Tag Archives: animals

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Voice for Animals badge Part Four of Five

Girl Scouts can earn the Senior Voice for Animals badge at home with help from our Outreach Program team. By earning this badge, you will find out about the complex relationship between animals and humans, so you can make informed choices and help others make them too.

Every year, at county fairs and the National Western Stock Show, animals are used for sport and entertainment. From dog agility shows, Mutton-bustin contests, rodeos, and 4-H projects, children and adults are entertained statewide by animals as small as birds and rabbits and as large as bulls and horses. We also have several zoos and aquariums in Colorado, where animals are put on display for entertainment and education.

Choose an animal to research. It might be a farm animal being raised as a 4-H project, lives in a zoo, or travels across the country competing in rodeos. Write a short story, poem, article, or create a blog post or video from the point of view of the performing animal. What would you imagine a day in their life is like? What would that animal want its owners or handlers or keepers to know? How has its daily life changed due to the stay-at-home orders? Is it happier or sadder?

Share your creative piece on the GSCO Blog, FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Voice for Animals badge Part Three of Five

Girl Scouts can earn the Senior Voice for Animals badge at home with help from our Outreach Program team. By earning this badge, you will find out about the complex relationship between animals and humans, so you can make informed choices and help others make them too.

Husbandry is a fancy word that means the science of taking care of animals. One specific area of husbandry is breeding, which is the decisions that go into making baby animals. We are going to look into domestic pet breeding today. To do this, we are going to research responsible dog breeding.

After taking Girl Scouts of the USA’s Internet Safety Pledge, find out what is involved in responsible dog breeding. Here are some topics you can explore:

  • What testing is done before breeding two parents?
  • Are there breeds of dogs and cats that have been overbred too much, and therefore have difficult health problems (like pugs and breathing or English bulldogs and giving birth)?
  • How do responsible breeders find good homes for their puppies?
  • What are the laws of pet breeding in your area?
  • Which breeds that are bred too often and therefore there are an abundance that wind up in animal shelters?
  • What constitutes a “puppy mill” and what can be done to eliminate them?
  • What are Bully Breed Bans, why do they exist, and does the science of breeding back them up?
  • Explore a new crossbreed, labradoodles, for example. Why was it developed?
  • How have the breed standards evolved over time? How are new breeds developed and recognized? How are breeds that are dying out being reintroduced?
  • Any other topic related to dog breeding you can think of.

Some resources to get you started (but there are plenty of others):

With your research, write a law that further protects dogs in the area of breeding. Share it on the GSCO Blog, FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Voice for Animals badge Part Two of Five

Girl Scouts can earn the Senior Voice for Animals badge at home with help from our Outreach Program team. By earning this badge, you will find out about the complex relationship between animals and humans, so you can make informed choices and help others make them too.

Whether animals should be used for product and medical testing is a tricky question. With this step, we will look at how animals are used to determine if new medicines or beauty products are safe for people.

After taking Girl Scouts of the USA’s Internet Safety Pledge, research the arguments for and against animal testing:

  • What animals are most likely to be used in tests?
  • Are any protected by the Animal Welfare Act?
  • How are products tested when they don’t use animals?

Next, find a variety of beauty products. This could include a shampoo or conditioner that makes your hair feel just right, a cleanser that’s part of your daily skin routine, an item of make-up or nail polish, or the deodorant or fragrance you wear every day.

Find one that DOES and one that DOES NOT have “cruelty-free,” “vegan formula,” or “produced without animal testing” written on the label.

Research how these two beauty products were developed. Were animals used on the product without claims of cruelty free research? If so, how? Make a visual timeline or diagram of the development of both products, showing how and when they tested for human safety.

Share what you learned on the GSCO Blog, FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Journey in a Day event for Daisies

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Troop 70720 ran a “Three Cheers for Animals” Journey in a Day event for Daisies at the McKee 4H Ranch Building in Loveland. 27 Girl Scouts Daisies from around the state joined them. The girls had a guest speaker from Animal Friends Alliance, made lots of projects, and did activities! For the ending project, they did a Take Action project of making winter feral cat boxes for a local animal rescue! They will distribute the boxes out to areas that have homeless/feral cats which can use them.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scout Cadettes support Wags and Menace

Submitted by Darby Petitt

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

Girl Scout Cadette Troop 442 of Highlands Ranch was chosen to represent Wags and Menace at the Doggie Dash on Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Boulder Reservoir. Wags and Menace is a foundation that funds emergency medical care for animals around the world, ranging from dogs to sloths to elephants and all animals in between. The Girl Scouts spent the last month collecting blankets, towels, and sheets from their neighbors and schools to present to the Humane Society of Boulder Valley on behalf of Wags and Menace. Their collection was the largest ever collected at this event while the girls promoted the Wags and Menace foundation at the Doggie Dash. They walked the two-mile loop with the other participants and canine friends while learning about pet safety and care from the Wags and Menace representative. At the conclusion of the event, the Girl Scouts were presented with a Best Kids’ Team Spirit Award for their efforts in collecting supplies and representing the Wags and Menace Foundation team.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Three Cheers for Animals with Girl Scout Daisies

Submitted by Nancy Muklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Girl Scout Daisies from Steamboat Springs have been learning more about animals with the “Three Cheers for Animals” Daisy Journey! Before our trip to the Routt County Humane Society, we decided to make something to keep the pets there comfortable. We asked them what might be helpful for their animal guests. We tied fuzzy fleece blankets into pet beds for the cats and dogs we are going to visit! We also made special no bake pumpkin and peanut butter dog treats to share with new friends at the shelter.

We are go-getters: We try new things like tying knots in our blankets. It’s harder than you think!

We are innovators: We work as a team to make sure everyone’s blanket is finished! Sometimes one knot is just as good as the two the pattern describes!

We are risk-takers: We dip our hands into the peanut butter batter to roll it into balls of goodness for our pet friends.

We are leaders: We know that taking good care of animals is a lot like taking good care of ourselves. We all deserve a wonderful life!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Wild in the Outdoors-Raptor Girl Scout Day Camp in Pueblo!

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Come join us at the Nature and Raptor Center of Pueblo (NRCP) for a Free Range Kids day camp this summer.  You will build shelters, learn new outdoor skills, cool off by wading in the Arkansas River and learn about Colorado’s raptors. This camp is takes place July 15-19 and is for girls in from second to fifth grade. If you can’t attend this Wild in the Outdoors camp, your Girl Scout troop can also fulfill nature badge requirements easily with the Nature Center activities.  There are free weekend raptor talks at 11:30am on Saturday and Sundays. On May 4th you can attend the Raptor Center Open House to see the new larger cages for recovering birds. To learn about all the various group and individual activities the Nature and Raptor center offers, you can visit their website or call 719-549-2414.  You can register for the Wild in the Outdoors camp here.