Category Archives: Gold Award Honorees

Gold Award Recipients

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Catherine Welch, Highlands Ranch, “ iTech for Seniors”

 

Catherine Welch

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project addressed senior citizens and their connection to technology. Because most of the older generations aren’t as familiar with technology as my generation is, my goal was to increase their knowledge about different electronics in our world today.  I set up multiple open-house technology sessions at Holly Creek Retirement Community. Along with the help of my volunteers, we were able to help over 33 residents with their technology questions.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I created surveys for residents in the Skylark Adult Day Care to complete at the end of every session. This helped me get feedback from the residents. It was a way to help me improve my sessions to ensure all their questions were getting answered.  I also was able to learn what different technology they were having difficulties with and they ranged from cordless phones to iPads.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

After I completed my sessions at Holly Creek, I spoke with several members of my community, sent emails to multiple church youth groups, presented my project to the Centennial Star Service Unit leaders, and posted in the Facebook page for the service unit. Through these efforts, I was able to come in contact with Junior Girl Scout Troop 62599 to carry on my project with Holly Creek. I am so excited that others in my community will be able to see what a rewarding experience this can be. I have also left manuals at Holly Creek so the residents can refer to them on a daily basis.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Technology is present everywhere in our world today and the need for assistance with it is not only present in my community, but it is also present in other communities across the nation, and across the globe. One resident that my team and I helped was able to connect with his grandson on the east coast whom he hadn’t seen in many years. By giving the residents access to this technology, and knowing how to use it, they can be better connected to our society.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about myself while doing this project. I had to figure a lot of things out on my own and sometimes I would get to the end of the rope and think it was the end, but I continued to motivate myself and get the job done. I also used leadership skills like being open-minded to other’s opinions and ideas. When things wouldn’t go how I expected them to, I had to be open to ways around the obstacle. I worked on communication as I worked with a variety of different people and their styles of dealing with others.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project gave me the experience and tools to be able to take on group projects with multiple people. It gave me confidence to take on long-term projects and follow through to the end. It proved my communication skills because of my interactions with older adults, presentations and speaking with people I haven’t worked with before. Using these skills will allow me to be an effective leader and to accomplish my goals despite setbacks I might face.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning my Gold Award was a way to finish out my Girl Scout career. I have been in Girl Scouts since I was 5 and throughout my 13 years I have been able to complete many things, including my Bronze and Silver Awards, so earning the Gold Award was a way to complete the missing pieces to my puzzle in Girl Scouting.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Allison Caperton, Littleton, “Adaptive Gymnastics”

Allison Caperton

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I coordinated a special needs gymnastics camp at JetKids Gymnastics. I hoped to make an impact in the lives of families and children with a variety of special needs. I wanted to give these kids a chance to be involved in such an incredible sport.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by watching the kids grow throughout the weeks, and making sure each kid was gaining something.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The model I created (a four-week adaptive gymnastics camp for children of all ages with special needs) is currently being sustained at JetKids Gymnastics in Littleton, Colorado. An early-summer session was held, and the gym is making plans for more.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

JetKids Gymnastics has a working relationship with many other gyms across the country. By presenting my project to these other gyms and offering my advice and services to help them launch their programs, I am linking the success of my project to a national and global community.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I am smart, strong, able to organize and direct others, sensitive to the needs of my community, able to adapt to challenges, and perfectly capable of making the world a better place. I am proud to represent the Girl Scouts of Colorado with my enduring, global project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I am proud of the lasting legacy I will leave in my community when I go off to college. I feel like I have served not only children with special needs and their families, but also the sport of gymnastics, which has meant so much to me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

If I had not camped with my Daisy troop (when we were just in kindergarten), I might not have learned the strength and tenacity it takes to survive challenges. If I had not found the courage to sell cookies to strangers, I might not have learned confidence. If I had not organized and put into action several Rendezvous weekends for younger girls, I might not have learned the organizational and leadership skills it took to create and implement my project.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Olivia Noakes, Thornton, “Thornton High School Connections with Elementary Schools: Opportunities in Music”

