Category Archives: Gold Award Honorees

Gold Award Recipients

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Jonnae Byas, Colorado Springs, “Refurbishing the Garden”

Jonnae Byas picture

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I refurbished the garden at the Medallion Retirement Center for the staff, residents, and Ms. Elsa Bailey, also a resident and founder of the garden.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I pursued this Gold Award project because I felt that the outcome would have a positive impact on a large amount of people.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My Gold Award project made a difference in multiple ways. One way my project made a difference was through the residents, resident families, and the staff. The residents were so appreciative towards the hard work we put into the garden. Every time my team and I went back to complete further tasks, we witnessed the growth in residents, residents’ families, and staff outside enjoying the garden. Another way my project made a difference was through the appearance of the garden. The appearance of the garden is significant because the garden can help with advertisement of the retirement center in brochures, online advertisement, and personal experience .

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

Through earning this Gold Award, I gained multiple skills. I gained skills such as leadership skills, taking action and making things happen skills, and just skills to help me be more open to connecting with my community.

How did you make your project sustainable?

In order to keep my project sustainable, I made a list of instructions on “How to Keep the Garden Clean” that the staff and maintenance can follow.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

We have personally taken pictures and we shared those pictures on Facebook and other social media to promote the idea socially. Also, we requested for them to be included in the updated brochure for the Medallion Retirement Center.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The amount of hard, long, hot summer days we spent completing this project.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

I believe my leadership skills will develop in a positive way. I now know how to discover, connect, take action, and actually make things happen. I also believe this project provided great amounts of experience that I may need later on in life. I believe that because I had to go to the next level to overcome each obstacle, I ended up learning a lot about improvising, and working with what you are given to work with.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel the Gold Award is one of the most important tasks of a Girl Scout experience for multiple reasons. One reason is because this task is a huge responsibility. Girl Scouts is mainly about teaching responsibility, courage, respect, and many other attributes to build a girl’s character. This project required all of those skills and more. Another reason is because the amount of change that my project made. Another lesson we learn as Girl Scouts is to make a change in order to make the world a better place. I definitely feel that this project made a huge change.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Sarah Santilli, Erie, “GOT BLOOD?”

Sarah Santilli pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I decided to address the need for blood and blood products by starting up ongoing blood drives at a local hospital that was currently not able to sustain a successful drive.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I pursued this project because I have always been interested in the medical field. Currently, I volunteer weekly at North Suburban Medical Center, where they do not currently host blood drives yet there is a great need for blood products to save lives.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My Gold Award made a difference by setting up a donor base for the hospital to continue regular blood drives. There is now a direct link between Bonfils Blood Center and the hospital staff. With the donations received from the first drive, we were able to save 72 lives! It made a difference for Bonfils, the hospital, and the lives saved through our drive.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

The skills I gained during the Gold Award process include taking on leadership, creating a team, and restoring confidence in myself. Through the process of contacting businesses by phone, email, and having face-to-face meetings with team members, I learned that I have the ability to lead a group and have the confidence to do it. I also gained the skill of time management and learning to set goals for myself.

How did you make your project sustainable?

My project will be sustained beyond my involvement indefinitely by creating contacts between the hospital and Bonfils to get back in touch and continue to organize blood drives. After the first drive, we now have a donor base system set up that allows us to contact potential donors.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

Not only are these blood drives helping the community and the hospital, but if more blood donations take place locally, that will decrease the need to obtain products from other areas. If Bonfils and other associations such as the Red Cross have an abundance of blood products, then they can better assist other areas both nationally and internationally when there is need.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will always remember the day of the first blood drive when people were donating and I got to converse with many of them about the lives they were saving. The donors being excited about having future blood drives inspired me to continue this project even after receiving the Gold Award. The next blood drive is already scheduled and I am excited at the thought that this will help save more lives. Although I won’t meet those who receive the blood, I am thrilled that I have helped make a difference in their lives.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Earning my Gold Award has taught me that when I identify a problem or issue, I have the confidence and skills to create a solution. This will help me with future challenges I will face in school and in my career.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

