Category Archives: Take Action/Highest Awards

Gold Award Girl Scout:  Avery Hendrick, Castle Rock, “McCabe Meadows StoryWalk Trail”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I constructed a StoryWalk Trail with 16 signs and six rotating stories at a nature trail in my hometown.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project through attendance at my opening event and overall trail attendance at the location. I also distributed posters at local businesses and flyers at local elementary schools.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable through the permanent nature of the signs and the rotation of the signs. I currently change the stories every two months, but after the first year the National Honor Society at Ponderosa High School will take over the rotating of the signs two or three times a year.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project is connected to the national and international StoryWalk program which has trails in all 50 states and 12 countries.

What did you learn about yourself?

Throughout this project, I learned how to be a better communicator in different situations with different types of people. I also learned how to be resilient in situations that required creative solutions.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

In my future, earning my Gold Award will make me a better leader and a better organizer. By doing this project, I have the experience to direct projects in the future that I might not have had the knowledge to direct in the past.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

To me, the Gold Award was the culmination of my Girl Scout experience as a whole. The project wrapped up every skill I have worked on since I was a Daisy, from the badges to the camps to the leadership projects I volunteered with. Without the entirety of Girl Scouts and all that it taught me I would never have been able to reach the levels I have.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me learn how to be an innovator by teaching me how to dissect complex problems and come up with creative solutions that I had not originally thought of. For example, when coming up with a product to use for my signs, I used industrial cooking cutting boards in order to find a product that was both resilient and cheap enough for my budget.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Blakeley Bennett, Colorado Springs, “Collaboration for Coexistence”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a multi- faceted workshop targeted toward middle school and high school aged students. The workshop was designed to first educate students on some of the many human/ environment conflicts that are ongoing in the world and why, and secondly to engage students in small group discussions and empower them to problem solve to determine possible all- party solutions to these conflicts. The project was presented to both the local Cheyenne Mountain Zoo teen program (of which I have long been a part), and the second annual Youth Leadership in Conservation conference (hosted at CMZ), which is a national conference for teens interested in conservation and animals.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The impact on my audience was measured by post session surveys, change in mindsets/ attitudes of participants, and personal feedback forms completed after the workshop session. The post session surveys asked about things such as what participants had learned/ taken away from the workshop, if their thoughts or attitudes about any of these topics had changed, and what series of action steps they could individually take to help make a difference for conservation. Additionally, the personal feedback forms revolved around the actual content, organization, set up, and process of my workshop session. Furthermore, several participants informed me post conference that they had shared ideas from my presentation with their zoo education staff members across the country.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

This project is sustainable because the entire curriculum fits into a reusable kit that can be easily transportable and includes instructions so that anyone who wants to present it would be able to. All content materials are laminated and in the lesson are filled out with whiteboard markers, to use paper sustainably and cut down on the amount being used. Additionally, any participants who asked for my PowerPoint presentation or pictures of curriculum materials were able to take documentation of my project, with the intention of presenting something similar with either their teen programs, or just to speak with their family, friends, and communities about my project and its contents.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project encompasses both a national and global connection. The national connection stems from the conference attendees who attended the zoo’s teen conference (from 7+ states) who took pieces of my project home with them to share with their communities. The global connection stems from the range of topics and research sources I used in which impacts many communities and ecosystems throughout the world. Some of the local zoo staff members I worked with to gain a research base have worked with international conservation efforts and organizations and used insight and knowledge from that to help me fuel my project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned many things about myself, including the development and improvement of many personal skills. I developed confidence when public speaking and I learned how critical it is to maintain an open mind and be able to maturely receive feedback and criticism. I learned that I do possess the kind of committed and driven attitude needed to undertake and successfully complete a large project like the Girl Scout Gold Award. I additionally learned about how serious the importance of time management is, as I learned the hard way a few times while completing this project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This Gold Award project will impact me in the future, because it showed me what aspect of conservation I really am passionate about, and has allowed me to shift what I want to pursue in college in the next couple years. This project is something that I will be able to build upon in my career to help make a difference in the world for conservation and global communities alike. Additionally, Gold Awards are regarded highly in college applications and on job resumes, so having earned my Gold Award may allow me to have more opportunities and advantages in the working world.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Completing and earning the Gold Award was one of the most important parts of my 11 years in Girl Scouts, because it showed me how I can use a team of people who care about me and my efforts, in addition to my passion for leadership to create something truly inspiring. Being a Girl Scout my whole life has helped me to believe that I can make a difference in the world if I set my mind to something, and this experience showed me just how possible this was.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Even though this Gold Award project helped me to become all the traits of being a G.I.R.L., the one that sticks out to me the most is go- getter. Undertaking and completing this project helped me to realize that even though I am only a teenager, I can accomplish great things, and have the power to enact change for something I really care about. It helped me to develop a new sense of unwavering determination for long term projects with delayed results, but I’ve learned how worth it is.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

