Edna “Skipper” Hollis

Submitted by Nancy Riddle

Metro Denver

Jackson

Edna “Skipper” Hollis. What an amazing woman, and I am so very proud and lucky to have had her as a Girl Scout leader. She taught valuable life lessons and remains an inspiration.

My fondest memory was of a 17-day, 4,000 mile bus trip in 1962 with 27 Girl Scouts, four leaders, and an intrepid bus driver, “Daddy Jim”. We camped through five states and Canada with a four-day stopover at the World’s Fair in Seattle. What adult in their right mind takes this on? Skipper Hollis!

With four patrols responsible for daily cooking, clean-up, log keeping, photography, programs, and other tasks, we learned more that summer than can be imparted in this simple missive.

Skipper always hand-wrote annual messages to me through her 103rd year. I especially cherish a note she wrote at the end of the afore-mentioned trip: “…but-in in my way- if I’ve helped you to know personally the true values that Scouting should unveil, then I’m happy to have been an interpreter of its realness. Scouting is a very fine guide to living. May it always be an enrichment to you…”

May Skipper’s legacy live on as it has for members of Troop 362 and may Girl Scouts continue to inspire young women.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to celebrate the legacy of one of our most cherished alumnae, Edna “Skipper” Hollis. In 2016, Skipper passed away at the age of 104, leaving a 94-year history of Girl Scouting as a girl and an adult volunteer.  Skipper touched the lives of hundreds of girls, families, and volunteers and will be remembered for her love of the outdoors and the annual troop gathering she hosted at her Colorado cabin for more than six decades.

To make a gift in honor of Skipper, which will support opportunity grants to ensure any girl is able to attend camp, or  to honor an alum who has made a difference in your life, go to the Girl Scouts of Colorado website: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/support-us/alumnae.html 

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

New activity opportunity in Northern Colorado

Submitted by Hailey Groo

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Girl Scouts of Colorado has partnered with the Poudre Heritage Alliance of the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area to bring a new activity opportunity! Through the Poudre Heritage Alliance’s Community Wellness Program, Girl Scouts can visit the Cache la Poudre River and participate in a super-fun heritage hunt! The available routes stretch from Bellvue to Greeley, and fulfills requirements towards the Brownie Hiker badge! Find out more about the program and sign up your Girl Scout troop at poudreheritage.org/wellness-program.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Wizarding weekend at Tomahawk Ranch

Submitted by Amy Caperton

Metro Denver

Littleton

Come join us at Tomahawk Ranch for a weekend of Quidditch, wand making, potion making, games, and crafts.

August 25- 27, 2017
Juniors and Cadettes

$100 per girl. $35 for Safety Wise adults. (Extra adults can join for full price IF there is room)
Visit http://troop2904.ksibusinesssolutions.com

Questions: Please e-mail us at troop62904@gmail.com

A $25 deposit per person is required to hold your spot. Please send one check for all participants.

Deadline for registration is July 15

Sponsored by Troop 2904

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Service project: The Solitary Bee Hotel

Girl Scouts have a great service opportunity to help build nests for The Solitary Bee Hotel located at Waterton Canyon in Littleton. Girls can build simple bee nests and then install them on July 21, 2017.

The Solitary Bee Hotel project is a community project which will construct a nesting site for solitary bees at the canyon. The Solitary Bee Hotel will be an active nesting site, and will also educate visitors at Waterton Canyon about solitary bees and their importance in the ecosystem.

Solitary bees make up the majority of bees in Colorado (around 70%), and play an important role in the pollination of plants that are in our food chain. Honey bees are well known as pollinators, but in recent years their populations have been in decline. This makes the role of solitary bees as pollinators more important than ever.

Home Depot is partnering with Denver Water and local bee experts at The Bees Waggle (TheBeesWaggle.com) on this project. Local scout groups are being asked to create the solitary bee nesting houses which will then be placed in the hotel structure at the “Grand Opening” event on July 21, 2017.