Olivia Noakes

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I developed a multi-media presentation about opportunities in middle and high school music geared towards 4th and 5th grade students. My video and oral presentation provided information about what types of music classes are available in middle school, high school, and outside of school. In addition to this, I explained the many benefits of being involved in music. I contacted 12 schools and visited five; I presented in front of 20 classes, meaning my message reached more than 300 students. These presentations will become an annual occurrence with the purpose of informing elementary school students about their future choices.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

At the beginning and end of each presentation, I surveyed the elementary students about their interest in middle school music. In every single class, less than three students raised their hands before I presented. After I finished, the opposite was true. Also, all of the teachers said they would love to host the visit every year. I discussed my project and the students’ reactions with each teacher, and they were just as excited as I was about my cause.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

After visiting the elementary schools, I created a “Standard Operating Procedure” (SOP) to keep at Thornton High School. The SOP is a manual that includes what my original project was, why I chose it, and step-by-step instructions on how to replicate the visits. Since my supervisor, Mr. Sebastian Adams, is the Instrumental Music Director at Thornton High School, the project will expand to include both orchestra and band (more details are included in the SOP). Secondly, there are several studies discussing the importance of music training and its long term benefits; music education changes an individual for life. Scientific American’s (2010) board of editors asserted, “Studies have shown that assiduous instrument training from an early age can help the brain to process sounds better, making it easier to stay focused when absorbing other subjects, from literature to tensor calculus.”

This is one of many examples of research supporting my message. Lastly, I have made the connection between Thornton High School and local elementary schools, thus opening a line of continued communication between students, teachers, and parents.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My entire project is based upon a concept that is universal: the love of music. Two people who do not speak the same language can still communicate and understand each other through playing music. There are also many international opportunities that students can take advantage of because of music. For example, college students can study music abroad or travel to another country for marching band. Music is the universal language.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot throughout this process, but there are two main lessons that stood out. I gained experience relating to adults. When communicating with the teachers and administrators at the elementary schools, I had to balance being professional with being personal. Adults need to see that I am trustworthy and passionate at the same time. Secondly, I learned that I am 100% capable of making a difference in the world. I created this project myself, and it was successful.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

As I mentioned before, the lessons I learned throughout the Gold Award process will assist me in both the near and distant future. The experiences of communicating personally and professionally will aid me in college, job interviews, and the workplace. Also, I have gained confidence through this project that will propel me through life.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scouts experience?

The Gold Award was the perfect way to sum up everything I have experienced in Girl Scouts. I have developed commitment (I have been in Girl Scouts since Daises), confidence, courage, professionalism, and compassion. I feel that I am a girl of quality because of the experience Girl Scouts has provided me.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

BRONZE, SILVER AND GOLD CELEBRATED AT COLORADO SPRINGS HIGHEST AWARDS CEREMONY

 

*Click here to see more photos from the Highest Awards celebration in Colorado Springs.

More than two hundred Girl Scout families and friends gathered in Colorado Springs on May 15, 2015 to honor Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver or Gold Award.

14 girls were presented with the Gold Award, the highest award a Girl Scout in grades 9-12 can earn. Girls who have earned this award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. Several Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4-5 can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented with their awards.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

Foote also presented the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship to Kelsey Quick. Kelsey, from Salida, Colo., is the first-ever recipient of this scholarship, which was started in 2015. The Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship fund provides annual $500 cash prizes to any and all Gold Award recipients from Chaffee County, Colo. To earn her Gold Award, Kelsey created a website and other materials to help children who have been cyberbullied. She is also the first Girl Scout from Salida to earn the Gold Award since at least 2000. You can read more about her project here.

Other Gold Award honorees also described their projects and how working toward Gold impacted their lives.

Alexandria Bellas from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, organized a science event for girls in grades 6-8 that brought together exhibitors from across Colorado.

Kit Bernal from Falcon, Falcon High School, created supplementary art education and a curriculum for a local homeschool association.

