Category Archives: Girl Scouts News

Juliette Girl Scout earns 2015 NCWIT national and local recognitions in computing

 

Christina Bear, a junior at Colorado Academy in Denver, has been selected as a 2015 NCWIT National Award runner up. With her skills of computer programming in Java and Scratch and overall passion for STEM, Christina developed Project STEM Student Mentors for her Girl Scout Gold Award, which she received in January 2015.

For her project, she taught STEM enrichment with Scratch and robot programming and mini-science experiments to minority 3rd grade students attending the Horizons Summer Program in 2014. In October 2014, Christina presented her project in a webinar to the Colorado STEM Network at the invitation of the Colorado Education Initiative. In January 2015, Christina secured a Proclamation from Governor John Hickenlooper declaring January as STEM Mentoring Month.

Her project is unique as she explored the role of high school students serving as STEM mentors for minority elementary students to increase STEM interest and engagement. Christina is pleased to report that her STEM Student Mentor project with Horizons Summer Program will be continued this summer by Upper School students at Colorado Academy, thus sustaining her vision and legacy for minority student enrichment.

On April 13, 2015, Christina received the first-ever Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Award from the Girl Scouts of Colorado for community impact through leadership.

Christina is also a two-time winner of the Colorado Affiliate Aspirations in Computing Award; the ceremony was held in Boulder, CO at the Univeristy of Colorado on April 26, 2015. Christina has been accepted for a summer internship in 2015 at the National Institute for Health in Bethesda, MD to study genomic integrity. She believes that STEM has opened many doors. In order to keep up in the 21st century, Christina encourages her fellow Girl Scouts to gain experience in computing and technology in and outside the classroom.

Christina Bear with featured speaker Ms. Amy Schendel, software engineer at Google, at the Colorado Affiliate Award Celebration on April 26, 2015 at the University of Colorado at Boulder (Photograph by Steve Wille).

Girl Scout Troop 40969 Juniors shoot to Bronze

11200610_10155464474540366_1365832081343647541_n.jpg

Submitted by Rebecca Schmidt

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

Girl Scout Troop 40969 Juniors worked extremely hard this year. The entire group decided to focus on two problems in the community.

The first is that they are seeing our communities getting taken over by trash and litter. They are concerned about animals and environment and decided to do something about it. They have created a program where they are asking everyone to go out one day a month and fill a garbage bag full of trash. Not just at your house, but in your neighborhood or community. To kick this off the girls have selected a day every month to cleanup a different area that has been recommended but a member of the troop. This was an incredible experience because as they were cleaning up the Lorson Ranch Community, they came upon a TV someone had thrown along the road and it took almost the entire group to clean it up a scout said.

The second problem they took on was finding a way to help the senior citizens of our communities. They partnered with the Sunny Vista Senior Center and have started an Adopt-A-Grandparent Program. The Scouts have done amazing so far. They have scheduled a monthly visit with some wonderful ladies and gentlemen. The Scouts cooked cookies, sang and played Bingo and this is only the beginning.

These programs have been pushed to the other groups in the troop and we are continuing to work with Community Partners, other troops and organizations to get the work out and get more involved.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scouts, their moms experience Empowered Family Training

IMPACT%20youngest.JPGIMPACT%20oldest.JPG

Submitted by Cricket Hawkins

Breckenridge

Mountain Communities

The Mountain Communities hosted IMPACT Personal Safety Colorado for a two-day training at Summit County’s South Branch Library in Breckenridge.
IMPACT’s Empowered Family: Child and Caregiver Safety Program is a strength-based, primary prevention, program that focuses on skills and topics appropriate for each participant or group including boundary setting, bully and abuse prevention, self-advocacy, and personal empowerment.

“I found tremendous value in it for my 2 daughters ages 7 and 9, and me. My girls learned how to stand up for themselves to children in bullying situations and how to stand up to an adult if that adult were to do something that made them uncomfortable. Most importantly they learned how to tell a parent about it. These are situations that are sometimes hard to talk to your children about without scaring them. Impact provided training that made my daughters feel strong and confident, not scared and fearful. One of the most important things that was taught to the girls was to trust their instinct if something doesn’t feel right (or if they get “bad butterflies”) and to listen to it. My daughters and I were taught how to fight off an abductor, which was empowering for all of us. This training was a thought provoking (and sometimes emotional) experience and the things that I learned will make me more aware of my surroundings, a better listener, and ultimately, a better parent. I would recommend this for any mother that has children, and any child (boy or girl).”
“This experience was beyond words! I went through every emotion as the team set us up and trained us for situations that we hope will never happen to us. My 7 year old daughter and I learned how to use our verbal language, body language, and finally how to fight back to protect ourselves. I feel that this training has changed my life. I am not afraid to stand up for myself and my family if ever anyone tries to hurt us. Impact Colorado is an amazing group of people!”

