Tag Archives: Academy District 20

Gold Award Girl Scout: Megan Burns, Colorado Springs, “The Silver Lining Project”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a website and social media presence made up of art created, inspired by, or created during the COVID-19 pandemic. I made it as a way for artists to express how they felt during this tumultuous time. I also created sticker designs in order to raise money for the website.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I knew my project has made an impact because I have gotten submissions from many different states and communities, all with different perspectives and ideas they wish to express through their art.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My website will stay active online after I have stopped receiving submissions. This is why I created my sticker designs. I also created a YouTube video as an advertisement to fully explain my project.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have received submissions from Ukraine and the UK. I have also gotten a blog up on the WAGGGS website to reach the international community further.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I am more capable of connecting to dozens and dozens of people than I first thought I was. My time management skills were also strengthened as a result of this project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I am planning to pursue a career in graphic design in college. I can point to this project as an example of my web design and organizational skills. It could also potentially help me get a job later down the road.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel as though this project was a really good, finalizing way to end my time with Girl Scouts. It represents all the things I have learned and all the friends I have made being a part of it. I’m so proud of all I have been able to accomplish.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I feel as though my project in itself was a huge risk. Cultivating an online presence is extremely difficult and there were so many times I wondered if this would even work at all. I’m so thankful to say it did. I was lucky enough to have a mentor and support system that helped me find artists willing to submit.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Breanna Lewis, Colorado Springs, “Sewing for Humanity”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?  

I taught people how to sew and I also tied it in with a community service project.  This helped them learn the skill of sewing and then since we made pillowcase dresses, we donated the dresses to people who needed them.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience? 

I couldn’t have in-person classes, so I decided to measure my impact on how many people watched the videos I made on YouTube.  I had more than 1,600 views on one of my YouTube videos.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?  

All my videos are on YouTube, so anyone can watch them at any time, and anyone can teach a class on how to make the pillowcase dress or a scrunchie.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection? 

The places that I’m donating the pillowcase dresses to are a church that goes on missionary programs. I’m also sharing my online class guide with Girl Guides in Germany and Italy. I also have videos online that anyone can watch if they have internet access.

What did you learn about yourself? 

I learned that teaching someone how to sew is hard and that you must be adaptable and go with the flow. I learned a lot, but I need to work on my communication skills for how to get the idea across. I also learned how to take charge of things and how to be a better leader.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future? 

I have always known that I want to help other people as a career choice. This is just giving me one step closer to achieving helping other people.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?  

Since I did this my senior year, I feel like it’s just wrapping up Girl Scouts, in general, this is the last year to do everything to get it done. I think this is just the last hoorah of a Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I feel in a way I became a G. I. R. L. I’m an innovator because nothing went according to plan, so I always had to reinvent my idea to go about it a different way.  I think I’m a risk-taker because I have never taught a class before and it’s a hard thing to accomplish and so just trying to get the idea across was just hard and putting yourself out there is a risk. I also had to be a leader during this project because I had to teach other people and to be able to do that, I had to be a leader and have good communication on how to explain how to do each step of how to make something.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Brittney Smith, Colorado Springs, ” Exploring an Artist’s Viewpoint”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project,  I wanted to empower and inspire my community and local artists. To achieve this dream, I created an annual art show tradition, at my high school, to showcase student art. The student art that is showcased targets a worldwide issue or a controversial perspective. These projects have allowed people to connect with others through their similarities and differences, and open people’s perspectives on a worldwide issue. For my art show, I was able to achieve these goals through art in a unique and non-verbal way. I created eight different ocean-themed sculptures on Altoid mint cans. These cans represent how sea animals turn our trash into their homes. The idea of ocean pollution is a controversial subject, but something that needs to “sea” change.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

To vocalize this controversial topic, I hosted an art show for the public to discuss their opinions and different perspectives. At my art show, I used surveys to see and prove that art can bring different perspectives together and inspire others.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

I created an art show curriculum to continue to inspire other artists and people for years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

This curriculum has been sent out to all of District 20 in Colorado Springs, the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, the Fine Arts Center, and the National Arts Honor Society.

What did you learn about yourself?