2020 Highest Awards Celebration DEADLINE

Troop leaders and individual girls have until March 1, 2020 to finish their Highest Awards project AND submit their Bronze and Silver Award Notification Form to be invited to the 2020 Highest Awards Celebrations.

Bronze and Silver Award Notification Form: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/for-volunteers/forms-and-resources/bronze-and-silver-notification.html

In the first week of March, an email invitation will go directly to all troop leaders and parents who submitted a notification form to RSVP for the celebration events.

Questions? Email Kaitie LoDolce, GSCO Highest Awards Manager, at highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Troop 66517 Bronze Award project

Submitted by Brittney T.

Metro Denver

Arvada

On December 23, 2019, we completed our Bronze Award project. We wanted to do something that would benefit our community and our peers. We’ve all had hard days at school, so we chose to paint sayings on the bathroom walls to remind our fellow students that everything is going to be ok! Things like, “Throw Kindness like Confetti” and “Believe you can and you will.”

First, we worked together to come up with our sayings, we wanted them to be inspirational, but easy to remember too. Next, we worked together to build our presentation for the principal. Once we were confident we had a good presentation, we made an appointment to present to the principal.

Once we had an agreement with the school, we rounded up our troop leaders and we went to school over Christmas Break! Our leaders stenciled our sayings on the wall for us, then set us loose with the paint! It was a little scary, because we really only had one chance to get it right with the paint. We worked together and cheered each other on and everything turned out great!

