Category Archives: Highest Awards Archive

Silver Award Project: Archery Range in Thornton

Submitted by Brandy Schauppner

Metro Denver

Thornton

Samantha, Abby, Eden, and Aleaha from Troop 62511 partnered with the City of Thornton to complete construction on an archery range that is ADA accessible and available for everyone to use. They designed and completed construction on 12 target stands and six bow hangers to support the range.

When the girls decided that this was a project they cared about, they reached out to their local city council members, who connected them to the city parks and recreation department. They secured all of the materials needed through a local lumber company (Alpine Lumber) and got to work.

The girls planned their design with the intention of promoting the sport of archery for its mental focus and physical benefits. They also wanted to complete a project that was accessible to everyone. The girl’s designs allowed for easy reach of the equipment and the city worked with the girls to provide grounds to achieve this.

The archery range is free to use and is located at 5990 E 100th Ave, Thornton, CO 80229 at the Spratt Lake Finishing Facility.

The girls are working to plan and lead a day camp next summer. This will be a great facility to allow them to offer experiences with the sport!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Silver Award Project: Stress Relief Kits for Kids

Submitted by Heidi Kane

Metro Denver

Thornton

Alanna from Troop 62816 completed her Silver Award project, Stress Relief Kits for Kids. She put together kits to help relieve stress during COVID. She made videos on how each activity worked and teamed up with the Adams 12 school district  to distribute her kits during free lunch distribution hours during the summer! She also worked with a few local troops, teaching younger Girl Scouts how to do the activities that help relieve stress.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Silver Award Project: Little Angels

 

Submitted by Heidi Kane

Metro Denver

Thornton

Jaedyn and Emma from Troop 62816 completed their Silver Award project, Little Angels! The girls created an annual clean-up day in their community for a local cemetery in Brighton. They learned how to properly restore a grave from the cemetery manager to help maintain the headstone placement. They got a boulder donated and engraving donated to mark with “Little Angels” for the baby section of the cemetery. The girls paid for with their troop money a new sign in English and Spanish for the cemetery. The cemetery also allowed the girls to help complete and organize their veteran list, so they can properly place flags and wreaths for years to come. The girls inspired the cemetery to plant a new tree and install a bench for loved ones to come and visit their little angel that has passed.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Silver Award Project: Binx Blankets

Submitted by Heidi Kane

Metro Denver

Thornton

Rayannin from Troop 62816 completed her Silver Award project, binx blankets! She received fabric donations and learned how to sew. She created kitten blankets for adopted kittens. The blankets went to Blue Sky Animal Hospital, which gives medical care for kittens through the Colorado Kitty Coalition!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Silver Award Project: Little Library in Thornton

Submitted by Heidi Kane

Metro Denver

Thornton

Kaitlin and Skylar from Troop 62816 completed their Silver Award project by working with Good Shepherd Methodist Church in Thornton to place a little library near their garden section. The girls’ work included landscaping, cement work, assembly of the structure, painting, and collecting books!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Little Library and Bench Added to Berthoud

Submitted by Lori Major

Northern & Northeastern CO

Berthoud

After a long process, Lorelai and Alexis of Troop 74087 were finally able to finish their Silver Award project! They added another Little Library, including a bench, to the Berthoud community. When asked why this project, their answer was, “We care about the kids in the community and want them to have books available to read that were easy to access when the library wasn’t open.”

The process started with a class offered by GE Johnson in Colorado Springs. The girls built a bench and cabinet with the help of the company employees. GE Johnson drew three troop numbers to determine who got the benches. Their troop was selected to take the bench home and install it in the community. The challenge of finding the perfect location took the longest. These girls learned about the construction of the library and bench, as well as how to work as a team. They also learned great communication skills through the process. This project was long and hard but worth the success in the end.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Silver Award Project: Activity Boards for Alzheimer’s Patients

Submitted by Heather Browning

Metro Denver

Denver

Current conditions have provided both opportunities and roadblocks for our girls to reach out and help their communities. Despite difficult times, Alexis was able to collect enough donations to create 11 activity boards for Alzheimer’s patients at Juniper Village located in Aurora, Colorado. The boards were made for people suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease and other memory disorders for the purpose of helping keep their minds active. The boards included items such as light switches, fabrics, beads, loops for stringing, and more.

By completing this project, Alexis earned the Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Silver Award Project: Connect with Snow Leopards

Submitted by Nadya D.

