Category Archives: Bronze Award Honorees

Bronze Award Recipients in the 2015-16 reporting cycle (March 1, 2015, through March 1, 2016)

Highest Awards deadline

Girls bridging from Girl Scout Juniors to Cadettes or Cadettes to Seniors this summer have until Sept. 30 to submit online notification (http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/for-volunteers/forms-and-resources/bronze-and-silver-notification.html) that they have earned their Bronze or Silver Award.

The Bronze Award is the highest achievement for Girl Scout Juniors and the Silver Award is the highest achievement for Girl Scout Cadettes. Through earning one of these Highest Awards, girls change their corner of the world and maybe even beyond. Through submitting online notification, you can order letters of recognition, certificates, and pins. Girl Scouts of Colorado honors and celebrates girls in a special way at our Highest Awards Celebrations in the spring. See photos from the 2017 celebrations: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/sets/72157679203803063

2017 Highest Awards booklet: Now available online

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Nearly 1,800 Girl Scouts, families, and friends celebrated this year’s 1,400 Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients at five regional celebrations across the state throughout late April and early May. These young women have taken charge to identify issues in their community and develop and implement original plans to create positive change. We couldn’t be more proud of their accomplishments!

Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado, spoke at all five celebrations. These are some of her favorite events of the year because they are the only times she gets to be in the room with so many Highest Awards recipients at once.

Sarah Greichen, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize winner, and National Young Woman of Distinction, was the emcee in Pueblo, Loveland, and Denver and a keynote speaker in Pikes Peak.

Jessica Mills, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, was the emcee in Pikes Peak while Shauna Clemmer, a Gold Award recipient and current member of the Western Slope Gold Award Committee, was the emcee in Grand Junction.

The Highest Awards Celebrations are incredibly special events where girls are recognized among their family and fellow Girl Scouts for their achievements. Additionally, this is a special time for younger girls to see older girls in action and get inspired to go for their Silver and/or Gold Awards.

Check out the electronic version of our 2017 Highest Awards booklet online (http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/dam/girlscoutsofcolorado/documents/GSCO_2017_HA_Booklet.pdf) and view our “Best of Highest Awards 2017” photo album on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/albums/72157679203803063/page1).

Troop 71171 earns Bronze Award

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Submitted by Ericka Pilon

Northern & Northeastern CO

Firestone

We are Troop 71171 in Frederick/Firestone. Our Juniors have been working on their Bronze Award this year. In February, March, and April of 2017, our girls had events at our local senior center, including game and puzzle night, Easter egg coloring, and craft night. For their final event, they had a huge spaghetti dinner and bingo night.  We fed 37 seniors, 13 Girl Scouts, and eight adult volunteers. ?

Our girls cooked and served  dinner (spaghetti, meatballs, salad, and bread), dessert (brownies and ice cream), and drinks (water, coffee, lemonade) all night long.  They led a rousing game of bingo as well. They were complimented left and right on their behavior and manners. They sent each senior home with a gift bag full of goodies donated by our community through a drive that the Girl Scouts led through their elementary schools. We are very proud of the work they have done this year.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients celebrated in Denver

Nearly 1,000 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center on May 7, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Colorado Springs

Nearly 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion in Colorado Springs on May 5, 2017 to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

Jessica Mills, 2016 Gold Award recipient, served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked about her own journey to earn her Highest Awards and encouraged all the girls to continue to make a difference in their communities.

“I encourage you to reflect on the person you were at the beginning of your project, and look at the person you are today. I hope you find that you have grown confident in your ability to make a difference in the world,” she said. “Completing my Gold Award project made me find who I truly was – it defined my character. Gold Awardees, I encourage you to look back on your experiences in Girl Scouts. Your commitment to making the world a better place has instilled courage, confidence, and character within you.”

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen was the celebration’s keynote speaker. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing Highest Awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Bronze and Silver Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Grand Junction

Nearly one hundred Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on April 30, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 35 on the Western Slope and in Southwestern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last year, nine girls on the Western Slope and in Southwestern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

Shauna Clemmer, a Gold Award recipient, and current Gold Award Mentor for the Western Slope, served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked about her own journey in Girl Scouts and wished all the girls the best in their pursuit of the highest achievements in Girl Scouting.

Sandy Jackson, a First Class recipient, current Gold Award Mentor, and Professor of Anthropology, Archaeology, and Sustainable Studies at Colorado Mountain College served as the keynote speaker. She spoke about her experiences in Girl Scouting from earning her First Class (what we now call the Gold Award), recycling and planting trees, to traveling the world and visiting Our Cabaña, one of the WAGGS World Centers in Mexico.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Bronze Award project featured on 9NEWS/KUSA-TV

Congratulations to Girl Scout Troop 4020 in Northern and Northeastern Colorado! These Girl Scout Juniors were recently featured on 9NEWS/KUSA-TV in Denver. They built a Buddy Bench in memory of Odin Mitchem, one of their classmates at Flagstaff Academy in Longmont. According to 9NEWS, “Odin passed away at the beginning of this school year, but his classmates wanted to make sure his goal was not forgotten.”

Watch the story using this link: http://www.9news.com/news/education/buddy-bench-helps-kids-find-playmates/435768495

Interested in sharing your Highest Awards story with the media? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. Your project does NOT have to be completed in order to contact AnneMarie. She will work with you determine the best way to share your story.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Embassy Suites by Hilton in Loveland on April 23, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Before the celebration, Stephanie Foote presented Gold Award recipient and 2017 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni with an engraved silver medallion from The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma, from Arvada and senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, was named one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. This is a nationwide program honoring young people for outstanding acts of volunteerism. As a State Honoree, Emma will receive $1,000, the medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip in early May to Washington, D.C. She will join top honorees from other states and the District of Columbia for four days of national recognition events. During the trip, 10 students will be named America’s top youth volunteers of 2017.

 

Bronze and Silver Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Pueblo

Nearly one hundred Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Center for American Values in Pueblo on April 21, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 24 in Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last two years, 18 girls across Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Troop 31747 earns Silver and Bronze Awards

Girl Scouts in Troop 31747 from La Junta took the lead to make their world a better place and will receive two of Girl Scouts’ highest awards at an upcoming celebration in Pueblo.

Girl Scout Juniors Annie Clarke and Megan Lofing earned the Bronze Award for collecting more than 200 stuffed animals for children being treated at Ark Valley Regional Hospital in La Junta. One of the biggest lessons the girls learned from this project was goal-setting. When they started, their goal was to collect 50 stuffed animals. However, because they worked so hard, they surpassed that goal! The girls also realized that it feels good to do something that helps someone else, especially other children.

Girl Scout Cadettes Bethany Taullie, Alexi Nunez-Rebel, Mariana Marquez, and Kamryn Fisher will accept the Silver Award. They collected donations of personal care products, snacks, and other items and used them to create more than a dozen “Blessing Bags” for homeless members of their community. The girls even wrote personal letters of encouragement to put in each bag. The girls say this project taught them how to set a goal, break it down into steps, and achieve that goal effectively. They also learned about leadership because each girl was responsible for a different part of the project. The girls also shared their project and how they did it with members of the community, so the project can easily be repeated.

The Girl Scouts of Colorado Highest Awards celebration in Pueblo is Friday, April 21, 2017 at 6 p.m. at the Center for American Values  (101 S Main Street #100). To learn more about this event, use this link: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2017/highest_awards_celeb.html