Category Archives: Volunteer News

Volunteer View: May 2018

Renew now to claim your Early Bird incentives

Your unstoppable G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker,  Leader)™ spirit has the unlimited potential to change girls’ lives and make amazing things happen every single day. You have the strength to take on what others can’t, the determination to keep going, and the drive to accomplish what you never thought possible. Because you’re not just a volunteer—– you’re a Girl Scout! And it’s a G.I.R.L. like you who makes all the difference in your troop members’ lives as they embark on another year full of the one-of-a-kind leadership, success, and adventure that only Girl Scouts has to offer them.

Any girl renewed between May 1 and June 15 will receive a free Early Bird patch. Any troop that has completed the Annual Troop Report for this membership year and has two, unrelated Troop Leadership Team members renewed by June 15 will receive a $25 credit to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Shop.

Renew today

Extended Year Memberships now available

Have you heard about the new extended year membership option? This makes it easy to add new girls to your troop now and have them join your troop/girls on your summer adventures. When girls sign up now, they can take advantage of the new extended year membership offer and get 17 months of Girl Scouts for $35 (new members only).

If you know of troops thinking about getting started in your area, spread the word so they can take advantage and get going this summer!

Learn more

Get outdoors with Girl Scouts and The North Face

Girl Scouts has been blazing the trail for girls’ leadership in the outdoors for more than a century, and our Outdoor badges (all 52 of them!) continue to be one of the most popular badge categories.

In April, Girl Scouts of the USA announced an exciting multiyear collaboration with The North Face in which girls will challenge themselves, learn about the natural world, and continue the Girl Scout tradition of having life-changing outdoor experiences.

To power the next generation of women who push boundaries and move mountains, The North Face has teamed up with us to support the development of 12 new Outdoor Adventure badges, with programming ranging from mountaineering and climbing to backpacking, hiking, and trail running. As part of Girl Scouts’ iconic outdoor experience, with The North Face’s support, Girl Scouts will introduce bold new programming that embodies both organizations’ shared mission to provide girls, regardless of socioeconomic status, with outdoor experiences that enhance their leadership skills and confidence and encourage them to seek challenges. Watch for more information this summer!

Cookie Program Rewards update

Rewards began shipping to all Service Unit Cookie Managers in mid-April. Cookie Credit cards were mailed beginning April 11 to any girl who selected the “Mailed directly to girl” option in eBudde. Any girl who selected her credits to be “Held at council for Camp” had those applied to their camp balances and remaining credits were also mailed out. Should a girl not receive her card by mid-May, please reach out to the Product Program Team to see if the card was returned to council. Any other issues regarding credits should also be directed to the Product Program Team.

Girls who reached the 750+ package level and selected one of the Top Seller events in eBudde should have received an email to RSVP for the event. This email was sent to the email address listed for the girl’s primary guardian in the GSCO membership database.

The Product Program Team is working to distribute all S’mores Club bracelets to those girls and volunteers who earned them. Should there be any question regarding the bracelets please reach out to your PPS for details. S’mores Club Avatar patches will be mailed during the month of May directly to the address each girl or volunteer provided in the M2 system for the 2017 Fall Program or the address listed for them in the GSCO membership database.

Upcoming Events

May 19 – Annual Statewide Bridging at the Royal Gorge Bridge, Cañon City. Cost: $17/person bridge entry and $5/Girl Scout or $3/family member for GSCO reception. Come join us for our annual bridging at this beautiful bridge! All Girl Scouts are invited. Bridging begins at 11 a.m. with a short reception following. Girl Scouts participating in the reception will receive a special event patch. Not bridging? Not a problem! Come enjoy our GSCO discount at the bridge all day long. Register here for the GSCO bridging reception. Bridge entry is paid the day of the event at the gate.

June 10 – Girl Scout Swim Party at Pirate’s Cove, Englewood.
Join us for our annual Girl Scout swim party at this fun water park!