Kayla Bernstein from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, planted a garden for all the residents of the Medallion Retirement Community.

Jonnae Byas from Colorado Springs, William J. Palmer High School, refurbished the garden at the Medallion Retirement Community.

Rebecca Clark from Colorado Springs, Rampart Range High School, organized a clinic to teach the basics of color guard to middle school students.

Mackenzie Crawley from Colorado Springs, Doherty High School, leveraged her love of learning and reading, and her experience volunteering at her local library to bring a sustainable tutoring service and a mini lending library to her church.

Madison Daniel from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, captured and preserved the stories of what’s become known as the “Greatest Generation.”

Madison Haneke from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, made more than 100 blankets for babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at three local hospitals.

Jessica Hild from Colorado Springs rebuilt benches at Camp Alexander. She also organized volunteers to help build five new benches.

Mikayla Jewell from Colorado Springs, Vista Ridge High School, helped make a softball field safer not only for her team, but other athletes as well. She also taught younger athletes how to stay safe on the field.

Madison Keith from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, created a sustainable food pantry for pets.

Lyndsay Ruane from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, wanted members of her community to be better prepared when disasters strike, so she organized an emergency preparedness fair.

Lesleigh Stabo from Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, created a program to help students transferring to a new high school feel more comfortable and get information they need.

We are immensely proud of these inspiring young leaders in our community.

 

Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship awarded to Kelsey Quick

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to announce Kelsey Quick is the first-ever recipient of the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship. Kelsey from Salida, Colo., Salida High School, officially accepted her award on Friday, May 15, 2015 during the Girl Scouts of Colorado Highest Awards Celebration in Colorado Springs.

Started in 2015, the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship fund provides annual $500 cash prizes to any and all Gold Award recipients from Chaffee County, Colo. To earn her Gold Award, Kelsey created a website and other materials to help children who have been cyberbullied. She is also the first Girl Scout from Salida to earn the Gold Award since at least 2000. You can read more about her project here.

Johanna Farrar’s husband and children started this scholarship to celebrate all of her accomplishments, particularly those within the Girl Scout community. Born in London, England, raised in a small village on the south coast of England, Johanna was a Girl Guide in her childhood. She was also the youngest ever to have achieved the Queen’s Guide Award at that time, the English equivalent of a Gold Award.  After earning a software engineering degree from Loughborough University, Johanna moved to New Jersey to work for Bell Labs. In 1985, she accepted a position with FedEx in Colorado Springs, where she met and married Gene Farrar in 1990. Johanna and Gene lived and worked in the Colorado Springs area, moving to Monument in 1992 when their oldest daughter, Hannah was born. In 1995, after their second daughter, Rachel’s birth, Johanna retired from a successful career as a Technical Advisor at FedEx for an even more successful and rewarding career as a dedicated full-time mother.

Johanna introduced her daughters to Girl Scouts at the first opportunity and became a local leader in Monument, then again after relocating to Buena Vista.  When Johanna first arrived in Buena Vista, she learned Girl Scouts had all but disappeared in Chaffee County. Johanna believed so strongly in the values and skills that scouting develops, it became a passion to reestablish scouting for girls in the high Rockies. Known to many of her friends as the “Engergizer Bunny” because of her seemingly never-ending energy and indomitable spirit, Johanna provided the leadership and drive to rejuvenate scouting in the valley. Now, for the first time, there are troops for all ages.  Additionally, Johanna loved the outdoors, including skiing, hiking, biking, mountain climbing, and especially gardening – passions she loved to share and instill in young women.

BRONZE, SILVER AND GOLD CELEBRATED AT GRAND JUNCTION HIGHEST AWARDS CEREMONY

 

(More photos https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/sets/72157651923733237/)

More than fifty Girl Scout families and friends gathered at the Roper Ballroom in Grand Junction on Friday, May 1, 2015 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver or Gold Award.

