Category Archives: Highest Awards Archive

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Delaney Keeler, Colorado Springs, “The Pet Pal Program”

 

Delaney Keeler

Delaney Keeler
Colorado Springs
The Vanguard School
The Pet Pal Program

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a volunteer and education program for kids who are not old enough to volunteer at the Humane Society to complete.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I myself wanted to volunteer with the Humane Society but was not old enough. When I started working with a younger Girl Scout troop, they wanted to do a service project at the Humane Society.  Plus, my family fosters puppies until they are old enough to be adopted, so I am well aware of the problem of unwanted pets.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

Now kids can volunteer with the Humane Society with the help of their parents or another adult. Kids will not only learn how responsible pet care, how to choose some of the best options available on the pet supplies market today (pet monitors, etc), but can make a difference as well. As soon as kids become a Pet Pal then they can be contacted by the Humane Society for other volunteer programs.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I learned leadership and communication skills as well time management and flexibility.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

What I will remember most about my Gold Award is not only the hours and the hard work, but, in the end, the smiles on the girls’ faces of the Girl Scout troop I work with as we completed the requirements of this program together.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

It made me more aware of the variety of types of communication that are necessary when working with many individuals. It has definitely made me more confident. If I can complete a project such as this and not give up, it makes my dreams seem much more possible.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been a Girl Scout in three states. I have camped as a Girl Scout in four countries. I have been to Our Chalet. Plus, I am a 4th generation Girl Scout, but the first in my family to earn the Gold Award. As I become an adult, this is the best possible way to transition my role as a Girl Scout to one day being a leader just like my mom, grandma, aunt and great-grandmother.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Carly U-Ren, Grand Junction, “Memory Books for Dementia Patients”

 

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Carly U-Ren
Grand Junction
Fruita Monument High School
Memory Books for Dementia Patients

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I made beautiful Memory Books for a dementia unit in my hometown. These books are used to help spark memories in the patients, and are used by staff, families and volunteers. I volunteered with the patients to keep them busy doing exercise groups, games and socializing.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I volunteered at a nursing home and saw how board the patients were and that they needed something to do. I did some research and found out about Memory Books and made them for the patients. I also volunteered, when possible, and worked with the patients doing different activities to keep them active and engaged.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

I provided five books and four baby dolls to a local center, and I got a local school to continue making these books for other dementia centers in my area. I also recruited other students from the area to volunteer at the dementia center so the patients would have more visitors to help keep them busy.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I learned about dementia. I learned to be assertive in asking for donations for my books and to keep my project going forward. I am now more comfortable talking in front of groups and to different business people. The project also taught me to budget my money.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will remember working with the dementia patients the most.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

It will help me be more confident and to not give up when you are pursuing something important.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award project teaches you to be independent and to pursue something you are passionate about. It teaches you to make a difference in the world.

Congratulations to the Bronze Award Recipients March 2014!

Bronze_Award_Starburst_HRAll of the Colorado Girl Scouts who have achieved Girl Scouts Highest Awards this year have done amazing things! With your accomplishments, you have shown yourselves to be leaders in your community and advocates for others. Girl Scouts of Colorado is very proud of you all and the example you set!

Individual or combined Service Units are encouraged to plan celebrations honoring the highest awards recipients. Please contact your local Program Support Specialist for additional support.

Bronze Award Recipients March 2014

Troop42109 – Colorado Springs
Abigail Humphries
Ava Collins
Blakeley Bennett
Elizabeth Gumper
Ellie Schueler
Emma Popkin
Gabriella Greenberg
Hope Earls
Katie Weyant
Kellyn Pattee
Kennedy Wriedt
Mackenzie Walton
MyLinh Merkert
Ruby Boswell
Sarah Wrubel

Troop43107 – Monument
Kaitlyn Ketchell
Sarah Hinton
Zoe Johnson

Troop43580 – Colorado Springs
Jaylee Hepner

Troop44189 – Colorado Springs
Alison Russo
Allison Graham
Ashton McKnight-Wilson
Avery Lenocker
Heidi Johnson
Jaiden Jacobs
Jaycee Jacobs
Mallory Hajek
Sadye Hughes
Samantha Gregerson
Scarlet Lenocker
Sydney Hidalgo

