 invites you to join them at one of their fall Power Up events scheduled for southeast metro Denver. Power Up is a girl-led course that trains girls how to recognize and stop bullying when they see it. It’s focused on the kinds of bullying that girls do most: excluding, ignoring, gossiping, and drama. Participants will explore:

• Who has the Power in relationships?

• The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of friendships.

• How to Change their World by figuring out what roles are played in girl dramas and how you can be more than a bystander when girls are teased or left out.

Adult leaders and chaperones will mix with the girls for lunch and some programming during the day, but have their own, separate program too.

It’s a great way to start off your Girl Scout year right!

Date Program Level Registration Link

September 11, 2016 Junior https://power-up-9-11-2016.cheddarup.com/

September 24, 2016 Junior https://power-up-9-24-2016.cheddarup.com/

October 9, 2016 Cadette https://power-up-10-9-2016.cheddarup.com/

January 14, 2017 Junior & Cadette https://power-up-1-14-17.cheddarup.com/

All programs are from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and are held in the Conference Center at Parker Adventist Hospital. Cost is $15 per girl and $10 per adult, including two healthy snacks.

Want to learn more about Power Up, but can’t make one of these dates? Sign up for the Power Up: Clique Proofing Your Troop session at the Leadership Summit on October 1, 2016 for a preview.

Have group and a space? We can travel to you! Please email us at Troop2879@gmail.com to ask about our availability to come to your venue.

Girl Scout Synchronized Swimming Day

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Submitted by Julie Romney

Denver Metro

Aurora

Who wants to join these cute synchronized swimmers and learn the OLYMPIC sport of SYNCHRO! Have your girls been watching the Olympics and are ready to dive in and try it!!?? Rocky Mountain Splash is hosting their 11th annual Girl Scout Synchro Day on September 10, 2016 from 1:30-4:30 p.m. (at Range View High School in Aurora). This fun filled afternoon will give your Girl Scout an opportunity to MEET an Olympic Synchro swimmer, learn a routine in the water with our nationally ranked synchro team, discover the secret how synchronized swimmers keep their hair perfect in the water, and even get their hair and make-up done just like the Olympians! For just $25, you get three hours of fun, a healthy snack and a fun patch! Space is limited to the first 50 girls! Register now at njromney@gmail.com.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Lauren McBeth, Aurora, “House of Words in Tierra Park”

 

Lauren McBeth

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my project I built a Little Free Library for Tierra. The library can be used by anyone who wants to read. The goal for my project was to encourage people of all ages to read more.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Within one week of planting the library, there were new books and all the Dr. Seuss books were gone. I have also received responses from people on the Facebook page I created.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

The Aurora Libraries is committed to working with the Aurora Parks and Recreation District for the security of the “House of Words in Tierra Park”. The Interact Club (High School Rotary) at Cherokee Trail High School has committed to checking and restocking the house quarterly.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection

Nationally, I will be connecting through the House of Words in Tierra Park Facebook page and the Little Free Library organization registration and map of world-wide locations.  Globally, I will be traveling to three countries via Girl Scouts and will visit a local library in London where I will place books with my Facebook connection and leave bookmarks with the links to the Facebook page “House of Words in Tierra Park” and the “Little Free Library” site.

What did you learn about yourself?

Without a commitment to Girl Scouts I might not have learned the strength and tenacity it takes to survive challenges.

I also learned that I am smart, strong, able to organize and direct others, I am sensitive to the needs of my community, able to adapt to challenges, and perfectly capable of making the world a better place. I am proud to represent the Girl Scouts of Colorado.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I am currently nominated to the United States Naval Academy and while I wait to hear about a future with the Academy, I know that the Gold Award allowed me to truly embody the meaning of serving others. This will always be carried forward.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts for 12 years now and I have had many opportunities through Girl Scouts. The Gold Award was a great way to wrap up my Girl Scout experience because I was able to use all that I have learned in Girl Scouts in my project. Also, finishing my senior year out with my Gold Award Project has meant a lot because I was able to give back to a community that has given me so much.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org