Category Archives: Silver Award Honorees

G.I.R.L. Stories: Run for Cake

Submitted by Maria C.

Metro Denver

Arvada

I started a 5k road race four years ago called Run for Cake for my Silver Award. Since then, the race has exploded and many people have learned more about the specific needs that are supported by Community Table, previously known as Arvada Community Food Bank. The race supports a small elementary school nearby through the registration fee. We work alongside Community Table’s backpack program. The program supplies kids with food on the weekends in discrete ways. The registration fee is a box of cake mix, candles, and frosting, as well as $5. All is collected and I buy many, many “birthday bags” and donate all the supplies to Community Table. From there, Community Table drops off the donations at Kullerstrand Elementary  to give to students. Each student is called up to the office over morning announcements, receives a birthday bag, and gets their picture taken with the principal. A “birthday bag” consists of a box of cake mix, candles, and frosting. Every kid deserves cake.

I am a G.I.R.L.!

Go-getter: My troop leader Sheryl Blish has been one of the most influential women in my life. She has constantly encouraged me to become versed in everything that comes up in my life. You traveled on a road trip with your family this summer? Where? What places did you go? She never asked, but the way she phrased her questions implored you to want to look on a map, do some research, and figure out where you went. Not only has she pushed us in our knowledge and care for others, but she has also constantly encouraged us to physically go get our dreams. I personally believe that even though she is a very busy women, she never stops dreaming.

Innovator: My troop leaders have always encouraged us to think outside the box! Can’t find that missing tent peg? You’re smart and very intelligent, but you’re also young and a dreamer. Think something up. Look at what’s around you. Maybe you can find something in the camping supplies or a pointy stick that will make it work for the night. Maybe we even have an extra because as Girl Scouts we are always prepared.

Risk-taker: For one of our bridging ceremonies, our troop voted to ride zip lines. That was kind of intense for those of us who do not love heights. The dynamic duo of both Judy Curtis and Sheryl Blish gave us a balance of tough love and kind words. They helped so many of us, especially me, conquer our fears with such audacious boldness we couldn’t help but get excited. They have taught us when it’s appropriate to look back to see if you can help someone out and when to look forward to improve those around you as well as yourself.

Leader: I have become the person I am today mostly through the weekly Girl Scout meeting our troop held. Each week a different girl would be in charge of leading a meeting. She would show up 15 minutes before all the other girls and meet with the head troop leader Sweet Sweet Sheryl Blish. She would give us a good and thorough run-down of what the meeting needed to accomplish. We had a notecard and her sitting next to us but other than that, it was our job to run the whole shebang smoothly while maintaining control of the room. As we proceed to get older she would let us have more and more freedom until we almost did not need her for the meeting at all. But by that time we realized we had become such great friends with our troop leaders we wanted them to be there.
My troop leaders are the best women around.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

G.I.R.L.s build fence for Silver Award project

Submitted by Laura Smith

Metro Denver

Littleton

Over this last year, Troop 3227 planned, designed, and built a fence around a 30’x 60′ garden at Goddard Middle School in Littleton. This was no easy task! The six girls divided the tasks so they could meet with the school, finalize a design, get a supply list, work on getting donations from Home Depots, Lowes, and the Elks in Littleton, and then building the fence over two weekends with the help of their families and parents. The girls learned how to coordinate such a huge project with so many players and they learned how to use tools safely as they built the fence. It was hard work that paid off. This fence will last the school around 25-30 years and it’ll be a legacy the girls can be proud of passing on.

The six girls exemplified what being a G.I.R.L. means. They took on a project that was not easy to accomplish and their go-getting attitude helped them get there. The skills the girls learned will go a long way in helping cement their leadership, risk-taking, and innovation. It was amazing to see the girls grow over this last year as they worked on this project!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Silverthorne

Nearly 100 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Silverthorne Pavilion in Silverthorne on May 11, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 25 in the Mountain Communities region earned the Bronze Award. 10 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and three became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

G.I.R.L.s start running club to earn Silver Award

To earn their Silver Award, Girl Scout Cadettes Addison, Adie, and Scarlet of Centennial started an after school running club at their elementary school alma mater, Carl Sandburg Elementary School, in the fall.  The program was such a success that they were instrumental in its continuation this spring. The girls even secured a grant for their club through Kids Run the Nation. They are now serving as volunteers in the program they created.  Their model can also be easily transferrable to other elementary schools wanting to start a running club for their students.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Bronze and Silver Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Grand Junction