June 15 – Girl Scout Bridging and Overnight with the Colorado Sky Sox, Colorado Springs. 
It’s our annual sleepover and bridging with the Sky Sox. Come enjoy the game and stay for the sleepover afterward. It’s 80s night, so get your big hair, neon colors, and big hoop earrings ready to wear to the game!

August 26 – Scout Day with the Colorado Rockies, Denver.
Cost: Tickets range in price depending on seat location. Come cheer on the Rockies as they take on the St. Louis Cardinals. Girl Scouts can participate in a pre-game parade and get a special event patch. Last year tickets sold out before the game, so get your tickets early this year here and use promo code GS2018. A portion of ticket sales will be donated back to GSCO.

Want event details delivered to your inbox weekly? Sign up for the Events email at gscoblog.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Rusty Merill

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Rusty Merill of Woodland Park in the Pikes Peak region was nominated by a GSCO staff member as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Rusty to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a girl member for 10 years, started as a Brownie in 1948, and continued through INTERMEDIATES, and Seniors, receiving my Curved Bar award in 1957. I enjoyed Girl Scouting so much, I wanted to continue and share it with other girls.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Assistant leader to an Intermediate troop, leader of one of the first JUNIOR troops in Jamestown, N.Y in 1963, then was leader of Brownie, Junior, Cadette and Senior troops, including being the Skipper of Mariner Ship 10 in Newport, R.I. Camping was was kept me in Girl Scouting, so became a camp counselor, unit leader, riding counselor at Tomahawk Ranch, program specialist, program director, and camp director at Girl Scout camps around the U.S. Have also been a Neighborhood Chairperson, Troop Consultant, Council Delegate to local council and national council meetings, and Master Council Trainer and curriculum design, a role I still hold.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That you learn as much as the girls,  you make hundreds of lifetime friends, and you learn how to be FLEXIBLE and keep your sense of humor even in the middle of a disaster!

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

That it really IS COOL to be a Girl Scout, no matter your age.  You get to experience wonderful opportunities, make lifetime friends, and learn skills that help you your entire life!

I recently reconnected with a former troop member on Facebook, and renewed a friendship after an absence of over 50 years!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

G-I was very shy as a young girl, but being in Girl Scouting helped me gain confidence, that has carried over to my adult life. Now I am able to lead a group, teach skills, and speak to a large group.

I.Innovator-I have learned by trial and error, not afraid to learn from my mistakes, and how to be creative, especially in primitive camping, when you realize you don’t always have what you need. We devised an “architectural victory” on a backpacking trip, when we were on a 10 day donkey pack trip and it rained for 7 days, using our creative GS skills.

RISK TAKER-As a Girl Scout, you can be faced with a lot of challenges, either as a girl or adult, but the skills and experiences you learn as a girl or adult Girl Scout, helps you face new things with courage and confidence. I love trying new experiences!

LEADER-In the old program, troop government was the basis of all Girl Scouting, so I learned leadership when I became a PATROL LEADER, and eventually a TROOP PRESIDENT, and a member of the STATEWIDE SENIOR PLANNING BOARD. All these experiences continued to build on my leadership skills which continues in my adult life in and out of Girl Scouting.

As a retired teacher, and a current camp and outdoor professional, all my leadership skills have helped me in my varied careers of teaching, recreation, physical therapy, and above all camping and outdoor skills.
Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

You can help all girls have the Girl Scout Experience

As a Girl Scout volunteer or parent, you see the value of Girl Scouting every day. At Girl Scouts of Colorado, we believe that every girl deserves the chance to be a Girl Scout, to have amazing experiences, to do things she wouldn’t otherwise do, and to become the best she can be.

A family’s resources should not be a barrier to a girl’s future success.

Girl Scouts of Colorado awards more than $125,000 annually in Opportunity Grants for families in need. Grants can support membership dues, uniforms and books, costs to attend camp or events, training fees for adult volunteers, and more.