We hope our work will help to inspire students for years to come! Thank you, Campbell Elementary, for letting us come paint on your walls! A special thank you to the janitors for staying with us on their day off, as well!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twenty-seven Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Lakin Altman from Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Christian School, created “Baby Bundles,” a program to provide low-resource families with clothes and necessities for their babies. She also designed a resource guide for new mothers, so they could know where to go if they need help.
  • Kate Bleyle from Highlands Ranch, Kent Denver School, designed a creative writing curriculum for students K-12. It is available for students of any background (e.g. homeschooled, low-income, the average student). Kate also taught her curriculum with Boys and Girls Clubs.
  • Christine Bolt from Steamboat Springs, Steamboat Springs High School, organized an annual summer camp for children with autism. Each day focused on an aspect of camping and outdoor skills, including building a fire, setting up a tent, and wildlife awareness.
  • Bianca Bryant from Woodland Park, Woodland Park High School, worked with city leaders to build the community’s first dog park, which is now maintained by the city and a volunteer group.
  • Devyn Dhieux from Evergreen made dozens of reusable grocery bags out of animal feed bags. She also taught others how to prepare the bags to be sewn and even created a “How-To Manual” with instructions on how to make this type of reusable bag.
  • Emma Downing from Colorado Springs, Rampart High School, remodeled the children’s space for a non-profit that helps women, children, and other victims escaping abuse. Emma also provided inventory boxes for the residents that can be used to store and catalog their personal belongings.
  • Hanna Ellis from Wray, Wray High School, worked with city leaders to increase the number of pet waste dispensers around the town. She also educated others throughout the community about the adverse health effects related to pet waste.
  • Heather Fleming from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, knows first-hand how children of alcoholics can feel lost and alone, so she developed a series of materials to help families affected by alcoholism. These resources are being distributed by the Colorado Mental Wellness Network and at rehabilitation centers here in Colorado and across the country.
  • Renee Gangwish from Boulder, Fairview High School, led a group of volunteers to restore fences at the historic Walker Ranch Homestead in Boulder County. She also created a curriculum to educate others about the importance of Colorado’s open spaces.
  • Emma Gibbs from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, brought together different organizations at her high school to create an ongoing incentive program as part of an effort to increase school spirit and boost attendance at school-sponsored events and activities.
  • Inspired by her own struggle with celiac disease, a serious autoimmune disorder, Emma Graziano from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, started a support group for teens living with celiac disease for the Denver Celiac Support Group, a local chapter of the National Celiac Association (NCA).
  • Joslyn Hays from Gunnison, Gunnison High School, promoted the game of Ringer within the community of Gunnison and with tourists. She also built a kiosk by the Gunnison Marble Rings explaining the game of Ringer and its history in her community.
  • Abby Kennedy from Lakewood, Lakewood High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary school students. Students not only improved their performance, but their interest in continuing their music education was increased as well.
  • Lauren Kettler from Thornton, Horizon High School, developed “Popsicles of Positivity” to teach middle school-aged students about the need for kindness and perspective. The program is designed to be a short activity that can be integrated into other programs, such as a class period or club/group meeting.
  • Samantha Kucera from Steamboat Springs, Steamboat Springs High School, created a wilderness skills program for children. Through this program, she ran numerous educational events for more than 230 children, created an online skills guide, and has a booklet available as a Wilderness Junior Ranger Program at Steamboat Lake State Park and as a patch program with Girl Scouts of Colorado.
  • Audrey Pass from Thornton, Eagle Ridge Academy, partnered with detectives and victims’ advocates to create a video and website with accurate and sensitive information regarding sexual assault.
  • Taylor Sich from Lakewood, Lakewood Senior High School, created “H.O.P.E” (Hold On, Pain Ends) a program for teenagers to help identify and reach out to their peers when they are in need of mental health support . She also established many peer-facilitated groups at school, as well as created a website for parents and children to find resources and read about the stories of others who are going through the same thing as they are.
  • Cassandra Sterns from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, developed and taught ongoing technology classes through her local library for independently living seniors to help them learn how to use their Android smartphone. Each class taught the attendees how to use different apps on smartphones such as messages, camera, email, and Internet.
  • Jessica Sweeney from Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, addressed the issue of deforestation through her ongoing tree planting initiative. She gathered 31 community members to plant 40 trees and shrubs, as well as two flats of sedges at CALF’s Lowell Ranch in Douglas County.
  • After experimenting with container gardeningherself, Kyra TerLouw from Grand Junction, Grand Junction High School, partnered with Community Food Bank to create vegetable container garden kits that are available to members of her community. They included soil, seeds, nutritional information, and a bilingual “how-to” brochure.
  • Amy Tomshack from Northglenn, Northglenn High School, addressed the topic of emergency preparedness in schools. She did this by organizing and running a Hands-Only CPR and Stop the Bleed first-aid class, as well as organizing and running an ongoing supply drive to collect supplies to expand her school’s first-aid kits.
  • Bri Wolle from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, partnered with SCOPE International to share her love of music with children in Kenya. She bought and shipped 60 recorders, 15 to four schools, in addition to recorder books. Nine months later, she visited the schools and learned that her hope to spark a passion for music into the lives of the children half a world away was achieved.

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the mark of the truly remarkable—earned only by a high school Girl Scout who works to address an issue she’s passionate about in a way that produces meaningful and lasting change. Whether it’s on a local, national, or global level, Gold Award Girl Scouts provide innovative solutions to significant challenges. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls are entitled to enlist at a higher pay grade if they join the military.

“Gold Award Girl Scouts don’t just change the world for the better, they change it for good—and these Girl Scouts embody everything this achievement stands for,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “Each of these young women addressed an issue that’s important to her in order to earn her Gold Award, and we congratulate each of these Gold Award Girl Scouts on this momentous accomplishment.”

Gold Award Girl Scout: Renee Gangwish, Boulder, “Fence It Up”

What did you do for your Gold Award Project?

For my Girl Scout Gold Award Project, I completed an historic and environmental restoration project. My project was to restore the fences around Walker Ranch Homestead. It was mainly to bring out a group of volunteers to restore rotted out and broken down fences for the good of the community, as well as increase public awareness on a wide scale of the need for environmental restoration not only for current use, but for future generations.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I increased public awareness on a wide scale by using my curriculum to reach about 150 people at my dance team, 40 at the Parks and Open Space Advisory Committee meeting, and 30 girls and parents from my troop. I hope to increase the visitation percentage to Walker Ranch, but unfortunately I do not have any data to illustrate if this was accomplished as it will take more time for the data to be collected. I was the first Girl Scout to work with Boulder County, and have opened the door for many more to do the same.

