Light their way at the Colorado Freedom Memorial

Submitted by Karla Coronado

Metro Denver

Aurora

Troop 62754 volunteered at the Colorado Freedom Memorial last month by turning off the candles in under 28 degree weather. The girls have helped in this event for the last two years, rain or snow. It is our way to say thank you to our fallen heroes. Despite the cold and freezing rain, our girls were excited to help at this event, always with a smile and they work without complaining.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Renee Gangwish, Boulder, “Fence It Up”

What did you do for your Gold Award Project?

For my Girl Scout Gold Award Project, I completed an historic and environmental restoration project. My project was to restore the fences around Walker Ranch Homestead. It was mainly to bring out a group of volunteers to restore rotted out and broken down fences for the good of the community, as well as increase public awareness on a wide scale of the need for environmental restoration not only for current use, but for future generations.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I increased public awareness on a wide scale by using my curriculum to reach about 150 people at my dance team, 40 at the Parks and Open Space Advisory Committee meeting, and 30 girls and parents from my troop. I hope to increase the visitation percentage to Walker Ranch, but unfortunately I do not have any data to illustrate if this was accomplished as it will take more time for the data to be collected. I was the first Girl Scout to work with Boulder County, and have opened the door for many more to do the same.

How is your project sustainable?

The fencing will be sustained for many years after my project due to the new and stronger material we will be using, but also by others who have the same passion as me and will continue to restore these fences. The sustainability mission of Boulder County and Walker Ranch is to “maintain a high quality of life, without compromising the ability of future residents to do the same.” My curriculum will be sustained because I have a signed letter from the owner of my dance studio, Artistic Fusion, promising to allow me to continue on teaching and sharing my curriculum to inspire kids and their families from across all of Colorado. As well, my website will stay up and continue to be viewed by people, as well as promoted by Boulder County through a flyer of mine which will be put up at their offices to direct people to my website. This will allow my message to continue to be spread through the Internet and all of those who see it.

What is your projects global and/or national connection?

My project was shared in the local newspaper, as well as being aired on CBS4 News in Colorado. My website is able to be seen both globally and nationally. I sent my website to WAGGGS, Piper Jaffray, National Parks and Service’s Office of Public Relations, the State of Colorado Office of Public Relations, International Affairs Department of the University of Colorado, Boulder, as well as to Boulder County Parks and Open Space.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I can interact and manage working with several organizations at the same time, although often challenging. I learned that I can recruit, organize, and lead a team of my friends and fellow students to accomplish a project of this magnitude. I learned that if I am passionate, hard working and persistent, it is possible to achieve great things.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I believe that earning my Gold Award will make me more prepared and confident in my actions in the future. Whether it be in school or in a job, I feel that this experience will be one a keep with me and use it to better myself in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award, though isn’t the complete end of my experience, was a summation of everything I have learned through Girl Scouts, as well as how Girl Scouts has changed my view on the world. The passion and care I have for the environment was curated through Girl Scouts, which is what lead me to create and spend a lot of my time on my Gold Award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me become both a leader and go-getter. I had to coordinate with many different people and companies in order to get everything accomplished for my project, causing me to become a “go-getter” and take action to ensure everything got done. I also became a leader through taking charge of my project and everyone who helped me during the process.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Celebrate the “Holidays the Girl Scout Way”

When Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low founded Girl Scouts in 1912, one of her goals was to make Girl Scouts available and open to all. From that first gathering of a small troop of 18 culturally and ethnically diverse girls, Juliette broke the conventions of the time—reaching across class, cultural, and ethnic boundaries to ensure all girls had a place to grow and develop their leadership skills.

This holiday season:

  • Embrace the diversity in Girl Scouts and the world around us.
  • Embrace the Girl Scout value of giving back through community service.
  • Give the gift of Girl Scouts so that all may participate.

Named for our founder, Daisy’s Circle is Girl Scouts of Colorado’s monthly giving program. $19.12 per month can provide nine girls with annual Girl Scout memberships, nine more girls who will become part of this amazing organization with its 107-year history of living and celebrating The Girl Scout Way.

Special “Holidays the Girl Scout Way” Offer

Join Daisy’s Circle any time during December 2019 and receive a coupon for a 40% discount and free shipping from the
Girl Scouts of Colorado Shop! *

Celebrate “Holidays the Girl Scout Way” by joining
Daisy’s Circle: gscodaisyscircle.org

* Discount applies to transactions completed in-person at Girl Scout Shop in Denver, via phone at 1-855-472-7026 or email Retail@gscolorado.org. Coupon cannot be combined with other offers, used on prior purchases, transferred, copied or used online or through Girl Scouts of the USA.  Offer limited to in-stock merchandise only based on availability. Expires 3/31/2020.