Named after Girl Scout founder Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low, Daisy’s Circle is Girl Scouts of Colorado’s monthly giving program. Funds raised through Daisy’s Circle are available to families who need a little help so that their girls can fully participate in the Girl Scout Experience.

Whether you are already a Daisy’s Circle member or you become one today, you have the opportunity to double the impact of your support. Thanks to a generous match challenge made by lifetime Girl Scout and GSCO Board member Kathy Ambrose, all new Daisy’s Circle monthly donations or increases to existing monthly donations will be matched, up to $25,000.

This offer ends May 31, 2018 so act now to maximize your support!

Join now or learn more about Daisy’s Circle and how you can help.

Volunteer Spotlight: Laurie Stragand

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Laurie Stragand of Littleton in the Metro Denver region was nominated by her daughter as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Laurie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer first to help with the Brownie group in our troop.  They had a lot of girls and the leaders seemed stretched thin. I thought I could make a difference with the group my daughter was in.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My volunteering started with the Brownies and during my daughter’s second Brownie year. I have continued being a leader during my daughter’s time as a Junior and will carry on as a Cadette leader. I became our troop cookie mom in 2014-15 and have served as our cookie mom every year since.  Last year, I also volunteered for the treasurer position. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girl Scouts has given me a surprising benefit from being both cookie mom and treasurer; with both of these positions my skill with Excel has increased dramatically.  On a serious note, I have learned that you get out of Girl Scouting what you put into it and my daughter’s experience, along with the other girls, is better for my being actively involved.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

I hope the girls have learned from me while helping them with the badges.  As second year Juniors, the girls worked in groups and presented a badge for the rest of the Junior group.  I hope this helps the girls learn to be more independent, purchase within a set budget, take the initiative to research and lead the badges, and practice public speaking skills to overcome the fear of presenting to a group.  I also hope my own daughter has personally learned that it may not be easy to volunteer but with the right group/troop support it can be very rewarding.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Before taking on the roles I have in our troop, I was not used to being out in front of people. I am very comfortable doing things in the background.  As TCM for a troop of over 50 girls, I have created spreadsheets for booths to account for physical sales and the new digital side, for planning the initial cookie order, organizing cookie pickup times, and to schedule the last day for cookie return/settlement.  Holding parents and girls accountable for money and the schedule forces you to be assertive to achieve a better outcome for the whole troop. 

As treasurer, I have tried to make sure all the leaders are repaid the money they spend for badges and supplies in a timely manner.  To do that, we had to raise our troop dues and explain why the increase was necessary.  I feel in a smaller single level troop that would have been much easier than explaining to the parents of 50 girls in a multi-level troop why we needed a 60% increase in troop dues to continue to provide and an excellent program without the volunteer leaders personally covering the fees and expenses.
Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Jordan Cadena

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jordan Cadena of Thornton in the Metro Denver region volunteers at both the troop and service unit levels. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jordan to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer to spend more time with my daughter and make a positive impact on girls’ lives. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out just helping at meetings. Last year, I became a co-leader and service unit treasurer. This year, I have my own multi-level troop (with an incredible leadership team and very involved families). I am also the service unit treasurer and service unit product program manager.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Oh man!! Haha! So much and I never stop learning. I have learned and grown as a mom and woman. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope girls have learned how to be a good role model and teacher to younger girls. I hope they have learned how to be patient and compassionate, how to lead other girls, and celebrate others’ accomplishments. I hope they have learned how to set goals and know how to plan the process of achieving those goals. I hope they’ve learned to reflect and see where they can do more or make a positive difference or influence for/on others.  

