Category Archives: Silver Award Honorees

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2017 Highest Awards booklet: Now available online

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Nearly 1,800 Girl Scouts, families, and friends celebrated this year’s 1,400 Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients at five regional celebrations across the state throughout late April and early May. These young women have taken charge to identify issues in their community and develop and implement original plans to create positive change. We couldn’t be more proud of their accomplishments!

Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado, spoke at all five celebrations. These are some of her favorite events of the year because they are the only times she gets to be in the room with so many Highest Awards recipients at once.

Sarah Greichen, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize winner, and National Young Woman of Distinction, was the emcee in Pueblo, Loveland, and Denver and a keynote speaker in Pikes Peak.

Jessica Mills, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, was the emcee in Pikes Peak while Shauna Clemmer, a Gold Award recipient and current member of the Western Slope Gold Award Committee, was the emcee in Grand Junction.

The Highest Awards Celebrations are incredibly special events where girls are recognized among their family and fellow Girl Scouts for their achievements. Additionally, this is a special time for younger girls to see older girls in action and get inspired to go for their Silver and/or Gold Awards.

Check out the electronic version of our 2017 Highest Awards booklet online (http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/dam/girlscoutsofcolorado/documents/GSCO_2017_HA_Booklet.pdf) and view our “Best of Highest Awards 2017” photo album on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/albums/72157679203803063/page1).

Cadettes from Troop 2551 help out at Terolyn Horse Rescue

Submitted by Jennifer Harrison

Metro Denver

Aurora

Cadette Girl Scouts from Troop 2551 wanted to earn their Silver Award by helping out animals, so we found Terolyn Horse Rescue in Elizabeth. Terolyn is run almost exclusively by Teri Allen, who rescues horses from dire situations, rehabilitates them, and finds them new homes. Teri works very hard and there were plenty of projects around her ranch for our girls. The girls decided to help by photographing and inventorying a trailer full of donations and building a set of obstacles to help Teri with training horses. The girls found plenty of time to love on some of Teri’s wonderful adoptable horses!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Silver Award with Shiloh House

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Submitted by Lisa Svede

Metro Denver

Centennial

Congratulations to Hailey L. of Cadette Troop 60762 for earning her Silver Award this year. Hailey was recognized at the Highest Awards Celebration in Denver on May 7, 2017 for the work she did partnering with Shiloh House. Shiloh House offers specialized 24-hour care for youth between the ages of 5 to 18 experiencing severe behavioral and emotional issues. Placed in home-like settings, youth receive intensive therapeutic intervention to address behaviors and issues that impact their daily participation in the community. When Hailey reached out to Shiloh House, she learned they were in great need of lightly used or new towels, blankets, sheets, and new socks. Upon learning this, Hailey reached out to her community with a video on her mother’s Facebook page; through community websites; by asking her school to put in a newsletter; by asking her church to put in the bulletin; and making the collection drive known to all of the troops in her K-8 sister troop. For several weeks, Hailey collected items from the community. She held a collection night with her sister troops where she spoke to the troops about Shiloh House and her Silver Award project. Hailey delivered the many donated items she collected to Shiloh House in February. Congratulations, Hailey!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Silver Award working with CASA

Submitted by Lisa Svede

Metro Denver

Centennial

Lauren, with Cadette Troop 60762 of the Green Meadows Service Unit, enjoyed earning her Silver Award by working with CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children).

Over the summer, Lauren decided to go through her stuffed animal collection and donate over 50 like-new stuffed animals to a charity. Her younger sister volunteered to donate 20 of her own stuffed animals. When looking for a charity in which to donate the stuffed animals, she learned that the organization Love Does It was planning to donate 100 backpacks filled with supplies for the children of CASA. Lauren asked if she could donate her animals to the Backpack Project.

She then decided to contact her dentist and her parents’ dentist to see if they would donate toothbrushes, toothpaste, and floss. Dr. Paul Miyamoto donated a large supply of toothbrushes, travel size toothpastes, and floss to Lauren’s cause.

