Category Archives: Silver Award Honorees

Troop 74546’s Silver Award project

Submitted by Anna Boyle

Northern & Northeastern CO

Loveland

We are Troop 74546 in Loveland and for our Silver Award project, we painted inspirational quotes on bathroom stalls in bathrooms at an elementary school. We picked an elementary school that one of us went to and we made a presentation. In the presentation, we included how, what, when, and where we are painting. We presented to the PTA and the principal at Cottonwood Plains Elementary School. They allowed us to do it and we got to work. We went and got paint donated from a Home Depot store. We spent two days painting and making it perfect. We put a sealer on it and it was finished. The next day, the kids got to come in for Back to School Night and see our work. All of the teachers and students love the stalls and they were excited for the new year with newly painted stalls.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Silver Award project: Hampden Academy makeover

Submitted by Jessica Raugust

Metro Denver

Aurora

This summer, girls from Troop 64175 completed their Silver Award. These young ladies contacted an alternative school used by Aurora Mental Health. This is a multi-grade facility that provides therapy programs in a safe environment. When the girls arrived, they found several rooms that were in rough condition. The paint was peeling, there were holes in the walls, and carpet was ripped and stained. It was badly in need of a makeover. Troop 64175 decided that these kids needed someone to show them that they were loved.

The girls spent months earning the money and gathering ideas from both staff and the students. They decided to remodel a self-timeout room and the cafeteria. The girls organized their community and many volunteers in order to repair the walls, repaint, put in new carpet, and lay laminate flooring. They purchased new tables, carts, microwaves, and more. They presented staff with positive incentive gift cards and snacks for the highly dedicated staff. The G.I.R.L.s understood how fortunate they were to attend their school and that not everyone has the same learning environment. They learned that they could take an active role in creating positive changes in their community.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze and Silver Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Western Colorado

More than a dozen Girl Scouts, along with their families and friends, gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on May 19, 2019, to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 14 Girl Scouts in the Western Colorado region earned the Bronze Award. 15 girls across the Western Colorado region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award..

Gold Award Girl Scout and current Gold Award mentor Heidi Ragsdale served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Silverthorne

Nearly 30 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at Silverthorne Pavilion in Silverthorne on May 9, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 26 Girl Scouts in the Mountain Communities region earned the Bronze Award. 18 girls across the Mountain Communities region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Silver Award project: Community garden

Girl Scout Cadettes Lizzy and Alina from Littleton wanted to help both people AND the environment. For their Silver Award project, they are working to build a community garden at their former elementary school, Colorow Elementary School. The vegetables that will be grown in the garden will be donated to a nearby food bank. Lizzy and Alina hope the garden will also give students at the school an opportunity to learn about gardening, composting, helping their community, and more.

“As Girl Scouts and teenagers, we strive to be the best people that we can be. When creating our project for our Silver Award, we had different ideas and merged them into one project. Alina’s idea was to help people in need, but bring it one step further and provide people with fresh produce at the local food bank at the neighborhood church. Lizzy’s idea was to help save the environment through educating kids the importance of doing your part in protecting the environment, as well as help the environment physically like composting,” wrote Lizzy and Alina.

The girls are using money earned through the Girl Scout Cookie Program, along with generous donations from the community, to build their garden. In fact, the girls received more donations than originally expected, especially cinder blocks, to make the raised garden beds. Now, they need other need other supplies, like dirt.

Lizzy and Alina also collected old t-shirts and remade them into cotton reusable bags so volunteers can take the produce from the garden to the food bank.

Special thanks to Reporter Jeff Todd of CBS4/KCNC-TV in Denver for helping Lizzy and Alina spread the word about their project and the need for donations.

If you’re interested in helping Lizzy and Alina with their Silver Award project, email inquiry@gscolorado.org.

Silver Award project: Activity/Sensory board

Submitted by Shannon Michel

Metro Denver

Aurora/Centennial

Cadettes Sarah R., Bianca P., Emily M., and Maren G. of Troop 4098 in Aurora/Centennial used money earned from the Girl Scout Cookie Program to complete their Silver Award project. They built an activity/sensory board for a life-skills classroom in Aurora Public Schools. These young ladies learned about working with students with special needs, creating activities based upon the students’ abilities, budgeting, teamwork, woodworking, and tool use. They presented the final project to the classroom teachers, paraprofessionals, occupational therapist, physical therapist, and school administrators on Tuesday, April 30, 2019.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold, Silver, and Bronze Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Colorado Springs

More than 75 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at the Penrose House at El Pomar in Colorado Springs on May 3, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 126 Girl Scouts in the Pikes Peak region earned the Bronze Award. 53 girls across the Pikes Peak region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

A special thank you to News5/KOAA-TV for airing photos of the event.

Gold, Silver, and Bronze Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Denver

More than 300 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center on May 5, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 565 Girl Scouts in the Metro Denver region earned the Bronze Award. 196 girls across the Metro Denver region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Gold, Silver, and Bronze Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Loveland

Nearly 80 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at Embassy Suites in Loveland on April 28, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 145 Girl Scouts in Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. 100 girls across Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Silver Award Girl Scouts meet Colorado Governor Jared Polis

Colorado Governor Jared Polis stopped by the GSCO office in Denver on April 24, 2019 to meet three Silver Award Girl Scouts from Aurora! Cadettes Chloe, Sammi, and Avery of Troop 64098 created kits filled with developmentally appropriate toys and activities for toddlers/preschoolers receiving early intervention support. They delivered the kits to the STARS Early Learning Center in Commerce City last month. After hearing about the Girl Scouts’ project, Governor Polis asked to meet them to congratulate and thank them for their efforts to make our world a better place. In addition to telling the Governor all about their project and the impact that it had,  the girls also had a chance to take a few photos with him, including some selfies. You can read more about the Girl Scouts’ project here. Congratulations again to these Silver Award Girl Scouts!