This award is an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I was able to make a huge difference. Over all my years as a Girl Scout, from Kindergarten through 11th grade, I now realize that I have developed important skills through earning badges and my Bronze and Silver Awards. I was able to fine tune them and apply them towards a greater cause. The Gold Award helped me to appreciate everything that Girl Scouts has provided me from confidence, to character, to courage.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Makayla Jewell, Colorado Springs, “Strike Out Injuries”

Makayla Jewell pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I built a dug out for a school’s sports team, in need of a new home, and held a clinic to teach kids about how to stay safe and healthy during physical activities.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I wanted to pursue the project because I felt that my school’s softball field was not safe enough for visiting teams and my team to play on. Also, I feel that it is important for younger kids to learn how to take care of themselves and why its important.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My project made a difference by allowing softball teams to feel safer as they play on our field, and educating kids on their health.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

Leadership skills, communication, organizational, financial, and time management.

How did you make your project sustainable?

I built a structure that will stand for years to come and provide protection for athletes that preform on that field.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

I was unable to make these connections to my national and global community. However, I was able to make a connection through my city and state.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The most memorable part of my project will be that I am able to see my project for years to come. Also, how much fun I had working with a team on a hands on project.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

My Gold Award will help my future by helping me see what kind of engineering fields are out there and helping me further my decision on what path I will take.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that my Gold Award is an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I was able to use all of the laws that I have learned and grow up with since the starting my my Girl scouting experience.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Jessica Hild, Colorado Springs, “Camp Alexander Chapel Restoration”

Jessica Hild pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I gathered a team of volunteers to refurbish the existing benches at the Camp Alexander Chapel. We also built five new benches and applied a weather resistant coating to all of the benches.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I chose this project because my family and I have been very involved with the Pikes Peak Boy Scout Council and Camp Alexander. Through Venturing, I worked and volunteered at Camp Alexander for three summers and had some incredible experiences. This project was something I could be passionate about pursuing.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My Gold Award project has the potential to reach the hundreds of kids that visit Camp Alexander each summer. It is used for weekly chapel services, award ceremonies, and other meetings. The once broken benches are now usable, and the addition of more benches will allow more people to use the space.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

Throughout the planning process of the Gold Award, I gained leadership, planning, time management, and budgeting skills.

How did you make your project sustainable?

I documented every step in planning my project and created a presentation with the information. The presentation gave an overview of my own project, but also demonstrated how the process and skills needed could be applied to the planning of other service projects. I then shared this presentation with the Pikes Peak Boy Scout council, the Girl Scouts of Colorado, the YMCA of the Rockies, and Camp Elam.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

The Scouts that use the chapel at Camp Alexander are not only from Colorado, but come from around the nation and globe. Oklahoma, Texas, and Kansas troops come to the camp regularly, but there have also been staff and scouts from China, Poland, Indonesia, Tunisia, El Salvador, and Pakistan.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The support I received from my family, friends, co-workers, and community surpassed anything I had expected. This support gave me the motivation to succeed.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Because of my Gold Award project, I have more experience with planning and leadership. These are skills that will be important in any career I pursue.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I was able to use all of the skills I learned in Girl Scouts and other places through the years and apply them to a project that would benefit others.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Catharine R. Donohue, Broomfield, “Hens for Friends”

Catharine R. Donohue pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Background: Acres of Opportunity Ranch (AOR) is a not-for-profit organization which partners with horses that have been rescued or retired to educate the community about horses through outreach and onsite opportunities. Their emphasis is on horse education and life skills rather than riding. This effort helps minimize the number of horses that are “thrown away” due to lack of understanding and financial means to take care of a horse. In addition, AOR has a hippotherapy program. In hippotherapy, movements of the horses are used to provide motor and sensory input to people with physical or mental challenges.

Global Issue: There is a need to educate people on animal ownership (care, cost, and responsibility) so that animals are less likely to be “thrown away” because an owner didn’t know what all was involved with owning an animal.