Mikayla TerLouw was presented with the Gold Award, the highest award a Girl Scout in grades 9-12 can earn. Girls who have earned this award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. To earn the Gold Award, Mikayla TerLouw, who is from Grand Junction and a student at Palisade High School, worked to encourage family literacy and increase the number of parents who participate in reading-related activities with their children.

Mikayla was also recognized for being awarded Honorable Mention for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Earlier this year, Foote, CEO of Girl Scouts of Colorado, made a gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment that will fund an annual $1,000 prize for the young woman who makes the greatest sustainable impact through her Gold Award project.

Several Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4-5 can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented with their awards.

The evening’s featured speaker was Rose Pugliese, County Commissioner for Mesa County, Colo. She shared with girls in the crowd how she always kept perusing her dreams and never let anyone tell her that she couldn’t do something.

We are immensely proud of these inspiring young leaders in our community.

 

BRONZE, SILVER AND GOLD CELEBRATED AT DENVER METRO-AREA HIGHEST AWARDS CEREMONY

*Click here to see more photos from the Denver metro-area’s Highest Awards celebration

More than three hundred Girl Scout families and friends gathered in Arvada on April 28, 2015 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver or Gold Award.

Sixteen girls were presented with the Gold Award, the highest award a Girl Scout in grades 9-12 can earn. Girls who have earned this award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. Several Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4-5 can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented with their awards.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

Foote also introduced Christina Bear of Golden as the first-ever winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Earlier this year, Foote made a gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment that will fund an annual $1,000 prize for the young woman who makes the greatest sustainable impact through her Gold Award project. To earn her Gold Award, Christina organized a week-long summer program for Latino students at the Horizons Summer Program at Colorado Academy. Through informal learning in computer and robot programming and mini-science experiments, students were engaged and excited about technology.

Foote also recognized four Girl Scouts whom the prize committee selected as Honorable Mentions. Emma Coffey from Thornton, Mountain Range High School, designed a video series, shown during the school’s weekly video announcements, to get kids thinking about topics like budgeting and savings. Colorado Springs Girl Scout Madeline McWhorter created a cookbook for Tri-Lakes Cares Food Bank, using ingredients that are primarily donated to food banks. Mikayla TerLouw from Grand Junction, Palisade High School, worked to encourage family literacy and increase the number of parents who participate in reading-related activities with their children. Kelly Winn from Sedalia, Castle View High School, built a miniature library at the Sedalia Museum and Gardens for community members and visitors to exchange books, articles and magazines.

Other Gold Award honorees also described their projects and how working toward Gold impacted their lives.

Jordan Arnell from Centennial, ThunderRidge High School, organized, supplied, and decorated a library for children at St. Elizabeth’s School in Denver, a low resource private school.

Grace Atchison-Reynolds from Parker, Valor Christian High School, used the healing power of music to lift the spirits of residents at local assisted living facilities. She arranged for weekly concerts, calling upon her own personal network of musicians.

Isabella Colosimo from Golden, Ralston Valley High School, assembled kits for children who, because they have Cystic Fibrosis, have to spend a lot of time in the hospital.

Nicole Cheng is proud of her Taiwanese heritage, especially the food! Her grandmother “Ahma” shared her cherished family recipes, and Nicole found her passion in capturing these treasures and sharing them among her local community and online.

Bree Denbow from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, used an old suitcase to start a book exchange at a local park.

Catherine R. Donohue from Broomfield, Broomfield High School, built a chicken coop to help people better understand chickens and their needs. She also helped improve the quality of life for these animals, an outcome that was evidenced when her chickens moved in and immediately started laying eggs.

By providing a simple and beautiful gift to young girls in need in Haiti, Heidi Hufford made a big impact on many who live in poverty. Heidi organized 62 people to sew 575 pillowcase dresses and collected 663 pairs of underwear for girls living in tent cities in Haiti.

Megan King from Centennial, Grandview High School, organized a recycling program at Jackson Lake State Park. Her efforts resulted in the collection of 1,800 pounds of materials in the first year.