How is your project sustainable?

The fencing will be sustained for many years after my project due to the new and stronger material we will be using, but also by others who have the same passion as me and will continue to restore these fences. The sustainability mission of Boulder County and Walker Ranch is to “maintain a high quality of life, without compromising the ability of future residents to do the same.” My curriculum will be sustained because I have a signed letter from the owner of my dance studio, Artistic Fusion, promising to allow me to continue on teaching and sharing my curriculum to inspire kids and their families from across all of Colorado. As well, my website will stay up and continue to be viewed by people, as well as promoted by Boulder County through a flyer of mine which will be put up at their offices to direct people to my website. This will allow my message to continue to be spread through the Internet and all of those who see it.

What is your projects global and/or national connection?

My project was shared in the local newspaper, as well as being aired on CBS4 News in Colorado. My website is able to be seen both globally and nationally. I sent my website to WAGGGS, Piper Jaffray, National Parks and Service’s Office of Public Relations, the State of Colorado Office of Public Relations, International Affairs Department of the University of Colorado, Boulder, as well as to Boulder County Parks and Open Space.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I can interact and manage working with several organizations at the same time, although often challenging. I learned that I can recruit, organize, and lead a team of my friends and fellow students to accomplish a project of this magnitude. I learned that if I am passionate, hard working and persistent, it is possible to achieve great things.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I believe that earning my Gold Award will make me more prepared and confident in my actions in the future. Whether it be in school or in a job, I feel that this experience will be one a keep with me and use it to better myself in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award, though isn’t the complete end of my experience, was a summation of everything I have learned through Girl Scouts, as well as how Girl Scouts has changed my view on the world. The passion and care I have for the environment was curated through Girl Scouts, which is what lead me to create and spend a lot of my time on my Gold Award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me become both a leader and go-getter. I had to coordinate with many different people and companies in order to get everything accomplished for my project, causing me to become a “go-getter” and take action to ensure everything got done. I also became a leader through taking charge of my project and everyone who helped me during the process.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Abby Kennedy, Lakewood, “Band Buddies Music Mentorship”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my project, I created a program where Lakewood High School students go to local elementary schools once a week to work with the elementary school band students on their instruments. In these after school mentoring sessions, the high schoolers work with elementary schoolers who play instruments in the same family (brass, woodwinds, etc.). The aim of this was to help the elementary schoolers improve more rapidly to show them the benefits of music and how rewarding it is to play an instrument, to ultimately increase the likelihood that the would continue with music into middle school and high school. In order to make this project long lasting and to spread it, I created a basic curriculum, as well as a website to both share my project and provide a framework for future students in my school to continue the project.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The main component of my measurability was a survey for the elementary school students asking if they planned on continuing with band into middle school taken at the beginning and end of the tutoring program last year. In the initial survey, only half the kids were sure that they would continue, while by the final survey all of them were sure they would continue, which was a great success. I also made qualitative observations about the student’s general attitude towards the program and music, as well as their skills throughout the year, and they all ended more excited about music and better at their instruments.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

At the level of my school, I am working with students who are currently tutors and underclassmen so that they can take over when I graduate at the end of this year. I am providing my school with instructions on how to run the program, to make sure the core ideals and basic method of running the program don’t get lost over time. My advisor, the band director of the elementary schools in my area, has also stated that he is dedicated to keeping the program running as well. He will be a key component in sustaining the program at my school for years to come, being a constant as kids come into and graduate from high school. On a larger scale, my program will live on through my website and the instructional resource I created to help guide others to start and run programs in their own areas, which I am sharing with other students who are passionate about music.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project is based on a topic that people is applicable to anywhere in the world in addressing music and music education. This is dealt with on all sorts of levels depending on the country and area you consider. Some countries in Europe have subsidized arts programs, while this varies a lot throughout the United States., and then some underdeveloped countries rely on outside organizations to bring in any music education at all. With this, I helped to address music education as it was most applicable to my area. In order to expand my project to a global scale, I reached out to Tri-M Music Honor Society, an organization with more than 6,000 chapters of dedicated music students globally, about publishing a link to my website and curriculum on their website as a potential service project idea. This would apply my project to students all over the globe, and I am eager to keep working on establishing this connection.