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Eagle Brownie Troop 50852 works on Eagle River Watershed Restoration Project

 

Submitted by cricket Hawkins

Eagle

Mountain Communities

For the past six years the Eagle River Watershed Council (ERWC) has been working on a 1.6 mile stretch of the Eagle River to improve the aquatic and riparian habitat. Now in the final phase of their project, ERWC removed protective cages from around Narrowleaf Cottonwood trees on April 11. The girls helped by painting the trunks with a sand paint to deter beaver predation. This project is part of their work on the Wonders of Water Journey.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

BRONZE, SILVER AND GOLD CELEBRATED AT GRAND JUNCTION HIGHEST AWARDS CEREMONY

 

(More photos https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/sets/72157651923733237/)

More than fifty Girl Scout families and friends gathered at the Roper Ballroom in Grand Junction on Friday, May 1, 2015 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver or Gold Award.

Mikayla TerLouw was presented with the Gold Award, the highest award a Girl Scout in grades 9-12 can earn. Girls who have earned this award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. To earn the Gold Award, Mikayla TerLouw, who is from Grand Junction and a student at Palisade High School, worked to encourage family literacy and increase the number of parents who participate in reading-related activities with their children.

Mikayla was also recognized for being awarded Honorable Mention for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Earlier this year, Foote, CEO of Girl Scouts of Colorado, made a gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment that will fund an annual $1,000 prize for the young woman who makes the greatest sustainable impact through her Gold Award project.

Several Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4-5 can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented with their awards.

The evening’s featured speaker was Rose Pugliese, County Commissioner for Mesa County, Colo. She shared with girls in the crowd how she always kept perusing her dreams and never let anyone tell her that she couldn’t do something.

We are immensely proud of these inspiring young leaders in our community.

 

BRONZE, SILVER AND GOLD CELEBRATED AT DENVER METRO-AREA HIGHEST AWARDS CEREMONY

*Click here to see more photos from the Denver metro-area’s Highest Awards celebration

More than three hundred Girl Scout families and friends gathered in Arvada on April 28, 2015 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver or Gold Award.

Sixteen girls were presented with the Gold Award, the highest award a Girl Scout in grades 9-12 can earn. Girls who have earned this award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. Several Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4-5 can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented with their awards.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

Foote also introduced Christina Bear of Golden as the first-ever winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Earlier this year, Foote made a gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment that will fund an annual $1,000 prize for the young woman who makes the greatest sustainable impact through her Gold Award project. To earn her Gold Award, Christina organized a week-long summer program for Latino students at the Horizons Summer Program at Colorado Academy. Through informal learning in computer and robot programming and mini-science experiments, students were engaged and excited about technology.

Foote also recognized four Girl Scouts whom the prize committee selected as Honorable Mentions. Emma Coffey from Thornton, Mountain Range High School, designed a video series, shown during the school’s weekly video announcements, to get kids thinking about topics like budgeting and savings. Colorado Springs Girl Scout Madeline McWhorter created a cookbook for Tri-Lakes Cares Food Bank, using ingredients that are primarily donated to food banks. Mikayla TerLouw from Grand Junction, Palisade High School, worked to encourage family literacy and increase the number of parents who participate in reading-related activities with their children. Kelly Winn from Sedalia, Castle View High School, built a miniature library at the Sedalia Museum and Gardens for community members and visitors to exchange books, articles and magazines.

Other Gold Award honorees also described their projects and how working toward Gold impacted their lives.

Jordan Arnell from Centennial, ThunderRidge High School, organized, supplied, and decorated a library for children at St. Elizabeth’s School in Denver, a low resource private school.

Grace Atchison-Reynolds from Parker, Valor Christian High School, used the healing power of music to lift the spirits of residents at local assisted living facilities. She arranged for weekly concerts, calling upon her own personal network of musicians.

Isabella Colosimo from Golden, Ralston Valley High School, assembled kits for children who, because they have Cystic Fibrosis, have to spend a lot of time in the hospital.

Nicole Cheng is proud of her Taiwanese heritage, especially the food! Her grandmother “Ahma” shared her cherished family recipes, and Nicole found her passion in capturing these treasures and sharing them among her local community and online.

Bree Denbow from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, used an old suitcase to start a book exchange at a local park.

Catherine R. Donohue from Broomfield, Broomfield High School, built a chicken coop to help people better understand chickens and their needs. She also helped improve the quality of life for these animals, an outcome that was evidenced when her chickens moved in and immediately started laying eggs.

By providing a simple and beautiful gift to young girls in need in Haiti, Heidi Hufford made a big impact on many who live in poverty. Heidi organized 62 people to sew 575 pillowcase dresses and collected 663 pairs of underwear for girls living in tent cities in Haiti.

Megan King from Centennial, Grandview High School, organized a recycling program at Jackson Lake State Park. Her efforts resulted in the collection of 1,800 pounds of materials in the first year.

Ariel Powers from Littleton, Mountain Range High School, was inspired by a very personal tragedy to create a club called BIONIC, which met regularly to discuss the whys of bullying and how to stop it.

Dana Ruby from Lone Tree, Highlands Ranch High School, organized and ran a large clothing event at Warren Village, a transitional housing organization in Denver. At this event, the child residents could use tickets to “buy” clothing while in a store atmosphere.

