Tag Archives: Aurora

What’s the big deal about volunteer recognitions?

Submitted by Caroline Cornell

Metro Denver

Aurora

Are you up for a quest?  My challenge to each service unit across Colorado is to find your outstanding volunteer for 2017/18 and nominate her (or him) for an adult recognition award.  It’s an easy process and will make a world of difference when you celebrate your success.  The deadline for submission is March 31, 2018.

Why bother recognizing our volunteers?

In a perfect world, girls would remember to thank their troop leaders every year on Leader Appreciation Day (pssst – it’s April 22).  To celebrate, parents might help their daughter write her troop leader a special note.  Or, bring her a small surprise like a plant or some homemade cupcakes.  But wait, who tells girls and their parents that it’s Leader Appreciation Day?  Yep, that’s the trap most of us fall into.  The reality is, troop leaders don’t.  Because it just feels weird.

I GET IT. We’re all volunteers.  We’re not in it for the recognition.  We don’t need a t-shirt.  We come back year after year to experience the satisfaction of watching a girl grow from a timid Daisy to a confident and strong Gold Award Girl Scout who’s ready to bridge to adulthood.  Let’s face it, we’re here for the hugs.

Formal volunteer recognition isn’t something a volunteer would ever ask for, but it is something that makes her feel valued and appreciated.  Kind of like when your kids magically clean their bedroom for your birthday and you didn’t need to remind them about it.

What does it fell like to receive an adult volunteer recognition?

About seven years ago, my service unit decided  to celebrate our volunteers by recognizing at least one person who’s done an outstanding job that year.  Just to make it interesting, we keep it top secret until we hold our end of year celebration.  It’s become a great tradition and has yielded some really big surprises.  Being a volunteer should be celebrated.

As the Membership Connection Committee chair, I know that Girl Scouts of Colorado recognized nearly twice as many volunteers in 2017 than we did the year before.  This increase still means we only recognized about 1% of our volunteers.

What do I do next?

Nominate someone today!  Applications are open now and must be completed by March 31, 2018, to qualify for this year’s award cycle.  http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/for-volunteers/volunteer-appreciation/adult-recognition-nominations.html. All of the details about the application process including the qualifications can be found in the Appreciation Award Packet.

Questions about the MCC?  Learn more at: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/about-girl-scouts/membership-connection-committee.html

Girl Scout Brownie (and cancer survivor) gives hope to patients at Children’s Hospital

More than two dozen Girl Scouts, family, and friends joined Girl Scout Brownie Elena V.  for “Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams” at Children’s Colorado on Saturday,  Feb. 10, 2018. Elena battled leukemia for four years and won! Now that she has been cancer-free for two years, she wants to give back to children who are still fighting.  While the crowd was smaller than expected, Elena’s dedication never wavered. When asked if she still wanted to host “Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams” even though it was cold and snowy, Elena said, “Cancer doesn’t care if it is snowing. Cancer doesn’t stop if it is snowing.”

Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams is designed to show patients and their families they are not alone. Pediatric patients shine flashlights from the hospital windows and look for community members standing outside the hospital to flash them back. It only takes a few minutes, but means a great deal to young patients and families.  Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams was created by the Beaumont Children’s Pediatric Family Advisory Council at Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan.

When asked why she wanted to do this event, Elena wrote, “Many children get diagnosed with cancer and when you get cancer sometimes you have to stay at the hospital. I remember when I had cancer and I had to stay in the hospital, I loved to play in the playroom with Play Dough. Sometimes when you stay at the hospital, you can walk around and go to the playroom, but sometimes, like when your fever is going up and down, you can’t even leave your room. It feels sad when you are stuck in your room or when you have to stay at the hospital for a long time. By doing this event, I want to support the kids that have cancer. I want them to know that they can get through it too. I want to give them hope.”

 

 

Elena’s Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams

Submitted by Heather Quinn

Edgewater

I want you all to meet Elena! Elena is the toughest girl I know and I’m a better person for having her and her mom in my life. Elena battled cancer for FOUR years. She beat leukemia and will be 2 years cancer free on February 10!

This year, Elena wants to give back to the kids who are still fighting. She heard about this event called Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams, and with the support of Girl Scouts of Colorado and the amazing staff at the Children’s Hospital of Colorado, we officially have the green light!

With Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams, we will gather as large of a group as possible outside of the windows of the cancer ward of the Children’s Hospital and shine flashlights in their windows and they can shine them back at us. All Girl Scouts, friends, and family are welcome to join.

If you would like to donate a flashlight or glow stick for patients to use, you can leave them at Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Denver Corporate Office during business hours between Feb. 1 and Feb. 8. All donations will be sanitized and donated to Children’s Hospital patients.

Learn more about the event and sign up.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteers needed: Cookie delivery day 2018

Delivery Day for the 2018 Girl Scout Cookie Program is fast approaching. The delivery sites are always needing more support and your help would be appreciated. If you haven’t already signed up for a time to support the delivery site, there is still time.