Local Issue: The ranch has other barnyard animals including chickens that were occupying a horse stall that was needed for the program horses. This horse stall-chicken coop was not predator proof, so the chickens occasionally went missing.

  • Solution: Design and build a proper chicken coop with a secure chicken run, and then relocate the chickens. The horse stall will also need to be cleaned and readied for a horse.
  • Additional Benefits: The chickens will also be used to educate and stimulate clients of all kinds and ages, including clients with physical or mental challenges. Interestingly, many people are afraid of chickens, and some people don’t truly understand where an egg comes from. Seeing chickens and being able to interact with them will help with this understanding.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I pursued this project because I am passionate about animals and making sure they are properly treated. A major reason animals are abandoned is because people don’t know how to properly care for them or how much it really costs.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My Gold Award project will impact and educate people of all ages for many years. My target audience includes kids and teens of Acres of Opportunity Ranch. They will learn the basics of how to care for and treat horses and chickens so that in the future, if they get a pet, it will not be “thrown away” because they don’t know how to properly care for them or how much it really costs.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I gained practical life skills. I learned how to properly speak on the phone, connect with people via email, make meeting dates, and speak publicly. I developed critical thinking. I had to find ways to work in tight situations, using the environment and people around me. I grew as a leader when I promoted cooperation and team building. I had many volunteers throughout my project, and some of them did not know each other. I had team meetings every time I met with volunteers to go over names and safety. I advocated for myself and others, locally and globally – when looking for donations and volunteers, I had to explain who I was, what my project was, and where my project was being built. By doing this, I advocated myself, Girl Scouts, Hens for Friends, and Acres of Opportunity Ranch.

How did you make your project sustainable?

The chickens have become a permanent part of the AOR education program. AOR will continue to feed and care for the chickens. An immediate impact my project had was that the chickens were able to move out of the horse stall, and that a horse was immediately able to move into that vacant horse stall. A long-term impact of my project will be that the chickens will have a proper and safe chicken coop to stay. Eggs will also be gathered from the hens and sold to buy chicken feed and other chicken necessities.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

The chickens will be used to educate and stimulate clients of all kinds and ages, having physical or mental challenges or not. Many people are afraid of chickens, and some people don’t truly understand where an egg comes from. Seeing chickens and being able to interact with them will help people’s understanding. People need to be properly educated on animal ownership so that animals are less likely to be “thrown away” because the owner didn’t know the responsibilities of owning an animal.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

How well the coop turned out in the end. The chickens were so happy with their new coop that they started to lay eggs the day they moved in, which is very uncommon.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Having completed my Gold Award, I have learned some important skills that will help me in the future. I will not be afraid to complete big challenges and I will be able to lead in large groups. I learned time management and organizational skills that will help me be a good leader. These skills will help me in college and in future careers.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been a Girl Scout for 11 years and it has been an amazing experience. I earned the Bronze and Silver Awards, and it was always a goal to earn my Gold Award – the top honor of Girl Scouts. Earning the Gold Award was a huge milestone in my scouting career.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Jordan Arnell, Centennial, “St. Elizabeth’s Library”

Jordan Arnell pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I organized, supplied and decorated a library for a low income private school called St. Elizabeth’s School, Denver. I also organized an annual book swap to give the students a chance to take home books for the summer.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I am a very avid reader and I’ve found that has a direct impact on what I understand in the world around me and what I am able to learn in school. I believe that all kids should have opportunities to read in a kid-friendly, encouraging environment and to have access to both library books and books of their own.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My Gold Award project gave approximately 100 students in low income families and neighborhoods a place to read, a library to check out books from and gave them books to own.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I learned communication and planning from my work with volunteers and administrators at the school. I also learned how to work with adults from my work on the actual library and how to work with my peers from organizing the book swap. Additionally, I learned how to manage time and resources and how to get things done.

How did you make your project sustainable?