Troop53289 – Arvada
Alyssa Davis
Audrey Solis
Cora Holguin
Emilyann Owens
Jocelyn Brown
Kaela Bredine
Katherine Price
Mary Charlotte Landvik
Molly Butler
Rebecca Stankiewicz

Troop53406 – Commerce City
Abigail Taugner
Emma Bourgeois
Gracelyn Adair
Isabella Heinmiller
Jaelyn Rainwater
Jerray Sterling
Kalene Nissen
Lauren Restrepo
Leah Sansom
Lydia Jimmerson
Madison Speck
Sydney Worden

Troop54373 – Denver
Claudia Horning
Ella Brink
Ellie Swigle
Lyndsey Snowtala
Sarah Young
Skylar Cole
Sofia Martikonis

Troop62802 – Aurora
Aura Delgado-Chacon
Kacey McCutchen
Lucy Herrick
Madison McCutchen
Megan Vazquez
Olivia Calderon

Troop72147 – Fort Collins
Avantika Malvankar
Charlotte Gregg
Dakota Lavigne
Ella Gernert
Jessica Robinson
Maile Tinker
Megan Grube
Meghan Williams
Nicole Clack
Olivia French

Troop73392 – Longmont
Amber Reichenberg
Ashley Reichenberg
Beatrice Lin
Courtney Haedike
Dina Mercier
Emma Stenner
Gayathri Budamgunta
Haeydn Sais
Kaelin Smith
Kensington Dobbins
Sophia Manning
Willow Good

Troop73961 – Louisville
Alexis Stone
Aurora Martinez
Chloe McCormick
Cynthia Vander Meyden
Erin Rosenthal
Katie Glass
Kavita Kellow
Kaylin Denny
Kya Irish
Leila Lauer
Maya Baumann
Miranda McCoy
Natalie Sargent
Nicole Schnettler
Sruti Durbha

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Ashley Jones, Parker, “The Great Escape”

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Ashley Jones
Parker
Cherokee Trail High School
The Great Escape

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a library for the education center at Urban Peak, a homeless teens shelter.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

Ever since I was little I have loved to read. I knew from the beginning that I wanted my Gold Award to deal with books. My original goal was to create a library for a hospital but found that there were a lot of obstacles regarding the sanitation of books. So I called different non-profit organizations all over Denver. When I found Urban Peak, I then began to form the specifics of the project around their needs.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

A library isn’t just a collection of books. It can be a common meeting place and a resource for growth. The education center provides GED classes for youth using Urban Peak’s facilities, and I wanted to inspire those youth to pick up something besides a textbook and to discover all the places that reading can take you. Hence why I named my project “The Great Escape.”

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I learned a lot about communication. Not just communication with people but also my community.

As a leader I learned that often it is better to contact volunteers in person. That way they know that their support is important to you and are less likely to bail last minute on  a project.

Leaders are in charge of organizing everything and answering questions. I found that by not putting myself to work in one specific group on the day of I was of more use to all the people who were helping me. This allowed me to bounce between the people sorting existing books, the people putting reading levels on my donated books, and communicating with the Urban Peak employee who donated his time on a Sunday to open the Education Center up for me and my project

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will most remember the Saturday that we went into Urban Peak to put everything together. I was slowly seeing my dream come together right in front of my eyes with shelves stuffed to the brim with books.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

I will continue to grow in the future due to this project because of the experience I now have. Earning my Gold Award put me in a select group of young women who have successfully earned this honor. Earning the Gold Award requires a high level of responsibility as well as an extremely large amount of time and organization. I feel I am more prepare to take on responsibilities by myself in the professional world. I have Girl Scout friends who are considering earning their Gold Award as well as younger Girl Scouts who are just considering earning their Gold and Silver Awards, and because of my experience I can give encouragement and wisdom on things that went well and went poorly. I know how many volunteers are needed to carry out a Gold Award, so as opportunities arise to help others in the future I will take action to help them through volunteer work and spreading information about their cause and Gold Award.

On a more personal side I will always remember the great feeling of pride that comes when you take an idea and turn it into something that will benefit the community and people around you.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Although the Gold Award can be very time consuming and frustrating at times, seeing the finished project taught me that when you finish what you start the rewards are unlimited.