Ariel Powers from Littleton, Mountain Range High School, was inspired by a very personal tragedy to create a club called BIONIC, which met regularly to discuss the whys of bullying and how to stop it.

Dana Ruby from Lone Tree, Highlands Ranch High School, organized and ran a large clothing event at Warren Village, a transitional housing organization in Denver. At this event, the child residents could use tickets to “buy” clothing while in a store atmosphere.

Lydia Waterman from Littleton, Heritage High School, made kits to help patients at Littleton Adventist Hospital feel more at home.

We are immensely proud of these inspiring young leaders in our community.

 

Bronze, Silver and Gold Celebrated at Highest Awards  Ceremonies in Loveland & Boulder  

 

 

(More photos https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/sets/72157649832744844/)

More than two hundred Girl Scout families and friends gathered in Loveland on April 24 and Boulder on April 26 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver or Gold Award.

Four girls were presented with the Gold Award, the highest award a Girl Scout in grades 9-12 can earn. Girls who have earned this award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. Several Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4-5 can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented with their awards.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

Mattie McGarey, Sarah Santilli, Vani Topkar, and Devon Wilson spent a few minutes describing their Gold Award projects and how working toward Gold impacted their lives.

Mattie, from Louisville, started a blog to help young girls (especially dancers like herself) recovering from eating disorders.

Sarah, from Erie, was inspired by her volunteer work at a local hospital to organize a blood drive, which saved 72 lives, and put together a list of potential future donors for Bonfils Blood Center.

Vani, from Lafayette, taught people about Bharatanatyam, an Indian form of classical dance.

Devon, from Fort Collins, increase the interest and comfort level of budding musicians in grades 5 through 6 with band and orchestra instruments.  She partnered with her community to increase the support music teachers receive through a high school volunteer program for the summer band camp, and a new informative brochure to be distributed at band events

The ceremony in Boulder culminated with a bridging ceremony for all of the Girl Scouts present who were “bridging” or progressing to the next level of Girl Scouting.

We are immensely proud of these inspiring young leaders in our community.

 

Christina Bear awarded inaugural $1,000 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize

* Click here for more photos of Day at the Capitol festivities.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to announce that Christina Bear, 2015 Gold Award recipient, is the first-ever winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Christina from Golden officially accepted her award on Monday, April 13, 2015, which was also Day at the Capitol for Girl Scouts of Colorado. Lawmakers in the House of Representatives broke from traditional business to honor the 50 Girl Scouts from across the state who are receiving the Gold Award, the highest award in Girl Scouts, this spring.

Christina earned her Gold Award for organizing a week-long summer program for Latino students at the Horizons Summer Program at Colorado Academy. Through informal learning in computer and robot programming and mini-science experiments, students were engaged and excited about technology. Christina was selected as the winner of this $1,000 cash prize by an independent panel. The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote. Of Christina’s project, prize committee members said, “We are delighted at the quality of Gold Award projects we reviewed this year and we are thrilled to award the inaugural Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize to Christina Bear whose project exemplifies community impact through leadership.”

Christina receives this honor along with four other Gold Award recipients, whom prize committee members determined were deserving of Honorable Mention. They are: Emma Coffey, Madeline McWhorter, Mikayla TerLouw and Kelly Winn. Emma Coffey from Thornton designed a video series, shown during the school’s weekly video announcements, to get kids thinking about topics like budgeting and savings. Colorado Springs Girl Scout Madeline McWhorter created a cookbook for Tri-Lakes Cares Food Bank, using ingredients that are primarily donated to food banks. In Grand Junction, Mikayla TerLouw encouraged family literacy and increased the number of parents who participate in reading-related activities with their children. Kelly Winn from Sedalia built a miniature library at the Sedalia Museum and Gardens for community members and visitors to exchange books, articles and magazines. “These projects are exceptional examples of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to recognize all Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

The Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between grades 9 through 12 who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. The Gold Award has been part of the Girl Scout program since 1916. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Foote. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership is making the world a better place.”