The book swap I organized is in conjunction with the school’s Spring Festival, which is an annual event. In addition, I talked to one of the school’s after school clubs about continuing the swap and gave them instructions on how to do it. The organization of the library and the library itself will be part of the school for years to come.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

The Spring Festival that the school hosts is a community event, in addition to a school event, which is why I combined my book swap with that event. There were kids from around the community that brought books and swapped for books to take home. I also gave the students’ parents information on reading at home and summer reading and how it helps children be successful in school in the future.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will remember all of the wonderful kids I met. There were some really great kids that were in the library and at the festival. They even wrote me a whole bunch of thank you notes!

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

My Gold Award will help me to know that I have the ability to do anything I want in the future. I will be able to apply all the skills I learned to other tasks to make sure I can get them done.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is really the culmination of all the skills you take away from Girl Scouts. Leadership, communication, organization and the many other skills you learn from badges and other activities really come into play when you try to put together this scale of a project. It’s crucial to see all of this come together because it gives you such a different perspective on what Girl Scouts is all about and really helps you become a better, stronger person.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Madeline Walden, Larkspur, “Growing Up”

Madeline Walden pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I built a vertical garden for the Douglas County Outdoor Education Facility.

 

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I was concerned that students, particularly those from urban/suburban areas, were never exposed to gardening with a purpose, and therefore believed that plants were only to “look pretty” and could only exist in traditional gardens. But in a world that is increasingly unable to grow enough food to support the growing population, it’s important to know that food can come from any number of unique settings. I addressed this issue by creating a setting in which food can be grown unconventionally.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My project filled the need for an engaging and thought-provoking agricultural lesson for elementary aged children in my school district. I hoped to impact the new outdoor education center in my school district, and consequently the hundreds of students who stay there every year, by building a vertical garden that could show the children that gardening is possible even in the most unusual locations. Now, the students will benefit from a lesson in constructive and destructive processes that ends in the realization that even when nature cannot provide the water, soil, sun, etc. that is necessary to successful agriculture, people can use creative problem solving to plant a garden.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

The most valuable skill I developed during this project was self-assertion. Before I started my Gold Award, I was hesitant to ask adults for favors, but as my work progressed, I realized that I needed A LOT of help, and the only way to get it was to ask for it. After dealing with several week long delays, I learned to send follow up emails and be persistant in my questions, and not to just give up and struggle (and ultimately fail) to solve my problems. This project has really helped me learn to interact with adults in a respectful and effective manner.

How did you make your project sustainable?

The garden itself was designed to keep itself alive for years to come; the majority of the plants are perennials or will reseed themselves, the irrigation is fully automated, and the pockets are made from industrial strength (and 100% recycled) materials that will remain sturdy for years to come. More importantly, the lesson plan that was written to accompany the garden can be used to teach 5th and 6th graders for as long as the center wants to use the curriculum.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

My project was originally inspired by the global food crisis, and the vertical garden is an important living lesson, teaching the youth in my community that creative problem solving and ingenuity are important tools in solving this and other world issues.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The paperwork. 😉 And the little bursts of pride that followed overcoming the many obstacles I encountered.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

I hope that earning my Gold Award will prove to others and myself that I am empowered and self motivated, and enthused to take on ambitious projects.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

After twelve years of camping, canoeing, first aid training, and frolicking in the woods with my fellow Girl Scouts, completing my Gold Award was a valuable assessment of what I had learned over the years.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Dana Ruby, Lone Tree, “Once Again, New Again- Clothing for Children in Need”

Dana Ruby pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I organized and ran a large clothing event at Warren Village, a transitional housing organization in Denver. At this event, the child residents could use tickets to “buy” clothing while in a store atmosphere.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I have always had a interest in clothing. I love the feeling of confidence I receive when I put on an outfit I feel comfortable in, and I wanted to provide that opportunity to others that might have a harder time accessing it.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

It impacted the child residents through providing them with clothing, but it also gave the feeling of accomplishment to the parents, when they were able to provide their children with a sometimes overlooked need.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

While earning my Gold Award, I completely grew in my leadership skills. I learned a lot about how to organize and lead a large project, and I developed my time management skills through learning how to juggle my other senior year activities with the Gold Award.