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Girl Scouts has helped me become a G.I.R.L. on many different levels. I find myself being more outgoing and ready to take on new tasks with a higher level of confidence. Being a troop leader and service unit team member encourages me to be innovative often. I’m always trying to find ways to do things better in my troop and make suggestions where I see fit in the service unit. I will go the extra mile to ensure the success of my girls, my families, and our leaders in the service unit. I hold myself to a higher level of discipline and accountability because of Girl Scouts. Whatever I can accomplish now, I know there is always more and that I am capable of more. I’m constantly looking for ways to learn, improve, make a difference and inspire.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scouts of Colorado Provide Trees for Forest Restoration

Submitted by Ryan Lockwood,  External and Media Communications Specialist for the Colorado State Forest Service

As part of a budding partnership between the two organizations, the Colorado State Forest Service has received a donation from the Girl Scouts of Colorado to provide 7,500 seedling trees to be used for reforestation efforts in Colorado.

The donation, made to the CSFS-administered Restoring Colorado’s Forests Fund, will be used to provide seedlings for planting in areas impacted by wildfires, floods or other disasters, and that are critical to water protection and wildlife habitat. The number of trees was chosen to honor each of the approximately 7,500 Girl Scout volunteers statewide.

The timing of the gift this month coincides with today being National Arbor Day and last week being National Volunteer Week; this year, in lieu of individual gifts typically given to its volunteers, Girl Scouts of Colorado instead chose to invest in the seedling trees.

“Girl Scouts of Colorado volunteers give their time, energy and, most importantly, their heart to making Girl Scouts a great experience for girls and that has a lasting and positive impact,” said Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “In recognition of all the amazing things that these volunteers do, we chose the gift of trees that will also have a lasting and positive impact by helping to restore forested areas in our beautiful state.”

Mike Lester, state forester and CSFS director, said that the goal is for this to be the beginning of a long-lasting organizational partnership between Girl Scouts of Colorado and the CSFS. As part of a collaborative arrangement, the agency is helping Girl Scouts gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of trees and forests in Colorado, initially through increased participation in an annual CSFS-led Scout Day, tours of the CSFS Nursery and educational materials designed specifically for youth.

“We see clear parallels between our mission to achieve stewardship of Colorado’s forests and the mission of the Girl Scouts of Colorado to prepare our youth for leadership,” said Lester. “Both of our organizations have the potential to mature and shape our collective future in positive ways.”

Those interested in volunteering or making donations to help conserve and restore Colorado’s forests can go to csfs.colostate.edu for opportunities and information. To make a donation directly to the Restoring Colorado’s Forests Fund, visit https://advancing.colostate.edu/RestoringColoradosForests.

***

The Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) provides professional forestry assistance, wildfire mitigation expertise and outreach and education to help landowners and communities achieve their forest management goals. The CSFS is a service and outreach agency of the Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University and provides staffing for the Division of Forestry within the Colorado Department of Natural Resources. For more information, visit csfs.colostate.edu.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong – more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Teri Shafer

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Teri Shafer of Westminster in the Metro Denver region is both a troop leader and a Product Program volunteer. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Teri to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My oldest daughter joined Girl Scouts in kindergarten.  When my younger daughter entered kindergarten, she too wanted to be a Girl Scout. At back to school, I filled out an interest form and, knowing someone needs to start a troop, decided to check the box that I was willing to volunteer. Eight years later, I never once regretted checking that box!

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I was almost immediately contacted and asked if I wanted to start a troop so I very quickly became a troop leader.  Along the way, I’ve enjoyed mentoring other troops and new leaders.  I have participated in recruiting events. I also have volunteered as a SUFSM for our service unit and this year took on the role of SUCM. I annually take on the jobs of FSM and TCM for our troop which readily prepared me for stepping into the SU roles.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I would have a hard time listing all the things I’ve learned as a Girl Scout volunteer! I have learned to allow the girls more and more control of everything about the troop as they have grown and matured. They now run all meetings and plan out everything they are going to do. I’ve really loved watching this progression and they have all stepped up to be amazing leaders. Not only CAN they take charge, but they love doing it and it has been very empowering for each of the girls. I’ve also learned that I enjoy working with kids and it encouraged me to start a new career as a substitute teacher. I doubt I would have started on this path without my experience in Girl Scouts!

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned from me to not be afraid to step up and take on a new challenge. They were so nervous when they first started leading meetings and I just kept encouraging them to have fun with it and not worry so much about fitting everything in or doing everything perfectly. They really seem to have embraced this and are absolute pros at it! I also hope they’ve learned a lot (and I’m pretty sure they have!) about running a business from selling cookies. I have always expected them to take it seriously and although they can have fun while selling cookies they do have a job to perform. They are all so amazing at it and have enjoyed running cookie rallies to share their talents and knowledge with younger girls. Any one of the girls in my troop could get a job today with what they have learned from selling cookies!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experience with Girl Scouts has definitely encouraged me to take on additional leadership roles in my life such as joining the PTO or stepping into service unit leadership roles. It also led to my career as a substitute teacher. I hope that taking on new challenges shows the girls in my troop and my own daughters that it can be rewarding and they shouldn’t be afraid of new challenges.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Fran Brown

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Fran Brown of Woodland Park in the Pikes Peak region has been a troop leader for 30 years, in addition to filling many other volunteer roles. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Fran to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because my most memorable and enjoyable years as a girl were those as a Girl Scout in an intermediate troop with the best leader ever!

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My volunteer roles as a Girl Scout: 

  • Troop leader for 30 years: Brownies (one year), Juniors (27 years), and Cadettes (two years)
  • Neighborhood/service unit director (10 years)
  • Council trainer (40 years)
  • Leader of a Wider Opportunity
  • Camp cook
  • Many more

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a Girl Scout volunteer, I have learned that every girl and woman with the desire and willingness to learn, has the potential for greatness.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

My hope is that every girl that I have interacted with has learned something of value to enrich her life.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I am a G.I.R.L. as evidenced by the fact that I am proud to be a Girl Scout volunteer following the Girl Scout Promise and Law, with 68 years of experience!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Cassie Aymami

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Cassie Aymami of Littleton in the Metro Denver region is the manager of the South JeffCo Cookie Cupboard. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Cassie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

A few years ago, my daughter was asking to join Girl Scouts. Unfortunately, there was not a troop at her school. So, I started a troop with a great co-leader. There are many girls who don’t get opportunities to try new things, explore, be brave, take risks, and go after their goals and dreams. I love the thrill of new adventures and thought it’d be fun and rewarding to share adventures with the girls. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Troop leader, cookie cupboard,  service unit fall sale and cookie sale manager. And anything else Girl Scouts of Colorado asks for help with.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

1. Everyone has a story. Each person has their own unique story and it’s important to respect, appreciate, and take the time to learn their story.

2. The smallest of things can have a big impact. One new opportunity or one kind message can open a whole new world to these young girls. They will see that what they thought was impossible is possible. They will know they can accomplish anything.

3. Gratitude. Being a volunteer has changed how I look at things. It reminds me on a daily basis what really matters: family, friends, health, and to remember the small things that give me joy.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they learn what I have learned: everyone has a story, the smallest of things can have a big impact and gratitude. I hope they also learn making mistakes is okay. Mistakes mean you are trying and you are learning. Taking risks might mean a mistake along the way, but it’s okay. Take the path that is needed to get to your goal and to fulfill your dreams.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have always been these things and have raised my children this way. The G.I.R.L is part of being a strong, independent, honest, positive, respectful, loving, courageous, and successful young lady. All the qualities of the leaders we need and are making through Girl Scouts. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Early Bird renewal promotion May 1 – June 15

As we head toward the finish line of a successful and memorable Girl Scout year, remember that your girls’ journeys have just begun. Come back next year for what promises to be another season full of unmatchable adventure at a place where girls can always take the lead, not stand in the background.

Any girl renewed between May 1 and June 15 will receive a free Early Bird patch . Any troop that has completed the Annual Troop Report for this membership year and has two, unrelated Troop Leadership Team members renewed by June 15 will receive a $25 credit to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Shop.

Mark your calendars and get ready to renew on May 1!

Renewal Tips