Category Archives: Highest Awards Archive

Gold Award Girl Scout Bailey Stokes awarded Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship

Gold Award Girl Scout Bailey Stokes of Buena Vista is the 2018 recipient of the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship. She earned her Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, earlier this summer for creating a nature program that will be sustained by teachers in her community.

Johanna Farrar’s husband and children started this scholarship in 2015 to celebrate all of her accomplishments, particularly those within the Girl Scout community. Born in London, England and raised in a small village on the south coast of England, Johanna was a Girl Guide in her childhood. She was also the youngest ever to have achieved the Queen’s Guide Award at that time, the English equivalent of the Girl Scout Gold Award. After earning a software engineering degree from Loughborough University, Johanna moved to New Jersey to work for Bell Labs. In 1985, she accepted a position with FedEx in Colorado Springs, where she met and married Gene Farrar in 1990. Johanna and Gene lived and worked in the Colorado Springs area, moving to Monument in 1992 when their oldest daughter, Hannah, was born. In 1995, after their second daughter, Rachel, was born, Johanna retired from a successful career as a Technical Advisor at FedEx for an even more successful and rewarding career as a dedicated full-time mother.

Johanna introduced her daughters to Girl Scouts at the first opportunity and became a local leader in Monument, then again after relocating to Buena Vista. When Johanna first arrived in Buena Vista, she learned Girl Scouts had all but disappeared in Chaffee County. Johanna believed so strongly in the values and skills that Girl Scouts develops, it became a passion to reestablish Girl Scouts for girls in the high Rockies. Known to many of her friends as the “Engergizer Bunny” because of her seemingly never-ending energy and indomitable spirit, Johanna provided the leadership and drive to rejuvenate Girl Scouts in the valley. Now, for the first time, there are troops for all ages.  Additionally, Johanna loved the outdoors, including skiing, hiking, biking, mountain climbing, and especially gardening – passions she loved to share and instill in young women.

 

 

Silver Award Girl Scouts work to ban disposable plastic bags

Girl Scout Cadettes Ella M., Amanda B., Mia J., and Giana A. of Troop 62458 from the Columbine area in Littleton waited for more than FIVE HOURS on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 to talk once again with Jefferson County Commissioners about why they should ban the use of disposable plastic bags. The girls are working to earn the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette and the second highest honor in Girl Scouting. Even though Commissioners told the Girl Scouts they will not implement the ban, these Girl Scouts aren’t giving up. They now plan to talk with business owners and the public to encourage everyone to stop using disposable plastic bags.

The Cadettes first brought their idea to Commissioners on July 31 and made the following statement:

In Colorado, we see plastic bags littering our rivers and highways, and in trees all over our parks. The plastic bags degrade into our rivers, lakes, and reservoirs polluting our water, therefore damaging our ecosystem.

In addition, disposable plastic bags make our groceries more expensive. Stores pay anywhere from $1 to $6,000 per month on disposable bags. The stores then add that cost into groceries and products. The average hidden cost of bags that consumers pay is $37.50 every year. Consumers use 100 billion plastic bags per year. More than 90% end up in landfills where they are not exposed to elements that would degrade them. We cannot let this go on any longer. Plastic bags continually block drainage systems and put poisons into the water supply. Many animals mistakenly eat plastic bags and as more animals eat each other, the pollutants go up the food chain, and eventually end up on our dinner tables. It’s time we take control of the environmental impact of our actions by getting rid of disposable plastic grocery bags.

Commissioners wanted to recognize the girls’ hard work and dedication, so they presented them with a special coin on behalf of Jefferson County.

The girls talked with Dan Daru of Fox31/KDVR-TV after the second meeting with Commissioners: https://bit.ly/2Pa3Jtv

On Tuesday, July 31, the girls were interviewed by Ashley Michels of Fox31/KDVR-TV: https://bit.ly/2OAvfAo

G.I.R.L.s paint inspirational messages on bathroom stalls for students

Submitted by Adrienne Prince

Metro Denver

Parker

Update: On Wednesday, August 15, 2018, the troop was interviewed by Karen Morfitt of CBS Denver. Watch the story: https://cbsloc.al/2BhY16d 

Girl Scout Cadette Troop 4664 from Parker wanted to send encouraging messages to students at Mammoth Heights Elementary School in Parker, their former elementary school. They painted bathroom stalls with encouraging and inspirational messages, such as “You are brave,” “Good vibes only,” ‘”Dream, strive, become,” “Drive with purpose,” “Be kind,” and “You are enough.” In all, six Girl Scouts painted 42 stalls in a girls’ and boys’ restrooms in May and June of 2018.

This was all part of their project to earn the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette. The girls wanted to do this because they have all experienced bullying and not being included. They wanted to share something encouraging and positive with younger students. The girls are proud to have earned their Silver Award because it allowed them to give back to their school and be role models. They want to show their community that teenagers and girls can be leaders!

Congratulations Lois P., Sophia S., Caitlyn S., Madison G., Eliza A., and Rachel T.!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scout delivers 60 care packages to pediatric diabetes patients

Silver Award Girl Scout Makayla of Arvada delivered 60 care packages to pediatric diabetes patients at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes on the CU Anshutz campus on Wednesday, July 25, 2018. The packages were part of her project to earn her Silver Award, but more importantly,  they were in honor of her aunt who died from complications with diabetes and was a patient at the Barbara Davis Center. Each bag is filled with items that newly diagnosed children will need, such as alcohol swabs, but Makalya didn’t stop there. She also included some fun things, like coloring books and crayons.

Jeff Todd, a reporter with CBS4 Denver, was there when Makayla delivered the bags. Click here to watch his story.

To learn more about Makayla and her project, read this blog: http://gscoblog.org/2018/05/one-g-i-r-l-attempting-to-tackle-t1d-costs/

 

Gold Award Girl Scout Zoi Johns named VFW Colorado Scout of the Year

Gold Award Girl Scout Zoi Johns of Golden was honored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars as the Colorado Scout of the Year in June 2018. VFW recognizes the impact scouting has on not only the nation but the world. Zoi told Girl Scouts of Colorado, “Thank you for being a part of my story and my success. THIS is why we do what we do.”

Learn more about Zoi’s Gold Award project on GSCO blog: http://gscoblog.org/2017/10/girl-scout-gold-award-project-zoi-johns-golden-project-waterwise/

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Silverthorne

Nearly 100 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Silverthorne Pavilion in Silverthorne on May 11, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 25 in the Mountain Communities region earned the Bronze Award. 10 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and three became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at highest awards celebration in Colorado Springs

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Penrose House at El Pomar in Colorado Springs on May 4, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 191 in the Pikes Peak region earned the Bronze Award. 105 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and six became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Megan Burnett served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“All the skills you learn in Girl Scouts, through the meetings you plan and the badges you earn, are all intended to prepare you for the future,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Silver Award project: Free Little Library

For their Silver Award project, Girl Scouts from Troop 14013 Megan T. and Hailey T. in Grand Junction designed, built, and installed a Free Little Library at Lincoln Park. The girls love reading and wanted to share that love with their community. The library was immediately used by children and adults.

Mandy Beilman was at the girls’ event because she has been visiting Free Little Libraries around the country. GSCO asked her a few questions about her personal connection to Free Little Libraries.

When did you get started doing this?

I remember seeing Little Free Libraries in online articles, but never seeing one in person. I saw my first one in the summer of 2016 in Homer, Alaska. My family was there for a deep sea fishing trip and I spotted one with a mermaid on it. I swapped out the book I had brought along for the trip with a new read. After that, I started noticing them more places and being intentional about seeking them out.

Where have you experienced these?

In many places! I’ve visited several in Anchorage, AK, as well as the one in Homer. The farthest east I’ve gone is Topeka, KS. I plan to continue seeking them out whenever I got to a new place. My daughter and I like to take photos of them and I have an album on Facebook. My favorite ones so far are the ones that I find by accident. There’s a bit of magic in finding one and seeing what books it holds!

What is your interest in LFL?

I’m a high school English teacher, so literacy is important to me. I love the idea of giving out free books, it’s a great community service! Plus, I think the libraries are cute; I enjoy seeing all of the different styles. I can’t wait to put one in my front yard.  (As soon as I sign the closing papers on my first home).

What made you come to this one?

I saw the girls putting it together and thought I’d come over and visit! I’ve never been the first patron before, my daughter and I really enjoyed that.  The one the girls designed is beautiful, and it has a perfect location, right next to a park.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Denver

More than 1,000 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center in Denver on April 29, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and more than 400 in the Denver Metro region earned the Bronze Award. Nearly 200 girls across the Denver Metro region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 23 girls across the region earned the Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2017 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the 2017 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I learned how to be responsible for what I said and did. I found something I believed in and learned how to speak up for my beliefs. The Gold Award also taught me how to not only work with a team, but lead a team,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Troop 60474 earns highest awards

Submitted by Cherie Piccone

Metro Denver

Littleton

In their quest for their Bronze and Silver Awards, the girls of Troop 60474 identified the need for a summer food bank for kids in their own community. The girls have always participated in community service projects at shelters by preparing and serving food. When planning for their award projects, they felt passionate about helping kids from their own community. They were shocked to learn that children from their own school struggled on weekends with access to food. The girls didn’t realize that without access to school breakfast/lunch programs during the weekend, the last meal low-resource children may have would be lunch on Friday until they returned to school on Monday morning. The girls were concerned about the obstacles these kids would face during the summer and decided to take action. They reached out to several food banks, but discovered limited resources during the summer and decided to create their own summer food bank.

With two Juniors and 11 Cadettes in the same troop, the girls broke off into smaller, more focused groups to make their goal a reality. Each small group addressed different aspects of establishing the food bank. For example, three girls were responsible for procuring sites for the food drives and organizing the sign-ups. Another small group was responsible for proper storage, sorting, and labeling of food. Another group was responsible for creating a well-balanced, weekly selection of foods. (i.e. three fruits, three veggies, three proteins). They also created a spreadsheet that organized what food, which families, and the dates. Another group worked with the procurement of the pick-up site and arranged the sign-up for weekly drop-offs.

They could partner with a local church to arrange for weekly drop-offs. It was important to the girls that the recipients and themselves remained anonymous. Because the church had limited space, the girls had to arrange for weekly drop-offs over the course of the whole summer. Not only were the families happy to have the weekly donations, they discovered that this church could help them longterm. Many of the families found another resource to help them. Because of this, their summer food bank continued to help these families even when school resumed.

As the leader for Troop 60476, it was difficult to take on the Bronze and Silver Awards with such a large and mixed level troop. I am confident that the work these young ladies completed made an impact in our community where needs are not always easily identified. I am amazed and proud of their accomplishments.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.