DecemberSign2019

Gold Award Girl Scout: Abby Kennedy, Lakewood, “Band Buddies Music Mentorship”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my project, I created a program where Lakewood High School students go to local elementary schools once a week to work with the elementary school band students on their instruments. In these after school mentoring sessions, the high schoolers work with elementary schoolers who play instruments in the same family (brass, woodwinds, etc.). The aim of this was to help the elementary schoolers improve more rapidly to show them the benefits of music and how rewarding it is to play an instrument, to ultimately increase the likelihood that the would continue with music into middle school and high school. In order to make this project long lasting and to spread it, I created a basic curriculum, as well as a website to both share my project and provide a framework for future students in my school to continue the project.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The main component of my measurability was a survey for the elementary school students asking if they planned on continuing with band into middle school taken at the beginning and end of the tutoring program last year. In the initial survey, only half the kids were sure that they would continue, while by the final survey all of them were sure they would continue, which was a great success. I also made qualitative observations about the student’s general attitude towards the program and music, as well as their skills throughout the year, and they all ended more excited about music and better at their instruments.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

At the level of my school, I am working with students who are currently tutors and underclassmen so that they can take over when I graduate at the end of this year. I am providing my school with instructions on how to run the program, to make sure the core ideals and basic method of running the program don’t get lost over time. My advisor, the band director of the elementary schools in my area, has also stated that he is dedicated to keeping the program running as well. He will be a key component in sustaining the program at my school for years to come, being a constant as kids come into and graduate from high school. On a larger scale, my program will live on through my website and the instructional resource I created to help guide others to start and run programs in their own areas, which I am sharing with other students who are passionate about music.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project is based on a topic that people is applicable to anywhere in the world in addressing music and music education. This is dealt with on all sorts of levels depending on the country and area you consider. Some countries in Europe have subsidized arts programs, while this varies a lot throughout the United States., and then some underdeveloped countries rely on outside organizations to bring in any music education at all. With this, I helped to address music education as it was most applicable to my area. In order to expand my project to a global scale, I reached out to Tri-M Music Honor Society, an organization with more than 6,000 chapters of dedicated music students globally, about publishing a link to my website and curriculum on their website as a potential service project idea. This would apply my project to students all over the globe, and I am eager to keep working on establishing this connection.

What did you learn about yourself?

I am a reserved and shy person, and I have never been super comfortable putting myself out there, public speaking, and working with new people. Going into this project, this made me very unsure of my ability to be a leader and a teacher. Throughout this process, I have found myself facing and conquering these obstacles, showing myself that I am capable of both leading and teaching, as well as overcoming my fears.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

As I go into college next year, the skills I acquired in terms of leadership, communication, and working with new people will be incredibly important. From becoming practiced at reaching out to new people who could potentially help my cause, to figuring out how to lead a team, these are all skills I can use for the rest of my life. I am certain that I would have not gained these skills had I not completed this project, and I am grateful to have these skills to help me succeed in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Having been a Girl Scout since kindergarten, the Gold Award has been a valuable experience in wrapping up my time as an active member of Girl Scouts, as I graduate from high school this year. The project combined many things I had learned through Girl Scouts throughout the years, and with this I think the Gold Award was a remarkable opportunity to enact everything my Girl Scout experience gave me. Overall, the Gold Award has in many ways been the culmination of the Girl Scout career, solidifying and amplifying everything I have learned since I began 13 years ago.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Completing my Gold Award has definitely helped me become more of a go-getter. Having faced many obstacles, tried many solutions, and accepted a few instances of failure with my project, I am much more open to trying new things and tackling a situation head-on. I am less afraid of facing obstacles and can focus on working towards solving an issue, instead of focusing on how an idea could fail even if it has great potential for success. This has made me much more willing to go for something even if I have inhibitions, hence more of a “go-getter.”

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Joslyn Hays, Gunnison, “Marbles Kiosk”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I promoted the game of Ringer within my community and with tourists. I built a kiosk by the Gunnison Marble Rings explaining the game of Ringer and its history in Gunnison. The game of Ringer is a traditional game played with marbles and a 10-foot ring. It focuses on the importance of sportsmanship. I also hosted marbles workshops, placed bags of marbles with in-depth rules at the Jorgensen Park Ice Rink and Gunnison Tourism Office for people to borrow, and helped the City Council write a resolution naming the Gunnison Marble Rings the Jerry Piquette Marble Rings.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I handed out surveys at my workshops. The surveys showed how much people’s  knowledge increased on a scale of five (average increase of 2.4) and whether or not they enjoyed the workshop, found it informative, and would like to play marbles again. The results were all positive and showed that promoting marbles is important.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The kiosk will be maintained by the Gunnison Parks and Recreation Department, so it will continue to stand for tourists and locals to come and learn from. The Gunnison Marbles Club will replenish the bags of marbles and instructions in case they get stolen, and they will host the workshops in early summer. These groups will help to continue promoting marbles around my community and make my project sustainable.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I sent pictures and the concept for the kiosk to the National Marbles Committee’s Facebook page for them to share with the rest of the marbles community. This was the method that they asked me to share my project with them through. We hope that Marble Clubs around the nation will follow my example to promote marbles and its sportsmanship.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am good at public speaking. That is an activity that I don’t enjoy, but was required of me throughout this project. It was good to learn that I can do it without seeming uncomfortable.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The leadership skills I learned while earning my Gold Award will stay with me through the rest of my life. I will be able to lead groups in school and my future career by understanding how to work with lots of different groups and set and enforce deadlines. Knowing that I can lead will also help me be more confident in general. This will allow me to do my best work in all future endeavors.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was the finish line for my Girl Scout experience. I had known that I wanted to earn it since I was a Brownie. Earning my Gold Award was a big part of my overall Girl Scout experience. I was able to focus and pursue my Silver Award and a Journey knowing that they led to the Gold Award. I always tried hard when selling cookies because I knew that some of the money would go towards my Gold Award. More than having been my goal, doing my Gold Award project has been a big part. I’ve been able to see the skills I’ve learned from Girl Scouts come together to help me in this project. I’ve also been able to develop as a leader, which is a great thing to start at a younger age. These have helped me understand the importance of getting my Gold Award and why it tied my Girl Scout experience together,

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Getting my Gold Award helped me become a go-getter. My project was nontraditional and focused on promoting a small, but important activity. Marbles is an inclusive activity that promotes sportsmanship above all else. I hope to have portrayed those values through my time as a Girl Scout. By pursuing this project, I believe that I set a stage that Gold Awards should be different and unique projects specific to your community. I was also one of the few girls on the Western Slope to earn her Gold Award this year. I hope that my achievement encourages other girls to complete their project as well.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Join us on the GSUSA 2020 Destination to Morocco

Submitted by Lipica Shah

New York City

Girl Scouts USA is offering a summer 2020 Destination to Morocco co-chaperoned by two GSUSA National Volunteer Partners, Lipica Shah (NY) and Stefanie Argus (RI). This is the third international trip since 2018 to be chaperoned by trained and enthusiastic GSUSA volunteers, which makes this opportunity unique!

Do you know a girl who will be between the ages of 14 – 18 this summer? She can have the ultimate adventure while traveling with other teens from across the country to Morocco: Where the Mountains Meet the Sea!

Trip highlights: immersion in the history and culture of this beautiful country, while exploring its ancient cities (Casablanca, Marrakesh), mountain villages (Zawiya Ahansal), and beaches (Essaouira), and exercising our linguistic, cooking, community service, and camel riding skills. Plus surfing, stand-up paddleboarding, ziplining, and more!

Check out all the details, including an informational webinar, at: http://forgirls.girlscouts.org/travel/morocco-where-the-mountains-meet-the-sea/

Questions? Want to know more? Contact us at gsmorocco2020@gmail.com!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Register for TCM Cookie Program Training

Are you the troop cookie manager (TCM) for your troop? Excellent! Thank you for supporting girls and adults during the 2020 cookie program! New TCM training is required for all first and second year TCMs and experienced TCM training is required for all third year+ TCMs. Note that some trainings offered are “new” and “experienced” combined, to better serve rural communities.

Below is a list of statewide, in-person, TCM trainings by date. Register for TCM training today! Click on the title of the training and you’ll be directed to the registration page. All TCM training classes are FREE. A confirmation email will be sent to you after you register.  Service unit cookie managers, troop cookie managers, and troop leaders are also invited to attend TCM training.

During TCM training you will learn what to consider when placing your initial order and how to use eBudde to manage inventory through different phases of the program. New features in eBudde will also be highlighted, along with tips to make cookie booths a success, and how-to best support girls in your troop and their families. Attending in-person volunteer training also gives you an opportunity to have your questions answered, share your experiences, and connect with other volunteers.

Statewide, in-person Girl Scout Cookie Program training (listed by date)

New and Experienced TCM Training – Durango

Date: Tuesday, December 3, 6 – 9 p.m

Region: Southwestern Colorado

Location: Florida Mesa Presbyterian Church

New and Experienced TCM Training – Cortez

Date: Wednesday, December 4, 6 – 9 p.m

Region: Western Colorado

Location: First United Methodist Church

New TCM Training – Denver Metro

Date: Friday December 6, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m

Region: Metro Denver

Location: Martin School of Early Education

New and Experienced TCM Training – Longmont – Morning

Date: Saturday, December 7, 9 a.m. – Noon

Region: Northern & Northeastern Colorado

Location: Heart of Longmont Church

New and Experienced TCM Training – Longmont – Afternoon

Date: Saturday, December 7, 1 – 4 p.m.