Superior

Northern & Northeastern CO

Hello! I am Nadya, Colorado Girl Scout from Troop 68214, Aspen Gold Service Unit. I am an eighth grader at Eldorado P-K8, and I have completed my Silver Award Project, “Connect with Snow Leopards,” to help spread awareness on a global issue – the conservation of wild Snow Leopards.

Through this project, I have discovered my passion for creating content that young girls will enjoy, while also gaining important real-world knowledge. In the process of completing “Connect with Snow Leopards,” I got to make connections with amazing people both within Girl Scouts and the Snow Leopard Trust organization, and it was truly humbling. My project offers a solution to a problem that matters on multiple levels. Not only does it give Girl Scouts stuck at home a fun patch to do, it also educates them on an important and not well-known issue, while at the same time shining a light on organizations like the Snow Leopard Trust and Conservancy.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

In the face of the global coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Girl Scouts continue to do all they can to make our world a better place by taking action to address issues facing their local communities. There are no better examples of this Girl Scout spirit and resiliency than the 16 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who recently earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting. They include:

  • Sidney Barbier from Steamboat Springs, Steamboat Mountain School, tackled the issues of waste and recycling, particularly at Colorado state parks. She designed signage for state parks, hosted events to educate others about waste diversion, and even created a Junior Ranger curriculum.
  • Charlotte Blish from Arvada, Arvada West High School, started a nonprofit, Watering Communities, to teach elementary-aged students about how the lack of clean water impacts socio-economic and education resources in parts of Africa.
  • Clare Bolon from Longmont, Apex Homeschool Enrichment Program, developed and taught a week-long online course about how to write and read cursive. She also created resources to help students continue to practice their cursive after completing the course.
  • Kayla Fairweather from Parker, Ponderosa High School, developed a video curriculum on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) to supplement the T1D training that teachers currently receive. It features the perspectives of diabetic students, parents, a professional athlete with T1D, an endocrinologist, and a diabetes resource nurse.
  • Zoe Johnson from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, created a handbook and video about horse care and safety to educate new or inexperienced horse owners, as well as barn staff at summer camps.
  • Beatrice Lin from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, developed a workshop and handbook for Girl Scout Daisies and Brownies called “Bringing Global to Girls” (BGtG). The goal is to help younger Girl Scouts develop a sense of connection to the rest of the world and appreciation for other cultures.
  • Ellie McWhirter from Denver, East High School, developed a series of educational materials, including a website, to decrease plastic bag usage in her community and increase the knowledge of plastic bag pollution.
  • Isabella Mendoza from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a cheap and sustainable habitat for solitary bees to lay eggs in and distributed more than 350 habitats around Colorado and the world. She also hosted a community event for people to make their own habitat.
  • With the help of local Girl Scout troops, Ashlyn Morrill from Parker, Chaparral High School, created a pollinator garden that attracts various pollinators, including hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, etc. Girls learned the importance of pollinators and were inspired to do their part to help conserve the pollinator populations.
  • Opal Mosbarger from Peyton, Falcon High School, addressed the issue of animal displacement during emergency situations. She collected kennels and blankets for Perfect Fit Wellness Center, so people can keep their pets safe during natural disasters and other emergencies.
  • Wren Murzyn from Fort Collins, Poudre High School, partnered with doctors, nutritionists, and others to create a guidebook to assist individuals who are wanting to get healthy, but don’t know where to start.
  • Meredith Neid from Denver, George Washington High School, started a self-care club at her high school to healthily address rising levels of stress amongst her peers. After the start of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, she adapted her project to include Zoom conversations with high school seniors about processing the pandemic and what it means to grow up during this time.
  • Anna Rahn from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created 17 STEM activities for schools and after-school programs. Due to the pandemic, she was unable to distribute them to local schools, so she developed a website where PDFs of the activities are available.

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the mark of the truly remarkable— earned only by a high school Girl Scout who works to address an issue she’s passionate about in a way that produces meaningful and lasting change. Whether it’s on a local, national, or global level, Gold Award Girl Scouts provide innovative solutions to significant challenges. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls are entitled to enlist at a higher pay grade if they join the military.

“Gold Award Girl Scouts don’t just change the world for the better, they change it for good—and these Girl Scouts embody everything this achievement stands for,” said Leanna Clark, Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “Each of these young women addressed an issue that’s important to her in order to earn her Gold Award, and we congratulate each of these Gold Award Girl Scouts on this momentous accomplishment.”