Lauren then decided to go through all of her books and sister’s books; they donated close to 50 books for the Backpack Project.

Once Lauren had these supplies, she got together with the co-founders of Love Does It for an afternoon and helped to stuff the 100 backpacks with the supplies she provided and other supplies that were donated by generous people in the community.

A few days after stuffing all of the backpacks, Lauren and Love Does It donated over 100 backpacks to the children of CASA. While there, Lauren learned that CASA Colorado in Aurora works with more than 800 foster and kinship care children a year! While receiving a tour, she was shown the gift closet where children can come and select a gift from the closet on their birthday. Seeing that there were not 800 gifts in the closet, Lauren decided to hold a toy drive in her community and within her sister troop to see if she could collect new toys for the CASA children. In December, Lauren was able to donate over 75 new toys to CASA to be placed in the gift closet.

Finally, during cookie sales Lauren’s troop decided to make CASA their Hometown Hero after learning more about the organization from Lauren’s Silver Award work. The eight Girl Scouts in her troop who sold cookies donated and delivered 46 boxes of cookies to CASA in April.

Lauren enjoyed learning about CASA and meeting the hard-working and caring volunteers while earning her Silver Award. She enjoyed helping an organization that helps children.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

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Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients celebrated in Denver

Nearly 1,000 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center on May 7, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Colorado Springs

Nearly 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion in Colorado Springs on May 5, 2017 to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

Jessica Mills, 2016 Gold Award recipient, served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked about her own journey to earn her Highest Awards and encouraged all the girls to continue to make a difference in their communities.

“I encourage you to reflect on the person you were at the beginning of your project, and look at the person you are today. I hope you find that you have grown confident in your ability to make a difference in the world,” she said. “Completing my Gold Award project made me find who I truly was – it defined my character. Gold Awardees, I encourage you to look back on your experiences in Girl Scouts. Your commitment to making the world a better place has instilled courage, confidence, and character within you.”

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen was the celebration’s keynote speaker. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing Highest Awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Bronze and Silver Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Grand Junction

Nearly one hundred Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on April 30, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 35 on the Western Slope and in Southwestern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last year, nine girls on the Western Slope and in Southwestern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

Shauna Clemmer, a Gold Award recipient, and current Gold Award Mentor for the Western Slope, served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked about her own journey in Girl Scouts and wished all the girls the best in their pursuit of the highest achievements in Girl Scouting.

Sandy Jackson, a First Class recipient, current Gold Award Mentor, and Professor of Anthropology, Archaeology, and Sustainable Studies at Colorado Mountain College served as the keynote speaker. She spoke about her experiences in Girl Scouting from earning her First Class (what we now call the Gold Award), recycling and planting trees, to traveling the world and visiting Our Cabaña, one of the WAGGS World Centers in Mexico.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Silver Award project: “Inspiring Literacy Through Theater”

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

The girls of Troop 70720 have started finishing up their Silver Award projects and Aislyn was the first!

Her project entitled “Inspiring Literacy Through Theater” was a great success! She wrote a play, acted, directed, and created all the props and costumes! She performed it for some preschool classes and then donated the script to acting studios for kids and preschools for potential use in the future! Inspired by her own love of theater, this was truly such a great project!

Congrats Aislyn! We are super proud of you!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Embassy Suites by Hilton in Loveland on April 23, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Before the celebration, Stephanie Foote presented Gold Award recipient and 2017 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni with an engraved silver medallion from The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma, from Arvada and senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, was named one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. This is a nationwide program honoring young people for outstanding acts of volunteerism. As a State Honoree, Emma will receive $1,000, the medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip in early May to Washington, D.C. She will join top honorees from other states and the District of Columbia for four days of national recognition events. During the trip, 10 students will be named America’s top youth volunteers of 2017.

 

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Bronze and Silver Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Pueblo

Nearly one hundred Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Center for American Values in Pueblo on April 21, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 24 in Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last two years, 18 girls across Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.