What did you learn about yourself?

I am a reserved and shy person, and I have never been super comfortable putting myself out there, public speaking, and working with new people. Going into this project, this made me very unsure of my ability to be a leader and a teacher. Throughout this process, I have found myself facing and conquering these obstacles, showing myself that I am capable of both leading and teaching, as well as overcoming my fears.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

As I go into college next year, the skills I acquired in terms of leadership, communication, and working with new people will be incredibly important. From becoming practiced at reaching out to new people who could potentially help my cause, to figuring out how to lead a team, these are all skills I can use for the rest of my life. I am certain that I would have not gained these skills had I not completed this project, and I am grateful to have these skills to help me succeed in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Having been a Girl Scout since kindergarten, the Gold Award has been a valuable experience in wrapping up my time as an active member of Girl Scouts, as I graduate from high school this year. The project combined many things I had learned through Girl Scouts throughout the years, and with this I think the Gold Award was a remarkable opportunity to enact everything my Girl Scout experience gave me. Overall, the Gold Award has in many ways been the culmination of the Girl Scout career, solidifying and amplifying everything I have learned since I began 13 years ago.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Completing my Gold Award has definitely helped me become more of a go-getter. Having faced many obstacles, tried many solutions, and accepted a few instances of failure with my project, I am much more open to trying new things and tackling a situation head-on. I am less afraid of facing obstacles and can focus on working towards solving an issue, instead of focusing on how an idea could fail even if it has great potential for success. This has made me much more willing to go for something even if I have inhibitions, hence more of a “go-getter.”

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Joslyn Hays, Gunnison, “Marbles Kiosk”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I promoted the game of Ringer within my community and with tourists. I built a kiosk by the Gunnison Marble Rings explaining the game of Ringer and its history in Gunnison. The game of Ringer is a traditional game played with marbles and a 10-foot ring. It focuses on the importance of sportsmanship. I also hosted marbles workshops, placed bags of marbles with in-depth rules at the Jorgensen Park Ice Rink and Gunnison Tourism Office for people to borrow, and helped the City Council write a resolution naming the Gunnison Marble Rings the Jerry Piquette Marble Rings.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I handed out surveys at my workshops. The surveys showed how much people’s  knowledge increased on a scale of five (average increase of 2.4) and whether or not they enjoyed the workshop, found it informative, and would like to play marbles again. The results were all positive and showed that promoting marbles is important.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The kiosk will be maintained by the Gunnison Parks and Recreation Department, so it will continue to stand for tourists and locals to come and learn from. The Gunnison Marbles Club will replenish the bags of marbles and instructions in case they get stolen, and they will host the workshops in early summer. These groups will help to continue promoting marbles around my community and make my project sustainable.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I sent pictures and the concept for the kiosk to the National Marbles Committee’s Facebook page for them to share with the rest of the marbles community. This was the method that they asked me to share my project with them through. We hope that Marble Clubs around the nation will follow my example to promote marbles and its sportsmanship.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am good at public speaking. That is an activity that I don’t enjoy, but was required of me throughout this project. It was good to learn that I can do it without seeming uncomfortable.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The leadership skills I learned while earning my Gold Award will stay with me through the rest of my life. I will be able to lead groups in school and my future career by understanding how to work with lots of different groups and set and enforce deadlines. Knowing that I can lead will also help me be more confident in general. This will allow me to do my best work in all future endeavors.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was the finish line for my Girl Scout experience. I had known that I wanted to earn it since I was a Brownie. Earning my Gold Award was a big part of my overall Girl Scout experience. I was able to focus and pursue my Silver Award and a Journey knowing that they led to the Gold Award. I always tried hard when selling cookies because I knew that some of the money would go towards my Gold Award. More than having been my goal, doing my Gold Award project has been a big part. I’ve been able to see the skills I’ve learned from Girl Scouts come together to help me in this project. I’ve also been able to develop as a leader, which is a great thing to start at a younger age. These have helped me understand the importance of getting my Gold Award and why it tied my Girl Scout experience together,