The following Colorado Girl Scouts are among the 50 statewide who will be receiving the prestigious Gold Award for the 2014-15 Girl Scout year:

  • Elizabeth Acker from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, built a six station “Fitness Course” around the perimeter of her high school. She wanted to create an energizing space where anyone could go and exercise for free.
  • Jordan Arnell from Centennial, ThunderRidge High School, organized, supplied, and decorated a library for children at St. Elizabeth’s School in Denver, a low resource private school.
  • Nina Asher from Greenwood Village, Cherry Creek High School, took children from the Boys and Girls Club in Denver on a hike near Boulder, Colo. They learned about weather, forest fires, animals, habitat and safety.
  • Grace Atchison-Reynolds from Parker, Valor Christian High School, used the healing power of music to lift the spirits of residents at local assisted living facilities. She arranged for weekly concerts, calling upon her own personal network of musicians.
  • Linda Baker from Fort Collins, Rocky Mountain High School, encouraged girls to get excited about STEM subjects. She created Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and Twitter pages for the Colorado FIRST Lego League website.
  • Christina Bear from Golden, Colorado Academy, hosted a week-long summer camp to increase interest in STEM, especially among Hispanic students.
  • Alexandria Bellas from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, organized a science event for girls in grades 6-8 that brought together exhibitors from across Colorado.
  • Kit Bernal from Falcon, Falcon High School, created supplementary art education and a curriculum for a local homeschool association.
  • Kayla Bernstein from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, planted a garden for all the residents of the Medallion Retirement Community.
  • Kirsten Brandes from Parker, Chaparral High School, designed the curriculum for a series of workshops that fostered self-worth and self-esteem in teenage girls. She presented the workshops to groups around the state.
  • Jonnae Byas from Colorado Springs, William J. Palmer High School, refurbished the garden at the Medallion Retirement Community.
  • Rebecca Clark from Colorado Springs, Rampart Range High School, organized a clinic to teach the basics of color guard to middle school students.
  • Emma Coffey from Thornton, Mountain Range High School, designed a video series, shown during the school’s weekly video announcements, to get kids thinking about topics like budgeting and savings.
  • Isabella Colosimo from Golden, Ralston Valley High School, assembled kits for children who, because they have Cystic Fibrosis, have to spend a lot of time in the hospital.
  • Mackenzie Crawley from Colorado Springs, Doherty High School, leveraged her love of learning and reading, and her experience volunteering at her local library to bring a sustainable tutoring service and a mini lending library to her church.
  • Madison Daniel from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, captured and preserved the stories of what’s become known as the “Greatest Generation.”
  • Chiara Degenhardt from Ouray, Ouray High School, channeled her love for science and the outdoors into a project to benefit Ridgway State Park.
  • Bree Denbow from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, used an old suitcase to start a book exchange at a local park.
  • Catherine R. Donohue from Broomfield, Broomfield High School, built a chicken coop to help people better understand chickens and their needs. She also helped improve the quality of life for these animals, an outcome that was evidenced when her chickens moved in and immediately started laying eggs.
  • Nelly Grantham from Thornton, Horizon High School, created a sustainable program for supplying personal hygiene items to homeless families and those in crisis.
  • Madison Haneke from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, made more than 100 blankets for babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at three local hospitals.
  • Jessica Hild from Colorado Springs rebuilt benches at Camp Alexander. She also organized volunteers to help build five new benches.
  • Rachel Jeffries from Lone Tree, Valor Christian High School, carried out a food drive with an inspirational twist. After collecting food, she enlisted the help of volunteers to add stickers with a positive quote or saying to each item.
  • Mikayla Jewell from Colorado Springs, Vista Ridge High School, helped make a softball field safer not only for her team, but other athletes as well. She also taught younger athletes how to stay safe on the field.
  • Madison Keith from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, created a sustainable food pantry for pets.
  • Katherine Ketcham from Gunnison, Gunnison High School, hosted a STEM Day at an elementary school. Students learned about biology, chemistry, and physics.
  • Megan King from Centennial, Grandview High School, organized a recycling program at Jackson Lake State Park. Her efforts resulted in the collection of 1,800 pounds of materials in the first year.
