Category Archives: Girl Scouts News

GSCO History Committee introduces Girl Scout Books in a Bag checkout program

Submitted by Linda Robinson

Loveland

Northern and Northeastern Colorado

Want to find out what Girl Scouts did for fun in the past? Or what they needed to do to earn the top awards of their day? How about learning about the different badges that were available?

All of these things and much more can be learned by looking through Girl Scout books from the past. The GSCO history committee has put together a program called “Books in a Bag”.

This checkout program is made up of canvas bags of Girl Scout books to be used by troops and service units around the state. Each bag is made up of books from a specific program level or topic. Also included in the bags are some suggested ideas on how to use the books.

Each area will be able to decide the best way for members to check out, use the books and then return them to a central site in their area. These books are meant to be kept out in the various areas and should be used as often as possible by the membership.

Bags include Brownie, Junior, and Older Girl grade levels; historic pre-1963 books and books from the Contemporary Issues series from the 1980’s-1990’s. We hope to offer more topic related Books in A Bag in the future.

To find out more about this fun way to explore Girl Scout history please see the display at your local Fallapalooza or minipalooza this Fall.

For questions or comments please contact the Girl Scouts of Colorado History Committee at gscohistory@gmail.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout alumnae visit the GSCO history collection

history center 1 history center 2

Submitted by Heidi Books

Denver

Northern and Northeastern Colorado

In July, the GSCO history volunteers welcomed Girl Scout alumnae and friends for a tour of the GSCO history collection.  Alumnae came from all across the Front Range – Fort Collins to the south Denver area.  They were very impressed with the vast collection owned by Girl Scouts of Colorado and lovingly cared for by the GSCO history committee.

Displays of uniforms, books, badges, and collectibles were set up by the committee.  Also highlighted were activities that troops can do when they visit the history center, as well as uniforms and books that can be checked out and returned.

After the tour, the group traveled to Linda Robinson’s house for a picnic potluck in the shade of Linda’s cottonwood tree.  Wonderful food and fellowship were enjoyed, along with the great views of the Front Range and Northern Colorado from Linda’s backyard.

Total number of Girl Scout membership years was 540.  The youngest member at 29-years-old joined us for lunch; the oldest members have been Girl Scouts for 6 or more decades.

For more information on the GSCO History Center, please email gscohistory@gmail.com. For more information on Girl Scout alumnae activities in Northern Colorado, please email promisepartners@gmail.com. For more information on Girl Scout alumnae activities statewide, please email Heidi Books at Heidi.books@gscolorado.org.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

PART FOUR: GIRL SCOUT WORKS TO EARN GOLD AWARD WITH “IMAGINATION STATION”

Cassidy Gold Award 1 Cassidy Gold Award 2

Submitted by Cassidy, a Girl Scout working to earn her Gold Award with a project called “Imagination Station.”  This blog is the latest update on her progress. To read her previous blog, click here

Hello! I’m absolutely thrilled to announce that my library at Joshua Station is almost complete! Thank you so much to everyone who brought books into Tattered Cover this summer. These books are making an extraordinary difference for the kids at Joshua Station. Seeing them get excited about reading has made my project absolutely worthwhile!

I feel incredibly humbled and blessed by the overwhelming response and support for my project. Overall, I collected just over 2,900 books in donations! Most of these books are on the shelves at Joshua Station right now. Tattered Cover will be giving me a matching donation of 290 brand-new books! I requested that most of these be young adult books so I can build up that section for the teens there. I will be getting these very soon! 🙂

Over the summer, we had two sessions of kids’ book club that met weekly. For the second session, we read The One and Only Ivan and did fun activities that went along with the book. I will continue to do a book club throughout the year that will meet monthly.

This past Thursday, Joshua Station hosted their annual Back to School party where they gave each kid a backpack full of school supplies, and they did different activities and crafts for back to school. Each kid also got to pick out a book to keep to get them started for the school year. I got to help them choose a book, and they were super excited to see so many fun new books! So thanks again for the book donations, they are making a huge difference!

Finally, I’d like to invite everyone who donated books or who would like to see my finished library to the “Library Grand Opening” party on Thursday, September 10 from 6:30-8 p.m. at Joshua Station. Clifford will be there, and we will have other fun activities for the kids. This will also be a time for people to see the reading nook near the front entrance and see Joshua Station as a whole because it’s an amazing place! It will be a wonderful evening, I can’t wait! 🙂

Thanks again for the book donations! My project has turned out more amazing than I ever could’ve imagined!

Troop 3955 earns Bronze Award

Submitted by Jennifer Brown

Wheat Ridge

Denver Metro

Girl Scout Troop 3955 earned their Bronze Award by planting trees on the Wheat Ridge Greenbelt. They also pulled evasive weeds, planted wildflowers, and came back throughout the summer to care for and water the trees. They will continue to be tree stewards for years to come! See the full video. Girl Scout interviews are between minute 6 and 8.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Help organize clothing bank for HOPE

 

Submitted by Amanda Kalina

Englewood

Denver Metro

Annually HOPE Online Learning Academy Co-Op, which is a charter school in Colorado that serves at-risk youth, organizes a back-to-school clothing bank to assist their families who may be homeless or struggling financially. The clothing bank is in a warehouse in Aurora near Children’s Hospital Colorado. We are looking for Girl Scout groups who would like to volunteer the weekend of Aug. 21-23 to help us organize the clothing we’ve collected to give away Aug. 28-29 to our families. We so appreciate the Girl Scout troops who have helped HOPE with projects over the last year, including the organizing of the clothing bank last August (photos included)!! If you are interested, please contact Melanie Stone at HOPE. She can be reached at melanie.stone@hopeonline.org or 303-727-0315.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Juniors complete “Get Moving” Journey