For more information, contact Philip Cuka at (303) 489-4521 or send email to SolitaryBeeBandB@yahoo.com

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Nicole Niles

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Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Nicole Niles in the Pikes Peak region was recently recognized for her outstanding work as a GSCO volunteer. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Nicole to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My daughter of course! I didn’t get to go far on my Girl Scout journey due to an out-of-state move and family issues when I was young. When I became a mom to my beautiful girl, I knew I wanted to get her involved when she was old enough. 10 years later here I still am volunteering.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

The many roles I play just like the most of us 🙂 I am a troop leader and fall and cookie sale manager. I serve on our service unit’s board as secretary and I am a GPS advisor. GPS is “girl planning system, ” a group of girls who help plan various events around the Pikes Peak region. I help on the cookie committee and most importantly, I am the mother of a Girl Scout, so helping her on her journey to achieve her goals is my biggest role.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

What have I learned ? Well, I have learned a lot. Peer pressure is a big issue these girls face, along with the image factor. I have seen a lot of girls quit Girl Scouts because friends did not think it was cool and these girls wanted to protect their image and not be associated with the group. I have also learned that aside from the girls who give up, there are also those that stand taller because of being a Girl Scout and they are not bothered with the image and they want to go farther in their journey and help fellow girls around them succeed and reach their goals.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

If the girls I encounter during Girl Scouts can take anything away from me, I hope that they take away the hard work and perseverance of their journey. I see and encounter such a strong group of girls, who aside from sports, school, work, social life, and family,  give just as much effort to Girl Scouts and I hope that they know how proud I am of their hard work and determination and know they will go far in life and can achieve anything they set their mind too!

What is your favorite Girl Scout memory?

I have so many over the last years, but the one that touched me the most was during the cookie sale two years ago. My entire troop sold for each other. I know all leaders divide cookies differently and we all have our own way. The way my troop divides puts it as what you sell is what you earn to include booths. Two years ago not a single girl in my troop just sold for herself. One sold for so and so trying to get the Build-A-Bear experience.  One sold for a girl to go to a Top Seller event and on and on the cycle went. I spent cookie: season in tears, amazed at the lessons my troop/girls have learned: Be a sister to every Girl Scout, friendly, and helpful. That has to be my most memorable memory that touched me in my Girl Scout journey.

What words of advice do you have for other volunteers?

Reach out for help. Take advantage of the trainings offered both online and in office. Seek out help from your service unit. Don’t be afraid to ask even if you are asking a girl 🙂 There are several girls who actually seek out to help and mentor new troops. Girl Scouts is thousands strong. Use your resources and use them wisely!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Top Sellers celebrate at Greeley Stampede

38 Girl Scouts and guests gathered on Saturday, July 1, 2017 at the Greeley Stampede to celebrate Top Sellers who sold 750 packages or more of Girl Scout Cookies during the 2017 Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program. Top Sellers and their guests enjoyed the Stampede’s many attractions and the PRCA Pro Rodeo while also being treated to a BBQ buffet, during which the girls were presented with their Top Seller medallions by the GSCO Product Sales staff. The event was attended by six of the state’s top 100 sellers for the 2017 sale.

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kayleigh Cornell, Aurora, “Colorado Book Bank”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

In my project, Colorado Book Bank, I collected gently used children’s books from families in a local middle school. The middle school’s chapter of National Honor Society helped collect, sort, count, and box the books I collected.  I received even more books from an elementary school after their used book sale, which NJHS helped sort. After taking the books to the food bank I partnered with to give kids a lunch and a book over the summer, I received 1,360 books.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

By counting how many books I donated I determined that I could reach 1,360 kids as each kid got their own lunch and book. While I can’t see how my program affected their education level, I can impact kids right now by giving them a book to read.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

Colorado Book Bank collected books from several different schools. The largest donor was an elementary school who has an existing used book sale that has always searched for a good donor partner to gift their leftover books to each year. I also worked with a local middle school to kick off the project. They are considering the project into another food bank they work with for an existing food drive they already conduct. The elementary school, Peakview, plans to continue donating books to JFS to support the lunchbox program. For the past decade, they have held a spring used book sale with a large number of books left over. The librarian has agreed to donate all leftover children’s book after each book sale to JFS to continue the project. JFS has agreed to pick up the books from the school since that has been the main stumbling block for book donations in the past. Peakview’s librarian also plans to share about the option to donate book sale leftovers to JFS.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

During my project, the chapter of National Honor Society at my school agreed to help move the books to JFS. They also helped me get in touch with the organization as a whole to get my project open on a wider scale. I connected several parts of my project by working with different National Honor Society (NHS) groups. One of the membership requirements of NHS is to provide community service. In support of this work, NHS has a national website that includes a searchable database of project ideas. Club sponsors and student members use the database to find new projects for their club. My project is being listed on that database with a link to my website so other chapters of NHS can create their own Book Bank in their community. In addition, NHS publishes an e-newsletter and have expressed interest in promoting Colorado Book Bank through that publication. Finally, I have created a website to provide supporting documents for other groups who would like to replicate the project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about planning and how while it’s challenging, it has to be done. I also learned that leading a team of other people can be very tricky because you have to pull together the best parts of everyone and make sure all the parts you have work together seamlessly.  I’ve always known I like doing things, but during my project I learned how important it was to delegate tasks to my team to get everything done.  One of the biggest things I learned was that good communication played a key role in my project.  It’s important to ask for help because that is the only way people know you need it and it is important to be clear in written emails and phone calls.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