  • Sarah Kriner from Peyton, Falcon High School, matched her passion for reading with her love of nature. She designed a bird center at her local library. Her project draws birds, which adds to the appeal for children to go to the library.
  • Mattie McGarey from Louisville, Fairview High School, started a blog to help young girls (especially dancers like herself) recovering from eating disorders.
  • Madeline McWhorter from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created a cookbook for Tri-Lakes Cares Food Bank, using ingredients that are primarily donated to food banks.
  • Elise Melhado from Colorado Springs, Cheyenne Mountain High School, created a reading-friendly environment in the Partners in Housing Colorado House. She redesigned a room to better suit the space for a children’s reading space, in addition to initiating a regular reading days with the children.
  • Ariel Powers from Littleton, Mountain Range High School, was inspired by a very personal tragedy to create a club called BIONIC, which met regularly to discuss the whys of bullying and how to stop it.
  • Kelsey Quick from Salida, Salida High School, is the first Girl Scout from Salida to earn the Gold Award since at least 2000. For her project, she created a website and other materials to help children who have been cyberbullied.
  • Lyndsay Ruane from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, wanted members of her community to be better prepared when disasters strike, so she organized an emergency preparedness fair.
  • Dana Ruby from Lone Tree, Highlands Ranch High School, organized and ran a large clothing event at Warren Village, a transitional housing organization in Denver. At this event, the child residents could use tickets to “buy” clothing while in a store atmosphere.
  • Sarah Santilli from Erie, Erie High School, was inspired by her volunteer work ata local hospital to organize a blood drive, which saved 72 lives, and put together a list of potential future donors for Bonfils Blood Center.
  • Lauren Schneider from Fort Collins, Fossil Ridge High School, designed the Medbug, a small, stuffed creature perfect for snuggling. She directed teams of volunteers, who helped create and distribute 450 Medbugs to pediatric patients at local hospitals.
  • Rachel Schneider from Fort Collins, Fossil Ridge High School, provided area hospitals with 600 soft and comfortable pillowcases to make patients feel a little more at home.
  • Lesleigh Stabo from Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, created a program to help students transferring to a new high school feel more comfortable and get information they need.
  • Brianna Talbot from Larkspur, Castle View High School, helped teach children in her community about poverty.
  • Mikayla TerLouw from Grand Junction, Palisade High School, worked to encourage family literacy and increase the number of parents who participate in reading-related activities with their children.
  • Vani Topkar from Lafayette, Fairview High School, taught people about Bharatanatyam, an Indian form of classical dance.
  • Madeline Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, built a vertical garden for the Douglas County Outdoor Education Facility.
  • Lydia Waterman from Littleton, Heritage High School, made kits to help patients at Littleton Adventist Hospital feel more at home.
  • Kelly Winn from Sedalia, Castle View High School, built a miniature library at the Sedalia Museum and Gardens for community members and visitors to exchange books, articles and magazine.

 

 

 

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Grace Atchison-Reynolds, Parker, “Happiness Through Music”

Grace Atchison-Reynolds

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project I organized concerts through Valor Christian High School, as well as Turnbull Piano Studios to be preformed at assisted living facilities.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I pursued this Girl Scout Gold Award because I believe in the healing attributes of music, as well as music’s ability to bring happiness.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My Gold Award project brought happiness to those who were in the assisted living facilities, as well as brought healing.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I gained many skills including coordination, leadership, organization, and communication.

How did you make your project sustainable?

My project is sustainable because it was through many different facilities, and is being continued through the community service organization at Valor Christian.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

My connection is through the national community because of my interest in helping people through music.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will most remember the impact that the music had on the residents and the amount of joy they received.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

My Gold Award has helped develop my skills that I will be able to use the rest of my life.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I believe the Gold Award let me have my own impact on society as well as broaden my scope to all of the needs in society.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org