Broomfield **NEEDS VOLUNTEERS

1025 Eldorado Boulevard

Broomfield, CO 80021

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-level1

*This is our largest site with the least volunteers signed up.

Red Rocks Community College

13300 West Sixth Ave.

Lakewood, CO 80228

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-redrocks

Castle Rock- Castle View High School

5254 N. Meadows Dr.

Castle Rock, CO 80109

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-douglas

 Summit Ridge Middle School

11809 W Coal Mine Ave

Littleton, CO 80127

Sign UP:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-redrocks1

Elitch Gardens

2000 Elitch Cir,

Denver, CO 80204

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-summit1

Baileys Moving

11755 E. Peakview Ave

Englewood, CO 80111

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-baileys

Buehler

16456 E. Airport Cir #100

Aurora, CO 80011

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-buehler

Northern Delivery/Loveland

5296 Harvest Lake Drive

Loveland, CO 80538

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0f4fafa923a75-cookie2

If you are wanting to go to a delivery site that isn’t listed please reach out to the PPS for that region, to find out how to sign up. Don’t know who that is? Email inquiry@gscolorado.org.

 

Girl Scout Cadettes and Seniors from Aurora visit Challenger Learning Center

Submitted by Melissa Deal

Metro Denver

Aurora

Four Girl Scout Cadette and Senior troops from Aurora got together for a day of space exploration at the Challenger Learning Center in Colorado Springs. They participated in two space missions, and truly worked as a team to complete their mission! Good job Girl Scouts!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout continues to give back

Submitted by Victoria Fedorco

Metro Denver

Denver

I remember working and earning my Gold Award like it was yesterday. Since May 2017, I’ve graduated from Eaglecrest High School and went on to attend Metropolitan State University of Denver. During my first semester, I’ve given multiple speeches about “Adopt Don’t Shop” and the care of senior pets and how those issues have influenced my Gold Award. I’ve been keeping tabs on the Adams County Animal Shelter and found that the PVC Pipe pet beds have made a great impact on the comfort level of the senior pets and others at the shelter. I continue to speak about senior pets and their struggles and have written a research paper on the subject to help continue to educate and raise awareness.

I’ve used the leadership and management skills the Gold Award program taught me to become more involved in my college as well. I have become the Director of Game Day Operations for the Metro State Men’s Hockey Team. I have organized an upcoming event for the team: The Metro State Hockey Teddy Bear Toss. My love of Girl Scouts has stayed with me as well, as I have registered as a co-leader for my little sister’s troop. I will continue to work with them and encourage them to be their best selves and go for gold!

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twenty-five Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing take action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Meg Bleyle from Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, worked to increase the bee population by teaching children about how people need and depend on bees.
  • Beth Bolon from Longmont hosted a workshop for sixth grade girls to help them improve their communication skills and bolster their confidence when interacting with others.
  • Cheyanne Bridges from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with the Pikes Peak Humane Society to support their animal medical fund by providing a sustainable source of donations from her school.
  • Tara Butler from Denver, Overland High School, created a course and curriculum specifically for senior citizens to educate them on how to use their smartphone and better understand the technology.
  • Kayleigh Cornell from Aurora, Grandview High School, started the Colorado Book Bank and collected more than 1,300 new and gently used books for students in a summer lunch program.
  • Victoria Delate from Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, created a four-week self-defense course to give her fellow students the knowledge and skills to protect themselves from sexual assault.
  • Emma Deutsch from Denver, Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning, improved the cat rooms at the Denver Animal Shelter. By creating a more welcoming and colorful space, she encouraged more people to adopt cats.
  • Kamaryn Evans from Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, worked to raise awareness for victims of domestic violence and for the Crisis Center, which works to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and prevention.
  • Rose Goodman from Boulder, Boulder High School, created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees.
  • Elizabeth Hoelscher from Aurora, Grandview High School, partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage victims of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls.
  • Ashlin Hult from Niwot, Niwot High School, created a series of materials for middle-school girls to encourage healthy body image and increase self-esteem.
  • Zoi Johns from Golden, Lakewood High School, coordinated the installation of three 10,000-liter water filtration tanks in a school in rural Uganda.
  • Makayla Kocher from Monument, Colorado Springs Christian School, created an art program for nursing home residents.
  • Kayleigh Limbach from Niwot, Niwot High School, wrote aguidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academic future.
  • Alexis Montague from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, hosted a panel discussion so girls could learn more about career opportunities in STEM.
  • Sarah Ness from Centennial, Eaglecrest High School, hosted nearly two dozen after-school art therapy sessions to help kids at her school relieve and manage stress.
  • Gwyneth Ormes from Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, organized a series of after-school workshops to teach elementary school girls Processing (a basic programming language), along with the foundational concepts of computer science.
  • Emma Parkhurst from Centennial, Littleton High School, revitalized The Lions Cupboard, a local clothing closet, to make the space more accessible for families in need.
  • Makala Roggenkamp from Arvada, Faith Christian Academy, partnered with Hope House and created book templates for children to develop a love of reading.
  • Abagail Sickinger from Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to help high school students get a job. Topics included: resume writing, what to wear, conducting yourself during an interview, and how to answer interview questions.
  • Katrina Stroud from Boulder, Niwot High School, created an activity booklet for The Butterfly Pavilion to teach children about Monarch butterflies and bumble bees.
  • Grayson Thomas from Lyons, Lyons High School, designed a mural of diverse and significant members of the STEM community for Lyons Middle/Senior High School.
  • Marieke van Erven from Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.
  • Melissa Wilson from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, developed several materials to educate people who can hear about how to interact with those who are deaf.
  • Inspired by her mother’s battle with cancer, Susan Wilson from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a media center for cancer patients undergoing treatment at Parker Adventist Hospital.