Submitted by Jennifer Brown

Wheat Ridge

Denver Metro

Troop 3955 and 4071 combined efforts and got energized to find ways to reduce energy use. First, we learned ways to be energy smart and completed a building energy audit at Red Rocks Community College. We experimented with various types of light bulbs and decided that replacing CFL light bulbs with LED was a more efficient way to use energy. We presented our ideas to others at RRCC’s Sustainability Celebration. With a donation from Xcel Energy, we delivered and installed 144 high efficiency light bulbs to individuals who are part of a non profit called A Little Help to help reduce their energy consumption. This organization helps older adults thrive in their homes by connecting them with services and resources. We continue to use what we learned throughout this journey in our everyday lives.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Colorado Girl Scouts celebrate National S’mores Day

August 10 is one of our favorite days of the year! Its National S’mores Day!

DID YOU KNOW? The first official s’mores recipe can be found in an official Girl Scouts publication from 1927. The recipe is credited to Loretta Scott Crew, who reportedly made them by the campfire for the Girl Scouts. Originally called “Some Mores,” it is unknown when the name was shortened to “S’Mores,” but recipes for using the longer name are in various Girl Scout publications until at least 1971.

While most people think you have to have a campfire to enjoy s’mores, Colorado Girl Scouts know that is simply not true. In honor of National S’mores Day, they appeared on 9NEWS in Denver to share some of their favorite recipes for making s’mores without a campfire! Click here to watch the segment.

Here are some behind-the-scenes photos from the interview:

Girl Scouts across Colorado also shared the following recipes for making s’mores without a campfire:

No Cook S’more Cone

S’mores Cheesecake Pie

S’more Trail Mix

S’more Trifle

S’mores Bars

S’mores Cookies

S‘mores Ice Cream

 

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Catherine Welch, Highlands Ranch, “ iTech for Seniors”

 

Catherine Welch

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project addressed senior citizens and their connection to technology. Because most of the older generations aren’t as familiar with technology as my generation is, my goal was to increase their knowledge about different electronics in our world today.  I set up multiple open-house technology sessions at Holly Creek Retirement Community. Along with the help of my volunteers, we were able to help over 33 residents with their technology questions.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I created surveys for residents in the Skylark Adult Day Care to complete at the end of every session. This helped me get feedback from the residents. It was a way to help me improve my sessions to ensure all their questions were getting answered.  I also was able to learn what different technology they were having difficulties with and they ranged from cordless phones to iPads.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

After I completed my sessions at Holly Creek, I spoke with several members of my community, sent emails to multiple church youth groups, presented my project to the Centennial Star Service Unit leaders, and posted in the Facebook page for the service unit. Through these efforts, I was able to come in contact with Junior Girl Scout Troop 62599 to carry on my project with Holly Creek. I am so excited that others in my community will be able to see what a rewarding experience this can be. I have also left manuals at Holly Creek so the residents can refer to them on a daily basis.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Technology is present everywhere in our world today and the need for assistance with it is not only present in my community, but it is also present in other communities across the nation, and across the globe. One resident that my team and I helped was able to connect with his grandson on the east coast whom he hadn’t seen in many years. By giving the residents access to this technology, and knowing how to use it, they can be better connected to our society.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about myself while doing this project. I had to figure a lot of things out on my own and sometimes I would get to the end of the rope and think it was the end, but I continued to motivate myself and get the job done. I also used leadership skills like being open-minded to other’s opinions and ideas. When things wouldn’t go how I expected them to, I had to be open to ways around the obstacle. I worked on communication as I worked with a variety of different people and their styles of dealing with others.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project gave me the experience and tools to be able to take on group projects with multiple people. It gave me confidence to take on long-term projects and follow through to the end. It proved my communication skills because of my interactions with older adults, presentations and speaking with people I haven’t worked with before. Using these skills will allow me to be an effective leader and to accomplish my goals despite setbacks I might face.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning my Gold Award was a way to finish out my Girl Scout career. I have been in Girl Scouts since I was 5 and throughout my 13 years I have been able to complete many things, including my Bronze and Silver Awards, so earning the Gold Award was a way to complete the missing pieces to my puzzle in Girl Scouting.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Allison Caperton, Littleton, “Adaptive Gymnastics”

Allison Caperton

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I coordinated a special needs gymnastics camp at JetKids Gymnastics. I hoped to make an impact in the lives of families and children with a variety of special needs. I wanted to give these kids a chance to be involved in such an incredible sport.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by watching the kids grow throughout the weeks, and making sure each kid was gaining something.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The model I created (a four-week adaptive gymnastics camp for children of all ages with special needs) is currently being sustained at JetKids Gymnastics in Littleton, Colorado. An early-summer session was held, and the gym is making plans for more.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

JetKids Gymnastics has a working relationship with many other gyms across the country. By presenting my project to these other gyms and offering my advice and services to help them launch their programs, I am linking the success of my project to a national and global community.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I am smart, strong, able to organize and direct others, sensitive to the needs of my community, able to adapt to challenges, and perfectly capable of making the world a better place. I am proud to represent the Girl Scouts of Colorado with my enduring, global project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I am proud of the lasting legacy I will leave in my community when I go off to college. I feel like I have served not only children with special needs and their families, but also the sport of gymnastics, which has meant so much to me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

If I had not camped with my Daisy troop (when we were just in kindergarten), I might not have learned the strength and tenacity it takes to survive challenges. If I had not found the courage to sell cookies to strangers, I might not have learned confidence. If I had not organized and put into action several Rendezvous weekends for younger girls, I might not have learned the organizational and leadership skills it took to create and implement my project.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org