My whole Girl Scouts experience was leading up to this project. The relationships I formed and the skills I developed over the years were preparing me for the real-world experience of leadership, creativity and passion that is the Gold Award.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emily Calzolari, Longmont, “Helmet Helper”

Emily Calzolari

Emily Calzolari
Longmont
Mead High School
Helmet Helper

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I provided helmets for the Longmont Ice Pavilion and educated Learn-to-Skate parents and participants of the dangers of skating. Through word of mouth, posters, flyers and a Facebook page, the dangers of figure skating where addressed and proper safety techniques were put to the test.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

As a competitive figure skater and figure skating instructor, safety is my number one priority for me. But some people don’t know how dangerous it can be. I felt as though it was my responsibility as a Girl Scout Ambassador, a figure skating instructor and an athlete, to educate those who wanted to participate in the sport of figure skating.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

After my Gold Award I noticed almost all the participants were wearing helmets. It was an amazing thing to see, and I was amazed at what my Gold Award had done.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

Public speaking skills were definitely involved, and because of my Gold Award, I am a well-spoken young lady who can convey her thoughts and ideas with ease.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The kids faces! When I first started teaching at the Longmont Ice Pavilion many kids where scared to let go of the wall because they would fall and hurt themselves. But now that they are equipped with safety techniques and safer equipment (helmets), they venture far from the wall without falling, and this is helping them improve their ice skating skills.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Earning my Gold Award has taught me a lot about perseverance and determination. Many people kept shutting me down and telling me that none of this would be possible. But I was determined to make a difference in my community.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning your Gold Award is like going to the Olympics. It’s a long, hard journey that only few can attend. But if you are determined, and work hard, anything is possible. To be a Girl Scout Ambassador and to have achieved my Girl Scout Gold Award is something I am proud of, knowing only 1% of girls achieve it. It makes me proud to know that I have impacted my community and will continue to do so through my project’s sustainability.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Taylor Hale, Boulder, “Music on the Brain”

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Taylor Hale
Boulder
Niwot High School
Music on the Brain

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I provided some relief to Alzheimer’s patients through my therapeutic music program, which also offered company to these lonely nursing home residents.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

Music has the potential to unlock otherwise lost memories for Alzheimer’s patients and temporarily relieve cognitive and behavioral symptoms. I plan to study neuroscience in college and this was a great introduction to mental illnesses and treatment.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

I provided therapeutic music sessions and a person to talk to for the residents. In the future, my project will mostly have the impact of education about the benefits of similar projects via the project’s blog and newspaper article.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I improved my communication skills and gained self-confidence in situations outside of my comfort zone.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will remember the people and the experiences I had at the home. The residents were some of the sweetest people I have ever met, and I am glad I was able to talk to them and hear their stories.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Going into college as a pre-med/neuroscience major and having this background with mental illness reminds me why what I want to do is so important and has the potential to impact so many people.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think that my Gold Award serves as a capstone to my Girl Scout experience. I was able to do my own project, specifically in my own area of interest. It also served as a transition project from high school into college.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Nicole Burkhalter, Westminster/Broomfield, “Teen Drinking and Driving Awareness”

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Nicole Burkhalter
Westminster/Broomfield
Arvada West High School
Teen Drinking and Driving Awareness

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my project, I put together an assembly for the junior and senior classes at my high school to educate them on the dangers of drinking and driving. I also created lesson plans as a follow-up to the assembly which allowed students to use impairment goggles as a simulation for being drunk.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I chose this project because I had attended a program at the Anschutz Center titled Preventing Alcohol Related Trauma in Youth. I learned so much about the dangers of drinking and driving and I realized that many teenagers don’t understand the consequences.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My project reached more people than I thought it would. I educated the students and staff at my school on drinking and driving, but I also included texting and driving. Since my project, the number of accidents around my school related to texting and driving has decreased.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I gained stronger communication skills through my project. I felt more comfortable talking to complete strangers to ask for help on my project and I was able to stand in front of more than 800 people to educate them on the consequences of deciding to drink and drive.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will remember the lives I touched most from my Gold Award project. During my assembly, there was not one dry eye in the audience. I truly feel like I made a much bigger impact in everyone’s lives than I ever thought I could.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

It will help in public speaking and organization. It took a lot of skills to organize such an event with a lot of people involved, and I think those skills will become very handy as I continue into college and my future career as a nurse.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think it’s an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I was able to prove that I can accomplish anything I set my mind to. I’ve never took on such an important leadership role until now, and I now I know that I can make a difference if I set my mind to it. All of the little leadership roles I took on through camps and rendezvous definitely prepared me for my Gold Award and being able to advocate for myself.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Anne Martens, Monument, “Passion for Pits”