You can learn more about these Gold Award Girl Scouts and their projects on the Girl Scouts of Colorado blog.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Wren Murzyn, Fort Collins, “Guidebook to Healthy Eating and Living”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a guidebook to assist individuals who are wanting to get healthy, but don’t know where to start. More than 70 percent of the United States is considered overweight and many who are don’t understand why and don’t know how to start to change their lifestyle.  My family was part of this statistic – growing up we didn’t have money or time to focus on healthy eating and setting healthy goals.  In creating this guidebook, I wanted to provide a resource that offered information on creating uncomplicated healthy habits that could easily be incorporated into a busy lifestyle or one that is on a budget.  My goal was to provide a resource to encourage a focus on overall health and well-being, making sure individuals gained healthy habits, and not just focused on losing weight.  The guidebook is divided into six sections and includes the latest information available to start the journey and also includes a lot of recipes and tips.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I wanted to make sure my guidebook was available to a variety of people, so I set it up as a PDF and as a website. I sent flyers and business cards to doctors, nutritionists, hospitals, food banks, and even my school district and school board and asked that they pass them out to their patients, clients, and students.  I also promoted it on social media.  I requested feedback and suggestions and enabled web analytics to track how many people were looking at and using the information.  I made sure that the information presented was clear, concise, easy to use, and was from trusted sources and had been reviewed by nutritionists so that anyone using the information would find benefit.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

By making sure the guidebook was broadly available I was able to receive feedback from multiple contacts. The fact that my guidebook is on the web and on social media will help sustain it and encourage it’s use.  I am also updating the content based on the feedback I’m receiving and, as part of my International Baccalaureate work in high school, I’m continuing to add information to provide even more context around the issue like the correlation between early education and a healthy lifestyle.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

As part of my efforts to promote the guidebook, I contacted the agencies whose information I had used for parts of my project. Several got back to me and, based on web analytics I can see that others, like the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland reviewed my work.

What did you learn about yourself?

Starting my Gold Award prior to the pandemic and ending it during the virus crisis taught me to be flexible, resourceful, open-minded, and how to truly be a leader. I had to revise my plans multiple times in order to change with the conditions we were all facing.  Many of the ideas I had needed to be revised after I was well into the project and my leadership skills were tested by having to ask for resources and assistance virtually.  My team was made up of health and nutrition specialists at doctor’s offices and schools who had their own issues with the virus. So, I had to make sure that my project didn’t impact the work that they were doing, with this in mind I kept moving forward which really allowed me to develop as a leader and helped me feel comfortable asking for help and directing people older than me.  I’m very proud of my finished product and am looking forward to continued feedback from people who use it.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The Gold Award allowed me to grow in project management, leadership, and creative problem solving, as well as letting me gain in depth knowledge on a subject that was impactful to my family and my community. I feel that being able to refine these skills while I’m in high school will help me in college and my career where I’ll often be asked to do research, lead groups, and make sure I’m heard in professional groups.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

I have been a Girl Scout since I was a Daisy in Kindergarten. I’ve earned my Bronze and Silver Awards and have been looking forward to doing a large, impactful project where I was the leader.  Girl Scouts has prepared me for the Gold Award by allowing me to plan, lead, and budget for meetings, badge requirements, service projects, and even parts of trips we took as a troop.  The Gold Award was a way for me to take all my Girl Scout experiences and use them to develop something that will continue to benefit the community.  I am very glad I chose to complete it and am proud when I tell people that I have earned the award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

The Gold Award definitely developed my leadership skills – working with, directing, and managing a group of professional adults which was challenging and rewarding and allowed me to realize that I am very capable of managing a team. Earning the Gold Award also helped me be a go-getter – from developing a concept to dealing with a pandemic and having to redo and revise the project as a result – I was constantly working to make sure my project was able to move forward and that I could finish it.  As a risk-taker, I tackled a subject that I had a very personal connection to but I didn’t have a lot of knowledge about.  I knew I wanted to make something that would be helping people get healthier and I took a risk that I would be able to create something that would inspire and motivate my audience.  Finally, I also got to be an innovator by sampling recipes, working with nutritionists to revise them, and thinking up tips and tricks to help people with little free time to eat healthy and take a chance on trying and experimenting with home cooking.  I feel the Gold Award definitely helped me become a well-rounded G.I.R.L.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.