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Getting my Gold Award helped me become a go-getter. My project was nontraditional and focused on promoting a small, but important activity. Marbles is an inclusive activity that promotes sportsmanship above all else. I hope to have portrayed those values through my time as a Girl Scout. By pursuing this project, I believe that I set a stage that Gold Awards should be different and unique projects specific to your community. I was also one of the few girls on the Western Slope to earn her Gold Award this year. I hope that my achievement encourages other girls to complete their project as well.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Pet adoption connection

Submitted by Chandra Allred

Western Colorado

Glenwood Springs

I have a troop on the Western Slope. My Juniors did their Bronze Award last year contributing to one of the largest pet adoption fairs held in the Glenwood Springs area. Helping pets is a huge passion for my girls.

Last week, my family adopted from a rescue in Denver which rescues from high kill shelters in other states. We picked up our new baby and we were met with a wonderful surprise, a gifted blanket from a Girl Scout troop in Denver.

I just wanted to tell you girls “Thank You!!” Keep up the good work, such a very special gift.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Heather Fleming, Englewood, “There’s Help for You Too”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project is oriented to help children and families of alcoholics. From personal experience, living with alcoholics can become chaotic and unpredictable, making you feel lost and alone. My project was directed at putting information in places where it was easily accessible to families and children of alcoholics who need guidance as to where their next step should be. To do this, I wrote a blog which was published on the Colorado Mental Wellness Network’s (CMWN), which is statewide and connected with other states. I developed brochures which were distributed at multiple rehab centers (local and state-wide), the CMWN, and a local library.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My blog provided the audience with information and resources and the survey helped measure the effectiveness of the blog and its content. Through this experience, I realized that I wanted to help to make resources, support groups, and advice for people in a similar position to mine more readily available. Due to the confidentiality of this subject and anonymity, it was necessary to conduct my project in a different manner.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

For my project, I wrote a blog which is part of the Colorado Mental Wellness Network’s website (published June 2019). I also made brochures that detailed symptoms, and resources that would be helpful to families of alcoholics. These brochures were sent to:

Colorado Mental Wellness Network

  • Statewide
  • Main location is in Denver, CO

Rehab Centers

  • Denver Springs
  • Denver, CO
  • They often send patients from their facility to rehab centers out of state.
  • Parker Valley Hope Rehab Center
    • Parker, CO
  • Bradford Rehab Center
    • Alabama (multiple cities throughout)

AA

  • Have contacted individuals in the Denver area who will personally distribute.

When I sent these organizations my brochures, I had Parker Valley Hope, Bradford Rehab Center, and Denver Springs rehab center agree to continue to reprint brochures after my project is finished.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project addressed the issue of alcoholism globally because the resources and support I provided was online and accessible to a variety of audiences. Additionally, I chose organizations to work with that received an audience from a wide range of locations and who could spread word throughout that network. Organizations such as Denver Springs often send their patients to other rehab centers across the country. I have had brochures distributed there in an effort to spread my resources to locations other than Denver. I also sent brochures to Bradford Rehab Center, which is a well known rehab center in the U.S., located in Alabama. They receive patients from many different locations throughout the country and their families sometimes visit the center as well. This exposure to families outside Colorado provides a global connection and can spread my brochures throughout the country.

What did you learn about yourself?

Throughout this project, I learned how to delegate certain activities to a team of people, as well as having the perseverance to continue working on the project and keep trying when it seemed like things would not work out. I learned that being a leader required me to push myself and talk to as many people as possible to create a network. That is extremely important for success. I often had to continuously contact certain organizations due to their inaccessibility. Since they often didn’t respond, I learned how to update organizations about progress on my project so they were aware of my next steps.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I have gained many skill sets that will help me in my personal life as well as in my professional career. I understand how to communicate with organizations effectively and I have learned valuable leadership skills.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

It was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I had the most personal growth and I learned a lot of skills early on in my life that will be beneficial to me throughout the rest of my life.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L.?

I learned how to delegate tasks to keep my project moving and accomplish my goals. I learned how to motivate myself to get my work done and set goals that I can accomplish but also gave me a challenge. I learned that taking risks is necessary to keep a project moving and accomplish the most that I can.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org