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Anne Martens
Monument
Lewis Palmer High School
Passion for Pits

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project I promoted education of Pit Bulls through the internet and presentations. Also I assisted a Pit Bull Rescue site by building new dog shelters and donating needed supplies.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

Pit Bulls have a personal connection to me because I have a rescue dog. When I take him out I see that people are judging him based on his breed. I did this Gold Award project to help correct this misconception people have and help Pit Bulls in need.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My project made a strong impact on the lives of Pit Bulls. By educating people on this breed, I corrected myths and shared facts. When people have actuate information about Pit Bulls they are able to accept these dogs for the loving animals they are. In addition, by helping the rescue shelter I was able to better the lives of the dogs at the shelter. A large piece of my project was education and knowledge continues forever.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

The topic I chose was a controversial subject in society today. A main skill I learned was how to approach people and how to share my ideas in a positive way. I was blessed to have encountered people with open hearts and minds. Perseverance was key to help me realize and complete my goals.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The strongest memory I will take away from this experience was when I went to the shelter to deliver the supplies and houses. I will never forget the dogs that were there. Having an opportunity to do this type of work at a shelter helped me to understand that I can do this type work for the rest of my life. Every person can make a difference.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

I have a great sense of accomplishment from completing my project. By knowing the magnitude  of my project and the fact that I did it at
16 years old, I have realized the great potential I possess. This will help me in the future because it taught me that I am a strong young lady and am capable of anything I put my mind to.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Having an opportunity to do an individualized project allowed me to grow personally in so many ways. My project also connected me with my community, and people were very supportive of this project. I feel that two main principles taught by Girl Scouts are leadership and community service. My project allowed me to grow in both of these areas. This was a mission that came from my heart.

Castle Rock Girl Scouts designate new state symbol

Girl Scout Troop 2518

View more photos from the signing

This afternoon, Friday, March 7, at a ceremony at the State Capitol, Gov. Hickenlooper signed in to law the claret cup as the state’s official cactus. This designation was made possible by the hard work of 6th grade Girl Scout Troop 2518 from Castle Rock. They have been working for several years with State Rep. Carole Murray to have Colorado adopt this new state symbol. The troop has learned a lot about the legislative process and even testified, along with their project consultants from the Denver Botanic Gardens and the Colorado Cactus and Succulent Society, in front a House Committee in January. Their work has also earned the girls the Girl Scout Silver Award, which is a leadership award earned by working to meet a community need. It is not the first time in recent history that Colorado Girl Scouts have worked to name a new state symbol. In 2004 a Girl Scout troop from Lakewood designated Yule Marble as the state rock.

(The best moments of the ceremony: The Girl Scouts brought the Governor homemade “cactus cupcakes” (a big hit) and one of the Girl Scouts also asked to take a “selfie” with the Governor after the signing (wonder if we can get retweeted 3 million times ;)).)

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governor selfie

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Monica Weller, Westminster, “Exchange Student Community Program”

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Monica Weller
Westminster
Denver Center for International Studies
Exchange Student Community Program

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I planned and participated in monthly events alongside Rotary Youth Exchange students.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

As a former exchange student, I wanted to create a fun environment in which students can feel comfortable and safe.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

Not only did I create a community get-together for students to connect at, but I also made students more aware of what Colorado has to offer. I’d like to think that these students will be inspired to start communities of their own when they go back to their own countries.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I gained a better sense of time-management, leadership abilities, how to interact with a diverse range of individuals, and the knowledge of how to set up, plan, and make reservations for events.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The friendships. I love meeting new people, and being able to create a community that allows this to happen is fantastic!

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

I’ve learned how to better interact with all kinds of people! I now have a better idea of how to manage planning and knowing how to improvise when plans go awry. This project taught me the importance of creating communities that can bring people together, which is something I want to continue promoting in the future. Whatever I end up doing, I will have stronger leadership skills to support me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

It gave my Girl Scout experience something to focus around. Rather than a mishmash of activities, the Gold Award brought a central idea of responsibility to my experience. In turn, this helped me to take more pride (if that’s possible!) in myself as a Girl Scout Ambassador.