How did you make your project sustainable?

In order to make my project more sustainable, I educated my church community and local troop leaders about my project, the issue I focused on, and Warren Village. I also created a guide that described how to complete my event in detail. I distributed this guide to local troop leaders, Warren Village, and several National Honor Societies in my school district.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

Homelessness was the global and national link to my project. Although most of the residents at Warren Village weren’t homeless before, the amount of income the parents make annually is similar to those who are.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will most remember my clothing event at Warren Village. It was such a large event, and it truly looked- and felt- like it was a clothing store. The event itself affected so many of the residents, and for that I cannot help but be proud of it.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Earning my Gold Award gave me invaluable experience in being involved and leading a large project. This experience has prepared me so much for what to expect at college and whatever else I’m involved in in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been a Girl Scout since kindergarten, and I have noticed that while earning my Gold Award, I was constantly using the skills that I learned and developed while being a Girl Scout these past 13 years.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Kit Bernal, Falcon, “Art Masterpiece”

Kit Bernal pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I adapted and created supplementary art education and curriculum for a local homeschool association.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I am very passionate about art education and wished to spread resources to make it easier for parents and teachers to make art education a part of their classroom.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My Gold Award makes art education accessible, which improves right brain learning, inquisitiveness, creativity, and empathy.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I gained networking and professional skills.

How did you make your project sustainable?

The homeschool program I worked with uses cyclical curriculum, so by making art lessons related to the curriculum, they could be reused almost indefinitely.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

I’ve put all lessons I’ve written on a website accessible to the public as a resource to schools and homeschoolers.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will most remember the excitement of the teachers on receiving lesson plans and materials.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Not only have I made meaningful network connections, but because I want to go into the art field, I already have a completed project to attest to my dedication and skills.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

It was a fitting end to twelve years of dedication to Girl Scouts.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Elizabeth Acker, Monument, “Project Fitness”

Elizabeth Acker pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I built a six station “Fitness Course” around the perimeter of my high school campus. I raised all the money and I organized all the volunteers.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

Everyone wants to get fit and in shape, many people spend time reading the fat diminisher review but everywhere you can get in shape charges membership dues and fees. I wanted to create a space, a place where anyone could go and exercise for free. Schools are stressful places for the staff and teachers. I wanted to create a path and trail where they could go on planning time and de-stress and get fit at the same time.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

I am most proud that we completed the course. The course looks great and it is a great gift to my community and to my school that I love. I made a difference for the staff and the students and my hometown.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I had to organize volunteers for the project. I learned to write grants and I learned to walk into businesses and ask for donations. I learned that I can direct a large scale project.

How did you make your project sustainable?

The equipment is maintenance free, but the school grounds crews have agreed to maintain the equipment if necessary and the grounds around the equipment. Mr. Christensen, the PRHS counselor, and track coach have also planned to continue the trail and course with future Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts looking for Eagle Scout and Gold Award projects. The future of the “Project Fitness” looks good.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

I involved my community members, businesses and made sure to purchase everything right here in my hometown. The people that helped, the students, the parents and teachers/coaches are all from the community and all believed in me and my project. The course is a huge benefit to our school and our community.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I developed a stronger sense of self. I gained practical life skills.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

I developed healthy relationships. I promoted cooperation and team building. I felt more connected to my community, locally and
globally.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

This Gold Award is the culmination of my scouting experience. I started with my Daisy troop in kindergarten and stayed in my same troop throughout my scouting years. I am proud that I completed my Bronze, Silver and Gold Awards. I am better able to organize my time and talents because of my experiences in Girl Scouts. I am using what I learned during the Gold Award in college and am proud to say that my new leadership skills allowed me to become one of the Manresa Orientation leaders at Xavier University during my sophomore year.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org