Region: Northern and Northeast Colorado

Location: Heart of Longmont Church

Experienced TCM Training – Colorado Springs

Date: Saturday, December 7, 10:30 a.m. – Noon

Region: Pikes Peak

Location: Pikes Peak Library 21C

New TCM Training – Colorado Springs

Date: Saturday, December 7, 12:45 – 3:45 p.m.

Region: Pikes Peak

Location: Pikes Peak Library 21C

New and Experienced TCM Training – Frisco

Date: Saturday December 7, 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Region: Mountain Communities

Location: Summit County Church of Christ

New and Experienced TCM Training – Rifle

Date: Monday December 9, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Region: Western Colorado

Location: Rifle Library

New TCM Training – Denver Metro

Date: Wednesday, December 11, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Region: Metro Denver

Location: Martin School of Early Education- Ogden St

New and Experienced TCM Training – Montrose

Date: Wednesday, December 11, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Region: Western Colorado

Location: Montrose Library

New and Experienced TCM Training – Gypsum

Date: Thursday December 12,  6 – 9 p.m

Region: Mountain Communities

Location: Grace Fellowship Church

New TCM Training – Denver Metro

Date: Thursday December 12, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Region: Metro Denver

Location: Martin School of Early Education- Ogden St

TCM Training

New and Experienced TCM Training – Denver Metro – Morning

Date: Saturday, December 14, 9 a.m. – Noon

Region: Metro Denver

Location: Colorado Christian University – Leprino Hall

New and Experienced TCM Training – Denver Metro – Afternoon

Date: Saturday, December 14, 1 – 4 p.m.

Region: Metro Denver

Location: Colorado Christian University – Leprino Hall

New and Experienced TCM Training – Loveland – Morning

Date: Saturday, December 14, 9 a.m. – Noon

Region: Northern & Northeastern Colorado

Location: Thomas M. McKee 4-H Youth and Community Building

New and Experienced TCM Training – Loveland – Afternoon

Date: Saturday, December 14, 1 – 4 p.m.

Region: Northern & Northeastern Colorado

Location: Thomas M. McKee 4-H Youth and Community Building

New and Experienced TCM Training – Grand Junction

Date: Saturday, December 14, 9 a.m. – Noon

Region: Western Colorado

Location: GSCO Grand Junction office

New and Experienced TCM Training – Pueblo

Date: Saturday, December 14, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Region: Pueblo

Location: Pueblo City/County Library – Rawlings (Main) Branch, 4th Floor

Experienced TCM Training – Denver Metro

Date: Tuesday, December 17, 7 – 9 p.m.

Region: Metro Denver

Location: Smoky Hill Library, Room A

New and Experienced TCM Training – La Junta

Date: Saturday, January 4, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Region: Southeastern Colorado

Location: First Presbyterian Church, La Junta

Colorado Girl Scouts participate in The Juliette Low Seminar

Girl Scout alums Anna Beucler, Krista Beucler, Kayleigh Cornell, and Caroline Farmar, along with GSCO Board Chair RaeAnn Dougherty participated in The Juliette Low Seminar, the flagship leadership development event for the World Association of Girl Scouts and Girl Guides (WAGGGS). Nearly 1,000 WAGGGS members from 150 countries traveled to 20 different host countries to make new friends, connect with different cultures, and exchange ideas on leadership and gender equality. The seminar took place November 14-20, 2019.

Anna, Krista, Kayleigh, and Caroline were each awarded funds from the RaeAnn & Richard E. Dougherty Look Wider International Travel Fund. Krista’s program was in Thailand, Anna’s in Nigeria, Kayleigh traveled to England, and Caroline to Peru.

Pet adoption connection

Submitted by Chandra Allred

Western Colorado

Glenwood Springs

I have a troop on the Western Slope. My Juniors did their Bronze Award last year contributing to one of the largest pet adoption fairs held in the Glenwood Springs area. Helping pets is a huge passion for my girls.

Last week, my family adopted from a rescue in Denver which rescues from high kill shelters in other states. We picked up our new baby and we were met with a wonderful surprise, a gifted blanket from a Girl Scout troop in Denver.

I just wanted to tell you girls “Thank You!!” Keep up the good work, such a very special gift.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scout racing derby coming up

Submitted by Sandi Knowles

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Troop 70720 is putting on a Girl Scout Racing Derby in Loveland on January 19, 2020. This event is open to all Girl Scout levels. Girls will create their own cars to race and may enter their design in the Girls’ Choice design competition.

Trophies will be awarded at each level for first, second, and third place, as well as best design. A grand prize trophy will be awarded to the overall race winner.

For more details and to register, visit: https://girl-scouts-racing-derby.cheddarup.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts of Colorado