Throughout this project, I have not only learned about other people’s perspectives, but I have learned many things about myself too. For example, I learned that I tend to put more on my plate than what I can handle. During this project, I was working three different jobs, going to college as a full-time student, and somehow made time for the gym and the ones I love.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Although I had way too much on my plate, I am proud to say that I persevered and earned my Gold Award. This award will help me earn dental scholarships and future jobs. I am currently completing my first of 14 years of college to become an Oral Maxillofacial Surgeon, and every scholarship helps.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

By earning my Gold Award, I can say I completed Girl Scouts. The satisfaction of finishing something that once appeared so much bigger than myself is what continues to drive me as a person, artist, and G.I.R.L.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

To be a G.I.R.L. a person must be gusty, iconic, robust, and loyal. My Gold Award has helped me become more brave, different, strong, and more of a leader.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Nicole and Xena’s Coronavirus Silver Award Project

Submitted by Cari Sledge

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

We are Nicole and Xena, Girl Scout Cadettes from Troop 43893. We are in seventh grade at Timberview Middle School. We have completed our Silver Award, the highest award a Girl Scout Cadette can earn. A Girl Scout Cadette receives her Silver Award after completing a Take Action project to improve an issue in her community that she really cares about. We decided that we wanted our Take Action project to help people in our community who were selflessly helping our community during the COVID-19 pandemic. We chose to make reusable cloth masks for the Sodexo kitchen staff who work from Timberview Middle School’s kitchens to provide lunches to the students in Academy District 20 who would normally use the free lunch program.

During our Take Action project, we made 70 reusable cloth masks for our kitchen staff who are part of Sodexo. After the schools were closed as a response to the COVID-19 virus pandemic, the kitchen staff continued to prepare meals, four days a week, to provide lunch for the school children who received free lunches during the school year. We met Mrs. Yesmin, Mrs. Eli, and Mrs. Kathy from Sodexo. Mrs. Kathy helped us deliver the masks to Sodexo as they didn’t want any outside people in the kitchens to help prevent the possible spread of germs. We chose to provide masks so the Sodexo workers could be in a safer environment while continuing to give lunches to the students who don’t have access to lunches at their homes.

We made the masks with two pieces of fabric, ribbon, and a nose piece. First, we sewed the nose piece on one piece of fabric, and then we sewed the fabrics together and ironed the seams open and flat. Next, we turned the fabric right side out and sewed the passageway for the ribbon. Last, we put the ribbon into the masks, and they were ready to be given to Sodexo. We delivered 70 masks to Mrs. Kathy on May 3, 2020, and they were distributed between the 35 staff members on May 4, 2020.

We connected with our local and global communities by making masks for the Sodexo staff to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The impact our Take Action project had on our community was a safer work environment for Sodexo staff. Also, because the masks we made are washable, they will be better for the environment than having to throw away mask after mask and having to buy more. The impact of our project will go on past our involvement because by keeping the kitchen staff safe it creates a safer environment for those who receive lunch from Sodexo and for all who come in contact with Sodexo staff on a daily basis including their families.

What I discovered about myself was that I’m even worse at socializing now that I have only socialized with the same people for about three months. I learned that I am more socially awkward than I thought and that I am scared of sewing machines. The skills we gained that help us as leaders were confidence to socialize with people we didn’t know and compassion to care about the kitchen staff’s wellbeing along with the people the kitchen staff come in contact with. We also learned how to be better at talking to people, asking for help, and accepting help from others. What we learned from others who worked to solve the same problem was how to make the masks, and that the nose pieces will break your needle if you’re not careful. This helped make our project better because it helped us make the masks properly, efficiently, and correctly to help us protect the people wearing them.

We lived the Girl Scout Promise and Law by helping our community. We used our resources wisely by using what we already had at our disposal. We respected ourselves and others by being kind to our kitchen staff and each other. We made the world a better place by helping prevent the spread of COVID-19. Finally, we were considerate and caring of Sodexo’s need for supplies.

A Silver Award Take Action project should provide a solution to an issue that matters to us. We believe that we did a good job and accomplished what we originally aimed to do which was provide support to people helping during the COVID-19 pandemic. We are happy that we have succeeded in making our kitchen staff’s work environment safer for themselves and the meal recipients.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.