Lydia Waterman from Littleton, Heritage High School, made kits to help patients at Littleton Adventist Hospital feel more at home.

We are immensely proud of these inspiring young leaders in our community.

 

Troop 53724 earns Troop Excellence patch

IMG_4622.jpg

Submitted by Jessica Gentilini

Eagle

Mountain Communities

Troop 53724 has been working really hard to earn their Troop Excellence award as well as their Bronze Award. Some of the projects they have worked on include organizing and running a craft/skit or song table at the S’more Campfire Kickoff that was held in Eagle this year. This event welcomed new girls to come and check out what Girl Scouting is all about and our troop was very excited to tell them their experiences in GS as well as help!

In earning their Global Action badge, they also learned about the need for purifying drinking water and what other kids around the globe face when that is not an option. The girls got to filter “dirty” water with a coffee filter in an attempt to find a solution.

Our troop really grew as leaders this year! Each girl explored her strongest leadership quality and how to develop it further to become an even more effective leader. They then interviewed the Town of Eagle Energy Conservation specialists to learn about what projects the town is working on and how it might inspire them in achieving their Bronze Award this year. More to follow as they complete their Bronze…. Great work girls!!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girls Scouts partner with National Park Service to give Girl Scouts everywhere access to the outdoors

From Girl Scouts of the USA

GGB3

Girl Scouts is excited to announce a partnership with the National Park Service to launch the “Girl Scout Ranger Program,” a joint venture connecting girls with National Park Service sites throughout the United States, including monuments, seashores, and urban sites.

Through the program, girls can participate in a variety of organized educational or outdoor service projects. Additionally, Girl Scouts may design their own project that aligns with their Girl Scout Journey experience, various badge activities, or a Take Action (“highest award”) project. Girls who successfully complete projects will be awarded certificates from the National Park Service and Girl Scout patches.

“Providing girls with access to the outdoors is one of the cornerstones of the Girl Scout mission,” said Anna Maria Chávez, CEO of GSUSA. “Through terrific partnerships and programs like the Girl Scout Ranger Program, we offer girls a chance to engage in outdoor activities that encourage a healthy, active lifestyle and a respect for the environment. We are proud to be teaming up with the National Park Service to help more Girl Scouts in more places experience everything the outdoors has to offer.”

GGB1

 

Girls and troops who wish to participate in the Girl Scout Ranger Program can visit the National Park Service website to locate a park (“Find Your Park”) near their home. There, they can also explore the history of the park and learn about its natural and cultural resources. Troop leaders and parents can arrange for activities like hiking, biking, wildlife watching, and guided interpretive tours, and the Girl Scout Ranger Program will also allow girls to build their own unique park experience, earning badges and patches along the way.

Said GSUSA National Board President Kathy Hopinkah Hannan, “Girl Scouts is very excited to offer girls this incredible opportunity to explore the outdoors. Our national parks are an important part of the American landscape, both physical and cultural, and they have provided generations of American families with unique outdoor experiences. Now, through this partnership, we can offer Girl Scouts everywhere a chance to get outside and learn about nature and the importance of taking care of our environment.”

GGB2

To announce the Girl Scout Ranger Program, May 2, approximately 5,000 girls and 1,000 volunteers, Kathy Hopinkah Hannan, and NPS Deputy Director Peggy O’Dell walked across the Golden Gate Bridge together, celebrating this new partnership and bringing attention to the amazing outdoor experiences available to everyone at our nation’s national parks and monuments.

“The National Park Service and Girl Scouts of the USA have the same goal in mind: providing meaningful and memorable experiences for girls through unique outdoor experiences,” said Peggy O’Dell, NPS deputy director. “Through this partnership, girls will be introduced to the many ways they can play, learn, serve, and work in our national parks. We are committed to connecting our nation’s cultural and national treasures with today’s youth—so go ‘Find Your Park’!”

New tools for Daisy leaders created by Cadettes for Silver Award

EmmyChloee.jpg

Submitted by Jennifer Morris

Parker

Denver Metro

Are you starting a new Daisy troop? Do you need some ideas for meetings?

Seventh grade Cadette Girl Scouts from Parker Colorado Troop 2851, worked on their Silver Award project. Chloee and Emmy, organized videos reading Welcome to the Daisy Flower Garden, a Daisy Journey book. Also, they created a Pinterest board containing the boards: Daisy Meetings, Games, Daisy Start up Activity, Songs, Crafts, Journeys, Swaps, and Snack Ideas, to help Daisy Leaders with meetings. Also this project is sustainable because the videos are easily accessible as they’re on YouTube and Pinterest. This helps new Daisy Troop leaders to continue years of Girl Scouts. New leaders can use this information to begin their own troops. The Pinterest board helps them by giving the leaders Journey program planning, meeting ideas, and activities. The YouTube channel has Chloee and Emmy narrating the Daisy book stories so the leaders can prepare the next activity.

Check out our YouTube channel and Pinterest Board below.

https://www.pinterest.com/gstroop62851/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxgLP7MqxHE1pDiBjDrkfjw

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.