The Girl Scout Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

About Girl Scouts of Colorado

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Elizabeth Hoelscher, Aurora, “Girls for girls library and welcome baskets”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I built a library and put together welcome baskets for a shelter (Avanti House) that houses girls 12-17 that have been victims of sex trafficking.  The issue I wanted to address with my project is the negative aftermath of sex trafficking as well as the continued prevalence of sex trafficking in our community. I wanted to improve lives of sex trafficking victims that need distractions and added normalcy to their lives after sex trafficking. While I cannot eliminate trafficking, by doing my project I spread awareness about sex trafficking and its continuing prevalence in our state, country, and world.

I made presentations on my project to raise awareness to the Green Hat Society and teachers at my school which subsequently lead to book donations. I presented to teachers at my school to spread awareness about the problem and help them identify the signs of sex trafficking as they see their students on a daily basis and would most easily be able to identify the problem. In all, I was able to collect 670 books through donations and the purchase of a couple of books I thought were must haves, which are now in the main living space and classroom for the girls, while the adults have one with their books in the office. I also supplied each girl a bookmark in their welcome basket to get them introduced to the library. The welcome baskets also included blankets, journals, coloring books, socks, water bottles, candy, and a couple of other items I felt were important that they have.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my Gold Award project from the feedback on the books and items in the welcome baskets and also from the persons who heard my presentations.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Kristen Harness from Avanti house has agreed to continue to make the welcome baskets for the home and other women they come across.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have e-mailed several similar shelters that do similar work in other states in hopes that they might adopt the same projects.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned about my ability to be independent and take charge. From this project, I learned how to bear ALL of the responsibilities for my work. From organizing donation pick-ups and moving in the library and welcome bags, I learned a lot about myself, including my drive and passion for a cause I believe in.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will make me more confident in being a leader as well as doing large projects and tasks on my own.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award allowed me to finish off my 12 years of Girl Scouting with one last impactful project that made a change.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

This helped me become a better leader as I have exposed myself to situations that require independence.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Silver Award project: Hope Farms

Submitted by Nikki Goethals

Metro Denver

Aurora

For our Silver Award, Troop 2551 decided to help out at a nonprofit organization called Hope Farms in Elizabeth, Colorado. Their mission is to offer an opportunity for people and animals to learn, grow, and heal together in nature.

It was an amazing opportunity to help provide for people and animals at the farm. Hope Farms provides experiences for anyone in the community, regardless of ability, to learn about nature and animals on their farm.

There are a variety of animals on the farm that we learned about. There were horses, ponies, donkeys, cows, pigs, goats, chickens, ducks, alpacas, dogs, cats, and more.

We felt we could help provide some additions to the farm to greater benefit the farm volunteers and attendees. We completed three projects for their sensory trail to donate to Hope Farms. We built and stained two benches for people to sit on at the farm to either take a break or to enjoy the beautiful sights and sounds. We created a sign for their sensory trail and hand painted symbols for each sense. We also spray painted black tires bright colors for the participants to sit or play on outside. The troop used their remaining money to purchase a colorful wind chime for listening to. It was an amazing experience for us.

We learned various skills like woodworking, painting, planning, and most importantly, helping others and improving our community. We had an amazing time and Troop 2551 would like to do more volunteer work for Hope Farms in the future!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Days at Elitch Gardens: Patch contest winner

Congratulations to our Elitch Gardens Patch Contest Winner, Gianna G., from Aurora! Gianna’s design will be on our event patch that each participating Girl Scout will receive. Gianna also won two daily park passes, two VIP passes, and two special ride passes. A special thanks to Elitch Gardens for the generous prize pack for Gianna! We had 18 great entries, so thank you to everyone who participated.

Join us for our annual Girl Scout Days at Elitch Gardens! All Girl Scouts, friends, and families are invited.

Date: Friday, Aug.11 – Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017

Cost: $25.99/person. Tickets can be purchased here. A donation will be given back to GSCO for each ticket sold.

Not able to make it during the weekend? No problem! We have a great season-long deal offering a daily park ticket for $29.99/person that’s good through the end of October.

We hope to see you there!