More than 100 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on May 6, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 40 in the Western Slope and Southwestern Colorado region earned the Bronze Award. 13 girls across the Western Slope and Southwestern Colorado region earned the prestigious Silver Award.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Katie Otto served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“Girl Scouts is an amazing community and organization. The skills that you learn through Girl Scouts will give you the skills to succeed further in life. Girl scouts teaches girls: courage, confidence, and character,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at highest awards celebration in Colorado Springs

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Penrose House at El Pomar in Colorado Springs on May 4, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 191 in the Pikes Peak region earned the Bronze Award. 105 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and six became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Megan Burnett served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“All the skills you learn in Girl Scouts, through the meetings you plan and the badges you earn, are all intended to prepare you for the future,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Silver Award project: Free Little Library

For their Silver Award project, Girl Scouts from Troop 14013 Megan T. and Hailey T. in Grand Junction designed, built, and installed a Free Little Library at Lincoln Park. The girls love reading and wanted to share that love with their community. The library was immediately used by children and adults.

Mandy Beilman was at the girls’ event because she has been visiting Free Little Libraries around the country. GSCO asked her a few questions about her personal connection to Free Little Libraries.

When did you get started doing this?

I remember seeing Little Free Libraries in online articles, but never seeing one in person. I saw my first one in the summer of 2016 in Homer, Alaska. My family was there for a deep sea fishing trip and I spotted one with a mermaid on it. I swapped out the book I had brought along for the trip with a new read. After that, I started noticing them more places and being intentional about seeking them out.

Where have you experienced these?

In many places! I’ve visited several in Anchorage, AK, as well as the one in Homer. The farthest east I’ve gone is Topeka, KS. I plan to continue seeking them out whenever I got to a new place. My daughter and I like to take photos of them and I have an album on Facebook. My favorite ones so far are the ones that I find by accident. There’s a bit of magic in finding one and seeing what books it holds!

What is your interest in LFL?

I’m a high school English teacher, so literacy is important to me. I love the idea of giving out free books, it’s a great community service! Plus, I think the libraries are cute; I enjoy seeing all of the different styles. I can’t wait to put one in my front yard.  (As soon as I sign the closing papers on my first home).

What made you come to this one?

I saw the girls putting it together and thought I’d come over and visit! I’ve never been the first patron before, my daughter and I really enjoyed that.  The one the girls designed is beautiful, and it has a perfect location, right next to a park.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Denver

More than 1,000 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center in Denver on April 29, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and more than 400 in the Denver Metro region earned the Bronze Award. Nearly 200 girls across the Denver Metro region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 23 girls across the region earned the Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2017 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the 2017 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I learned how to be responsible for what I said and did. I found something I believed in and learned how to speak up for my beliefs. The Gold Award also taught me how to not only work with a team, but lead a team,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Troop 60474 earns highest awards

Submitted by Cherie Piccone

Metro Denver

Littleton

In their quest for their Bronze and Silver Awards, the girls of Troop 60474 identified the need for a summer food bank for kids in their own community. The girls have always participated in community service projects at shelters by preparing and serving food. When planning for their award projects, they felt passionate about helping kids from their own community. They were shocked to learn that children from their own school struggled on weekends with access to food. The girls didn’t realize that without access to school breakfast/lunch programs during the weekend, the last meal low-resource children may have would be lunch on Friday until they returned to school on Monday morning. The girls were concerned about the obstacles these kids would face during the summer and decided to take action. They reached out to several food banks, but discovered limited resources during the summer and decided to create their own summer food bank.

With two Juniors and 11 Cadettes in the same troop, the girls broke off into smaller, more focused groups to make their goal a reality. Each small group addressed different aspects of establishing the food bank. For example, three girls were responsible for procuring sites for the food drives and organizing the sign-ups. Another small group was responsible for proper storage, sorting, and labeling of food. Another group was responsible for creating a well-balanced, weekly selection of foods. (i.e. three fruits, three veggies, three proteins). They also created a spreadsheet that organized what food, which families, and the dates. Another group worked with the procurement of the pick-up site and arranged the sign-up for weekly drop-offs.

They could partner with a local church to arrange for weekly drop-offs. It was important to the girls that the recipients and themselves remained anonymous. Because the church had limited space, the girls had to arrange for weekly drop-offs over the course of the whole summer. Not only were the families happy to have the weekly donations, they discovered that this church could help them longterm. Many of the families found another resource to help them. Because of this, their summer food bank continued to help these families even when school resumed.

As the leader for Troop 60476, it was difficult to take on the Bronze and Silver Awards with such a large and mixed level troop. I am confident that the work these young ladies completed made an impact in our community where needs are not always easily identified. I am amazed and proud of their accomplishments.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Embassy Suites in Loveland on April 22, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 190 in Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. 32 girls across Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award. Seven girls across Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout, National Young Woman of Distinction, and winner of the 2016 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.