In the future, I want to be able to lead my own team of scientists and study the formation of planets. I need to be able to work with multiple teams to do this and pull together many different resources to achieve top-notch results from my team. Because of my project, I know how to contact different organizations and pull together people who wouldn’t have worked together otherwise.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I learned so much about myself and how to help others. I wouldn’t have been able to learn the same skills I did if I hadn’t done my Gold Award. I could learn how I could help my community and make a difference beyond what I thought possible.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I became a go-getter because I saw a problem in my community that I wanted to solve, so I found a way that I could start solving it.

I was an innovator because I found a new way to try to start lowering rates of poverty while including people in my community.

A risk-taker meant being able to start something and talk to people that could have become a lot less popular than it actually did. But I wanted to try my project and it paid off in the end.

I became a leader because I created a team of people I relied on as they simultaneously relied on me. I took their strongest skills and combined them to form an amazing project and amazing team.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Top Sellers celebrate at Elitch Gardens

185 Girl Scouts and guests gathered on Saturday, June 24, 2017 at Elitch Gardens in Denver to celebrate Top Sellers who sold 750 packages or more of Girl Scout Cookies during the 2017 Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program. Top Sellers and their guests enjoyed the park’s many rides and attractions while also being treated to a cookout inspired lunch buffet, during which the girls were presented with their Top Seller medallions by the GSCO Product Sales staff. The event at Elitch Gardens was attended by 19 of the state’s top 100 sellers for the 2017 sale, including Ciara Leal, the state’s #1 top seller.

 

 

GSCO offices and shop closures

Girl Scouts of Colorado offices statewide and the shop will be closed July 3-7, 2017 for the Fourth of July. Offices statewide will reopen July 10. The Girl Scouts of Colorado Shop will reopen July 11. Please mark you calendars for some other additional closures:
  • Pikes Peak regional office in Colorado Springs:  July 25
  • Northern & Northeastern CO regional office in  Loveland: July 25 and August 1

Get your Colorado Girl Scout license plates before time runs out 

Written by Penny Roberts of Estes Park and AnneMarie Harper, Girl Scouts of Colorado Public Relations Director

Update as of June 28, 2017: We have exciting news from the Department of Revenue! The Colorado Girl Scout license plate will never be retired! Earlier this year, the Department of Revenue informed GSCO if 3,000 people had not registered for the plate by July 1, 2018, it would be retired. However, they have since decided that the Colorado Girl Scout license plate will remain whether or not 3,000 people register for it by July 2018. Learn more.

Time may be running out to get your Colorado Girl Scout license plates! According to the Department of Revenue, 3,000 people must register for the plate by July 1, 2018 or it will be retired. At last check, less than 300 Colorado Girl Scout license plates had been issued. That means if more than 2,700 people don’t register for this special plate before July of 2018, it will become extinct.

The cost is $50 above the regular license plate fees and the plate can be registered to any type of vehicle, including motorcycles. Put them on your motorhome, scooter, new car, or vintage classic. Even Dad’s Plumbing Co. can put Girl Scout plates on his entire fleet of vehicles! Girl Scout plates can be put on a currently registered vehicle after a transfer.  Also, Girl Scout plates can be transferred from one vehicle to another under the same ownership.

Get your Colorado Girl Scout license plates before time runs out! Get started at the Department of Revenue’s website: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dmv/node/40131/ You can also request Girl Scout plates at your County Clerk’s office, and they will be shipped directly to you from the State in just a few days.

The Girl Scout license plate was created in 2010 and 2011 by a Promise Partners alumnae task force as part of the 100th Anniversary celebration of Girl Scouts of the USA. It has since been available for purchase by anyone who wishes to celebrate and publicize the legacy and continuing efforts of Girl Scouts of Colorado.

Get your Colorado Girl Scout license plates today and we promise to wave at you when we see you go by!

Contact Penny Roberts at probertscolo@gmail.com or (970) 586-1775 for additional information.

 

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado