Category Archives: Uncategorized

Single event registration open for the Ski and Snowboard weekend

For all girls in 7th- 12th grade, registration is now open for single event passes for the Outdoor Adventure Club’s Ski and Snowboarding weekend with an overnight at Tomahawk Ranch on Jan. 26, 2018 at 7 p.m.  – Jan. 28 at 10 a.m.

What would a Colorado outdoor adventure program be without a ski day? We are excited to bring back this favorite event from last year’s OAC. This is one of our more ambitious events of the program year as we organize a charter bus, ski lessons, and manage our group of girls in a very busy public area.  Due to these factors, some of our registration processes and event details for this event differs from other events.

  • Registration Timeline: In order to reserve ski tickets, arrange lessons and order a charter bus for the correct number of participants, registration for will close on January 3. NOTE: After this point we will have reserved tickets, bus spots, and lessons.  Any cancellations of single event passes that occur after this date will be not be given a refund. After January 3, we will post a full event letter to your CampInTouch account.
  • Buddy Requests: We will honor one buddy request per girl for overnight cabin assignments, but ski/ snowboard groups will be determined by skill level and we can not guarantee girls will be with their buddy for ski groups – see below for more information.
  • Ski/Snowboard Group: On Saturday, ski/snowboard groups will be split up based on the information submitted in the “OAC Skill Level” form submitted in your CampInTouch account.  You are able to update this form at any point before January 3. Girls are welcome to snowboard, and should still rank their skill level of snowboarding on the form. NOTE: Girls attending with a single event pass MUST have ski experience of intermediate or higher, as we will not be providing lessons to single event pass purchases. Beginner lessons are being provided as part of the passport program. Due to the high cost of lessons, this is not an option for single event purchases.The intermediate and advanced ski/snowboard groups will be in small groups with two Girl Scout staff members or volunteers; all of whom are comfortable skiers/snowboarder and will be present for supervision and support. However, these volunteers are not trained ski instructors and will not offer professional instruction. As a reminder, the skill level options are:
    • Intermediate 1: Has skied/snowboarded 3-8 times and is comfortable going down green slopes with adult support, but minimal instruction.
    • Intermediate 2: Has skied/snowboarded 5 or more times and is comfortable going down blue slopes with adult support, but minimal instruction.
    • Advanced: Significant skiing/snowboarding experience and comfortable on black slopes.
  • Gear Rental: This is the only event of the OAC year where we require participants to provide their own gear. All participants will be required to bring their own ski or snowboard gear with them to drop off at Tomahawk Ranch on Friday night. If you do not have your own gear, please make arrangements ahead of time. The event letter posted on January 3 will include a complete packing list, as well as links to options for rentals.
  • Arrival/ Departure: All participants should plan to attend the full weekend: meet at Tomahawk on Friday night, travel to and from A-Basin on the group bus, and be picked up Sunday morning. We are not able to coordinate families meeting the OAC group at A-Basin on Saturday. We will only allow this in very special circumstances.

To Register: 

https://girlscoutsco.campintouch.com/ui/forms/application/camper/App

Instructions on How to Register: 

https://girlscoutsofcolorado.desk.com/customer/portal/articles/2856689.

We also need adult volunteers who are comfortable chaperoning a group of girls on blues or above for Saturday only from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Your ticket to A-Basin is included!

We hope to see you there! Email Anna Danila at anna.danila@gscolorado.org to volunteer or with any questions.

About the Outdoor Adventure Club

The Outdoor Adventure Club (OAC) is GSCO staff-led program for older Girl Scouts offering monthly high adventure activities such as mountain biking, rock climbing, white water rafting, and skiing.  Passport sales for the OAC have closed, but girls can register for individual events with single passes. Single event passes for the OAC Explorers (6th grade) are $100/ girl, and single event passes for the OAC Trailblazers are $75/ girl. Sign up at the links below to be notified as soon as single event registration opens for a program:

For more information and to see a list of upcoming events: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/adventure

Support Girl Scouts of Colorado on Colorado Gives Day

Year-round, you support our efforts to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.  On December 5, 2017, you can make your gift go even further. Colorado Gives Day is an annual statewide effort to celebrate and increase philanthropy through online giving. To make giving even easier, schedule your donation TODAY by using this link: https://www.coloradogives.org/GirlScouts/overview

By supporting Girl Scouts of Colorado on Colorado Gives Day, your donation dollars go further than they would on any other day of the year. That’s because the FirstBank Incentive Fund increases all donations made on December 5!  Every nonprofit receiving a donation on Colorado Gives Day receives a portion of the incentive fund, which increases the value of every dollar donated.

Schedule your donation today or give on December 5 at https://www.coloradogives.org/GirlScouts/overview. Once you do, share one of these two images on your social media accounts and be sure to tag Girl Scouts of Colorado.

Girl Scout Gold Award: Cheyanne Bridges, Colorado Springs, “Cans can help”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I created a program within high schools. This program is both a recycling and donation program. The students’ empty soda cans and other aluminum cans are placed in the collection bins placed throughout the school. Once the collection bins are full (approximately every two weeks but differs for every school), a volunteer for the local animal shelter picks them up and brings them to the shelter. The animal shelter then recycles the aluminum cans for profit. I also created a program guide, educational posters, and wrote morning announcements to develop and implement the program.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The aluminum can profits will go directly to the Pikes Peak Humane Society Animal Medical Fund. In 2016, the shelter medicine expenses were $1,393,781. This amount includes $10,431 spay/neuter operations, emergency surgeries, and medical attention from cruelty and neglect cases. In 2013, the aluminum cans generated $7,573.30 for the Humane Society. Over a course of two weeks, the high school gathered $1.05 in aluminum cans. Within a year that will add up to $27.30 for the Animal Medical Fund.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Cans Can Help will be sustained at Liberty High School through the active participation and management of the student council class through an agreement made with the student council advisor. This class will continue to collect the aluminum cans and prepare them for pick up by a volunteer from the humane society at regular intervals.  The pick-up schedule is managed by communication between the humane society and student council management team. The student council will continue to promote my program by creating a class competition to paint the collection bins. The competition will bring awareness to the collection bins and hopefully decrease the amount of trash found in them. The competition will have an animal theme to promote the cause that the aluminum cans are for.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have created a program guide which was distributed to multiple schools in the community and in a different state. I have distributed my program guide to Rampart High School, Pine Creek High School, Air Academy High School, and Orange High School in North Carolina. I have distributed the program guide by email and presentation. I have emailed Pine Creek, Air Academy, and Orange High School. I have gotten a response from the building managers at Pine Creek and Air Academy. I have also gotten a response from my cousin from Orange High School. I presented my program guide to Rampart High School and have gotten a positive response in return.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I have a passion to pursue a college degree and career that helps animals. I also learned that I know a lot more about animals than I had previously thought. I learned that my leadership can help save animals in the future and the present. I’ve developed leadership skills such as communication and relationship skills.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The many presentations that I have conducted have strengthened my confidence and preparation skills and therefore will help my leadership skills in the future. These skills will help me in college and eventually in my career. This experience has changed me as a person by helping my confidence grow. It helped my confidence in presenting and confidence for making new friends. This experience has challenged me to ask for help. Asking for help has never been easy for me especially when it comes to academics or anything related to academics. However, this project has helped me see that asking for help isn’t as hard as I have always thought.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning a Gold Award is a perfect representation of my life in Girl Scouts. I believe my program is worthy of a Gold Award because it has helped me grow as a person and helped me realize more things about myself than I would have never seen. Earning this award also means a lot to me since it has helped me learn what I love most in this world. The Silver and Gold Awards introduced me to parts of the humane society I would have never been a part of without participating in these awards.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award project helped me become an innovator. I introduced a new program into a high school that links both the high school and local animal shelter and I innovated a way to make that program benefit the humane society with items high school students use every day and end up throwing away.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Think you know Girl Scouts? Think again!

Disappointed by the way Girl Scouts are often portrayed in the media or viewed by the public, Naomi Allen, a go-getter from Grand Junction, took the lead to set the record straight. She wrote the following letter to the editor of her local newspaper, The Daily Sentinel. The letter was published both online and in the paper’s printed edition.

Portrayal of Girl Scouts in editorial was off base

I wanted to point out misinformation in your editorial about the Eagle Scout award and how it relates to the Girl Scouts. I have been a Girl Scout for more than seven years, and I have learned how to tie knots, shoot arrows, taken a cyber-security class at the Grand Junction Police Department and trained with a former female Spartan athlete at Girl Scouting events.

The one and only time I have sewed anything in Girl Scouts is stuffed bears to send to Syrian refugees. Home economics is an incorrect and outdated comparison to what Girl Scouts are like today and, as an active Girl Scout, I was deeply troubled to learn that this is how Girl Scouts are viewed.

The Girl Scout Gold Award is a prestigious award, though less recognized than the Eagle Scout Award. It is an 80-hour award that must be sustainable and benefit the community. Having your Gold Award can earn scholarships, assist with college applications, and automatically puts you one rank higher in the military.

Eagle Scouts may be astronauts, CEOs and powerful politicians, but female Scouts are in positions of power all over the world. The CEO of IBM is a former Girl Scout. Sally Ride, and the majority of female astronauts were Girl Scouts. Five out of six female governors in the United States are former Girl Scouts. And cookies? I’ve sold thousands of dollars worth of cookies, learned money management skills, and cold calling selling skills. We will use that money to go to Costa Rica with my Girl Scout troop where we will be performing local service projects.

Girl Scouts aren’t just cookie-selling little girls. We are strong leaders, CEOs, astronauts, engineers, and, most importantly, we are the future.

NAOMI ALLEN
Grand Junction

Girl Scouts is the Girl Leadership Expert

From Girl Scouts of the USA:

Girl Scouts is the best girl leadership organization in the world, created with and for girls. We believe strongly in the importance of the all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment that Girl Scouts provides, which creates a free space for girls to learn and thrive.

The benefit of the single-gender environment has been well-documented by educators, scholars, other girl- and youth-serving organizations, and Girl Scouts and their families. Girl Scouts offers a one-of-a-kind experience for girls with a program tailored specifically to their unique developmental needs.

At Girl Scouts, we are the girl experts, and for more than a century we have provided millions of girls opportunities for adventure, inspiration, and valuable mentoring. Offering hands-on, girl-centered learning in STEM, the outdoors, and entrepreneurship, and abundant opportunities to develop invaluable life skills, Girl Scouts helps all girls take the lead early and often. The Girl Scout Leadership Experience pairs girls with strong, caring female role models and mentors who prepare them to take the lead from age 5 to 18 and into adulthood. And we’re backed by more than 100 years of experience and expertise in the field.

As the premier leadership organization for girls, we are unmatched in delivering proven outcomes: 

  • Our Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest achievement in Girl Scouting, is a top-tier credential for girls as they enter their post–high school lives, enabling them to distinguish themselves in the college admissions process, earn college scholarships, and enter the military one rank higher.
  • No one does girl leadership better than we do. Compared to women who weren’t Girl Scouts in their youth, Girl Scout alumnae:
    • Are better educated and have more success in their careers 
    • Enjoy higher household and personal income
    • Are more active as mentors and community volunteers 
    • Have more confidence in themselves and their abilities
    • In the U.S., 90 percent of female astronauts, 80 percent of female tech leaders, 75 percent of current senators, and all U.S. Secretaries of State are Girl Scout alumnae.

At Girl Scouts, girls learn the skills, have the experiences, and cultivate the relationships that enable them to soar in life. From taking a night time hike under the stars to accepting a mission on the International Space Station; from lobbying the city council with her troop to holding a seat in Congress; from running her own cookie business today to tackling cybersecurity tomorrow—a Girl Scout is ready to change the world right now and accomplish big things in the future.

The need for female leadership has never been clearer or more urgent than it is today—and only Girl Scouts has the expertise to give girls and young women the tools they need for success.

Girl Scouts works. We’re committed to preparing the next generation of women leaders, and we’re here to stay.

Click here to find troops and other opportunities near you!

Adventures of a globetrotting Girl Scout: Inspirations for traveling abroad  

Submitted by Anna B., 2017 “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarship  winner

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Hi! I go by my camp name Simba. I have been a Girl Scout for 18 years since I joined as a Brownie. Being a Girl Scout has given me the chance to go to camp, cultivate outdoor skills, and travel abroad. I actually really discovered my love of traveling through Girl Scouting. Since that first amazing trip with my troop to Tanzania to climb Mount Kilmanjaro, I have been finding ways to see the world. Luckily, Girl Scouts as a part of WAGGGS (World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts) has access to the to their very own world centres. As a beneficiary of the “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarship, my most recent trip was to Sangam World Centre in Pune, India.  For four months, I was the program/marketing and communications intern. I highly recommend traveling through Girl Scouts, with your troop, or as an individual to the world centres or elsewhere and here’s why:

  1. It’s is totally possible to travel half way around the world (or farther)!

It is hard work to raise the money to go on even small trips abroad, but don’t forget about cookie sales! It took me four years to save up for my first trip. With the help of the “Look Wider” scholarship as well as receiving a travel stipend from WAGGGS for being an intern/volunteer, this trip to India was totally funded! The world centers have many scholarships available for their programs, so don’t forget to ask about them when doing your research.

  1. The challenge is worth it.

Stepping outside your comfort zone is hard and for most people traveling to India, a culture that is so different to ours in America, it is outside their comfort zone.  However, it is so rewarding when you learn to navigate that cultural experience and guide guests through it. I got to lead groups on tours of Laxmi Road, an older part of Pune. The first time I successfully guided a group through the markets and streets (without getting lost), did not lose anyone in the crowd of the line bazaar, and got on the right busses to get back to Sangam, I felt very gratified. It doesn’t sound too hard, but when you don’t speak the same language as those around you and can’t read the street signs, there is definitely an added challenge.

  1. Meeting Girl Guides and Scouts from all over the world

I was so inspired to met Guides and Scouts that truly dedicate themselves to WAGGGS and making the world a better place. A friend that I met at Sangam from Sweden will be on the Swedish delegation for Roverway and the WAGGGS World Conference. I met a Guide from Albania, which is not yet part of WAGGGS, who was sent as an ambassador to learn more about WAGGGS as they work on applying for membership. Living with me at Sangam, there where people from the UK, Canada, Rwanda, Belguim, Australia, Sweden, Senegal, Chile, Costa Rica, Japan and South Africa. There is also an incredible team of local staff at Sangam that looked out for us, answered all our questions and made us incredible food!

  1. The chance to build and work on professional and leadership skills

While at Sangam I was the program/marketing and communications intern. My background is in program for summer camp, but I knew nothing about marketing and communications. I can now make videos for promotion, use social media to update our fans about the goings on at Sangam, and use other creative platforms to tell people about upcoming events. I definitely saw participants gain leadership skills in the short times that they were at Sangam thorough working as a team on planning and delivering programs for Sangam’s community partners. There is always something to learn.

  1. Building confidence

I was really impressed with the volunteers I met when I first arrived at Sangam.  How easily they negotiated getting a rickshaw and delivered  Sangam programs to participants! I found out later that they were both shy and nervous when they first started. I never would have guessed from how confident I saw them. I also saw many of our guests gain the confidence to venture out on their own after being helped with how to get the bus or a rickshaw!

  1. The opportunity to join your global Girl Scouting family

Many people where surprised when I told them I would be in India for four months, but I knew that I was going to a new home. Having volunteered at Pax Lodge (London), another of the world centres, I already had a family all over the world, some of whom I have visited. Sangam was no different.  Everyone was so generous and inviting. Many offered up their homes after having know me for only a few days. I can’t wait to continue to travel by visiting my guiding friends.

  1. Earn your Sangam When We Shine challenge badge!

I have never met a Guide or Scout who doesn’t love a good badge. At Sangam, it was so fun to swap badges and see how unique and creative that badges from other places where. I used them to decorate my room at Sangam and remind me of the many groups of people I got to share memories with.

  1. Working side by side with Girl Scouts and Guides from all over the world to make the world a better place for everyone

Sisterhood at Sangam is not just between Scouts and Guides, but strives to include all women and girls everywhere. Working with Sangam’s community partners we established a wider community of women. As a volunteer, I loved taking Sangam participants to work with the community partners, the enthusiasm with which they planned their activities and after a slight hesitation, jump right in to teaching them. A group of girls from Malaysia were a bit wary when they learned they would mostly be working with boys to do some painting and gardening at a school. By the end of the day everyone was laughing and taking silly selfies together!

  1. The possibility to celebrate Girl Guiding and Scouting traditions

I happened to be at Sangam for World Thinking Day! The Baraht Scouts and Guides of India hosted us for a ceremony in the morning involving lots of songs and games. We planted a tree in honor of this year’s WTD theme, GROW! In the evening we connected with people all over the world through live streaming our ceremony on Facebook. It was so special to know that so many groups were celebrating WTD with us and thinking about us. We were thinking about them!

  1. You may even get to go to a wedding!

A staff member at Sangam got married while I was there and the Sangam family was invited to go to the turmeric ceremony before the wedding. It was so much fun to celebrate and experience this unique tradition and cover each other in turmeric!

  1. Trying new things

You won’t know if you like it until you try it! Whether your challenge is trying new foods, going for a hike or abseiling off a tower, these opportunities abound.

  1. Learning new things about the world

Here are a couple of things I learned: In India, a queue looks more like a crowd. Europe doesn’t have Mexican food and therefore many Europeans haven’t had a quesadilla before. Canadians sometimes say things like sauce me a pen and, eat spicy beans and fuzzy peaches.

  1. Visiting world heritage sites

In my experience, they are better in person! I had a chance to travel some outside of Pune.  The Taj Mahal!

  1. And friends that you will have for the rest of your life

I miss them! Luckily we have reunion planed for 2019!

Hopefully you now feel inspired to travel. I am happy to help out. I can come talk to your troop about planning a trip abroad or answer questions about traveling to a world centre.

***

“Look Wider” International Travel Scholarships are made possible by the Rae Ann and Richard Dougherty Look Wider International Travel Fund Endowment at Rose Community Foundation. Thanks to this generous commitment, Girl Scouts of Colorado will award scholarships to girls every year.

Learn more about Girl Scout destinations and other international travel at forgirls.girlscouts.org/travel. Applications for destinations travel are due before Thanksgiving each fall. The application for the “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarship is available from November through February and is meant for individual girl travel. Read more about Global Girl Scouting and how to get involved atgirlscoutsofcolorado.org/global-girl-scouting.

 

 

 

 

 

GPS: Girl Planning System

The GPS, Girl Planning System, is a group of innovative older girls Cadettes to Ambassadors ranging from 11 to 18-year-old who work together to plan, organize, and carry out Girl Scout functions for younger girls to change the world.

Currently, GPS is in Colorado Springs, but there is a group similar getting started in Canon City called SPLAT, Scouts Planning Team.

What does GPS do?

  • GPS is ready to try anything!  We help girls be better Girl Scouts by expanding their knowledge of helping the world and community around us with causes that need attention. We also plan and attend events as volunteers to help other groups and organizations to allow them to enjoy their outreach experiences. By doing this, we better the community and ourselves while practicing leadership skills and teamwork. This also helps us understand ourselves as strong willed, independent, courageous young women who enjoy seeing a change in girls that we guide to better their community.
  • We plan and attend Girl Scout events such as cookie rallies, fall product rallies, the Colorado Springs Mall Lock-In, and Summer Journey Day Camp.  GPS has attended and volunteered at the Pikes Peak Rodeo, VFW Post 3917, community 5k’s, and local schools.
  • GPS does so much and helps with so many events, it’s hard to recall them all! We are proud of what we do, using hard work, teamwork, and determination to create fun events where all voice/ideas are heard. GPS loves to create a fun environment where fellow Girl Scouts can express their emotions while learning lessons and boundaries. Through GPS, we have created friendships and made progress using everyone’s skills/strong points to accomplish the goals we set for ourselves; to go beyond the valley, the hill and the mountain – to go where few Girl Scouts have gone before, and feel pride in our accomplishments of doing courageous and helpful events that can make the world a better place.

Want to learn more about GPS? Interested in starting something similar in your region? Email Anita Lucero at theluceros80916@gmail.com or GSCO Girl Experience Manager Katie Singleton at Katie.Singleton@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emma Parkhurst, Centennial, “Serving students and families in need at Littleton High School”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I revitalized a clothing closet in the basement of my high school (The Lions Cupboard) and helped create a space where students from my high school and a local elementary school were able to come in and obtain clothing and other necessary items. I started by cleaning out the cupboard and gathering all items that were not usable. I brought home clothing that had stains or spots and washed it. Then, I met with the social worker at a local elementary school in order to involve their population of students and families that could benefit. A clothing drive was carried out in my neighborhood and I acquired many summer clothing and hygiene items such as shorts, swim suits, sunscreen, and towels. Then, in late May of 2017, I hosted an open house in the cupboard for families to come in and shop for clothing for summer.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Throughout this project, approximately eight families used the cupboard on a regular basis. During the open house that I hosted, two families came in and collected clothing items for the summer. I did not feel that I should inventory what each family took out, so that I could remain sensitive to the families coming in and create the most comfortable shopping experience for them.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I plan to have The Lions Cupboard become the responsibility of Littleton High School’s NHS program. I have created a brief manual explaining all of the necessary steps in keeping The Lions Cupboard functional. I have spoken with the incoming officers of NHS and they have agreed to uphold this manual and follow all of the steps to keep The Lions Cupboard going and improve it as the years continue.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

There are communities all over the United States that cannot always provide everything that they need for their families. By publishing my project on the National Honor Society website, middle and high school students from all over the country will be able to read exactly what I did to restore and upkeep The Lions Cupboard at my school in the NHS project database. This could help other students start similar programs at their own schools and create a wider national impact.

What did you learn about yourself?

From this project, I learned that to make a change or a difference in the world, you can start in your own community. You do not have to go on an international mission trip, or try to organize a group to send funds to impoverished individuals in Africa. I started in my own high school, and from there I gathered a larger community that included a local elementary school as well as my own neighborhood. I am optimistic that my project will continue to grow over the years and help many more families.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project allowed me to become more empathetic, to set goals yet remain flexible, be able to take charge of something, communicate well with adults and my peers, realize that I needed help, lead a group of people to accomplish something, and understand the impact of my own actions. All of these qualities have allowed me to grow as a person and leader, and will help me become the best possible version of myself in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that earning the Gold Award was a good way to pull together everything that I have learned in Girl Scouts over the past 12 years.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me become more aware of issues that start in my own community, and allowed me to come up with a plan to help solve them. I was an innovator by involving many National Honor Society and International Baccalaureate students at my high school, and turned my project into an ongoing service at the school.

I also furthered my leadership skills. I was able to really put myself in the shoes of families that would be using The Lions Cupboard. I had to think about their privacy, and what I would want if I were in their place. Empathy is essential for a leader, and helped me grow because leaders have to understand the feelings of those around them, and act for the best of those individuals to create a healthy environment.

Another essential aspect of this project were goals. I knew what I wanted, and set that as a goal for the cupboard. However, things did not go completely as planned and I had to adjust my vision many times. Leaders always need a direction to go in, and something to work towards to accomplish, but flexibility is key because things do not always work out as hoped. A leader also has to be able to take charge when needed, and lead others through the task at hand which is something that I was able to do throughout my project. Being able to get my ideas across is something that I have struggled with at times, but this project allowed me to work on it and better my leadership in that particular aspect. I also had to understand that I needed a lot of help. Mr. Hahn, Mr. Amonson, and all of the wonderful NHS members who volunteered to help me made this project possible. A good leader understands that things do not circulate completely around them, and the help of others is usually essential for success. I also understood the impact of my actions on the families in need, high school, elementary school, NHS, and the future of this project. This project impacted all of those groups, and hopefully set the cupboard up for a long span of success and growth.

All of these things that I learned from completing this project, allowed me to grow as a leader, and will continue to help me develop leadership skills far into my future.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

More STEM and Outdoor Journeys and badges are here

From Girl Scouts of the USA

We’re always evaluating—and enhancing—what girls do, how girls connect, and how girls grow as Girl Scouts. We listen to what girls, parents, and volunteers tell us about what they like most, and we take action to keep our program relevant and engaging. This year, we added new Journeys and badges in STEM and the outdoors!

Combined with existing STEM and outdoor programs, as well as programming that addresses life skills and entrepreneurship, these new Journeys and badges help girls empower themselves to take the lead like a Girl Scout as they accomplish amazing things.

Outdoor Journey

Anchored by the Troop Camping badge, our new Outdoor Journey will strengthen girls’ outdoor skills and ignite their interest in environmental stewardship. Girls will also complete a Take Action project.

STEM Journeys

Engineering: Think Like an Engineer. Girls discover how to think like an engineer by participating in hands-on design challenges and completing a Take Action project.

Computer Science: Think Like a Programmer. Girls learn how programmers solve problems as they (girls) participate in interactive computational-thinking activities and complete a Take Action project.

Outdoor STEM: Think Like a Citizen Scientist. Girls practice the scientific method by undertaking a citizen science project. They make observations, collect data, and work with scientists who provide feedback on research and findings. Girls also complete a Take Action project.

Badges

Engineering | Robotics: Girls design their own robots after learning how they’re built and programmed. “Unplugged” activities allow girls to earn badges without buying kits.

Engineering | Mechanical Engineering: Girls complete hands-on engineering activities, such as building and testing rollercoasters, race cars, and gliders.

Girls’ Choice | Troop Camping: Get ready for fun, adventure, and challenge in the great outdoors with the winning Girls’ Choice badge for 2017.

Daisy Badges: Two new Daisy badges, Outdoor Art Maker and Good Neighbor, give Daisies a chance to get in on the creativity and discover all about their school, city or town, and state!

Check out the all-new Badge Explorer for details on every badge a Girl Scout can earn.

Having trouble accessing this new content in VTK? Contact your volunteer support specialist for help. Don’t know who your VSS is? Email inquiry@gscolorado.org.

Are you an experienced Girl Scout traveler?

Image result for girl scout travel

Calling all travel experts! We are seeking girls, adult leaders, or troops to be GSCO “travel ambassadors” and share their knowledge, expertise, and lessons learned through Girl Scout travel. If you are an expert in money-earning ideas for travel, World Centers, girl-led travel planning and logistics, destinations, or anything else related to Girl Scout travel- we want to hear from you!

 

If you have traveled through Girl Scouts and are interested in being a resource to other girls and leaders, or helping to promote Girl Scout travel in general, please sign up through the link below. We will then reach out to you with upcoming travel ambassador opportunities.

 

https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/gscotravelambassadorsignup

 

Questions? Contact Anna Danila Outdoor & Travel Program Manager at http://anna.danila@gscolorado.org