Category Archives: Girl Scouts News

Daisies collect food for local pantry

Submitted by Tiffany Green

Daisy Troop 4641 coordinated a food drive in our neighborhood to gather food for the local food pantry. In their efforts to make it a more successful drive and cover more area they invited other troops and invited the local Cub Scout pack to help out. With close to 30 kids taking donations (at night in the cold!) they were able to donate 681 food items to the food pantry!

10-year-old Girl Scout writes cookie rhyme for booth time

Abby, Julia T. and Julia R.

Submitted by Rachelle Trujillo

Julia T., 10, Troop 2510 in Wheat Ridge, wrote a cookie jingle for her troop’s first booth sale this Sunday:

You can buy a box or 2 or 3 or 4
but it would be even better if you go for more!

They’re sweet, they’re yummy, they’re tasty, they’re round
and it does no harm to just have ’em around!

You can freeze ’em, you can give ’em, you can eat ’em right there.
They make great gifts, they show that you care.

And if you’re wonderin’ what we’re describing in this small little rhyme,
what we’ll tell you is everybody get ready, it’s Girl Scout Cookie time!

 

Two students from Girl Scouts of Colorado Named Semifinalists for Daniels Scholarship

 

 

 

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado announced today that two students involved in its program have been named semifinalists for the Daniels Scholarship.

Amanda Dugan from Pueblo and Angela Natrasevschi from Fort Collins were nominated for the scholarship by Girl Scouts of Colorado. For the last 100 years, Girl Scouts has been building girl leaders of courage, confidence and character, who help to make the world a better place.

Both Amanda and Angela will earn the highest award in the Girl Scouts, the Gold Award, this spring for projects creating sustainable change in their communities. Amanda, who is a swimmer for her high school, planned a project focused on vocal cord disorder education, especially among athletes. After watching her 17-year-old cousin destroy his life due to his meth addiction, and learning how large of an issue meth addiction is in Colorado, Angela set out to make a change in these statistics by putting together a meth addiction education project for her Gold Award.

These students are among the approximately 700 semifinalists in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming entering the final selection phase for the Daniels Scholarship. In early April, 250 Daniels Scholarships will be awarded to finalists.

In establishing the Daniels Fund, cable pioneer Bill Daniels directed the program to seek out promising students who demonstrate strength of character, a well-rounded personality, potential to give back to the community and other characteristics.

The Daniels Scholarship has grown from a small pilot program with 32 students launched in the year 2000, to awarding some 250 scholarships each year in the spring. To date, 2,262 Daniels Scholarships have been awarded, allowing students to attend colleges and universities across the United States.

The Daniels Scholarship is not “full ride,” but is supplemental to all other financial aid resources available to the student. By requiring students to apply for other readily available financial resources, such as Pell Grants, the Daniels Fund is able to provide even more scholarships to deserving young people seeking to attend college.

Bill Daniels, a cable pioneer known for his kindness and generosity to those in need, established the Daniels Fund to provide grants and scholarships in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. When he died in the year 2000, his estate transferred to the Fund, making it the largest foundation in the Rocky Mountain West.

For more information about Girl Scouts of Colorado, call 1-877-404-5708 or visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Our Girls are struggling with Media Images

Did you know that most 8-18-year-olds spend an average of 10 hours of their day engaging with media? That is more than other activity besides school and sleeping. The messages from these media sources are powerful ones and can limit children’s ideas of what is possible in the world, being detrimental to their physical, emotional and social health. For girls, all of these facets of health are interrelated. A girl’s self-esteem and body image are a critical part of girls’ health and can often be manifested socially and physically.

According to the Geena Davis Institute, in the media girls are often depicted as sexualized objects valued only for their physical attributes and are often depicted as passive and submissive to men with limited aspirations. Even media images directed at children reinforce stereotypes that girls and women must achieve physical perfection to be valued. These representations limit girl’s aspirations and leave them without any active, ambitious female role models in the media to emulate.

The emotional pressure from the media for girls to attain a certain standard of physical attractiveness places negative ramifications on girl’s physical health as is demonstrated in the recent study by the Girl Scout Research Institute, Beauty Redefined: Girls and Body Image 2010. This study found that nearly 90 percent of girls feel pressure from the media to be thin, and 60 percent of girls compare their bodies to fashion models. Only 46 percent of girls believe that the fashion industry does a good job of representing people of all races and ethnicities.

The problem is not only what girl’s think- it’s also what they do. The same survey found that more than half of the girls admit to dieting to try to lose weight and 31 percent admit to starving themselves. These pressures have resulted in younger girls developing eating disorders and undergoing cosmetic surgery. Low self-esteem is also contributing to girl’s decreased success in school and extracurricular activities, premature sexual activity, and unhealthy and unsafe relationships with boys and partners.

Even though we have seen a rise in girl-centric media there is still not an equal playing field or enough positive representations of women and girls. However, if we continue to get the right messaging out there, we can help girls have a more positive body image, higher aspirations, and healthier relationships.

We at the Girl Scouts provide a safe place for girls to grow into women of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. Through the use of the new Girl Scout Leadership Journeys, It’s Your Story-Tell It!, and It’s Your World-Change It!, Girl Scouts of Colorado is bringing new programming opportunities to raise awareness about the importance of promoting healthy media message for girls and women and teaching girls how to create their own media to tell their stories. However, it will take the support and effort of our entire community to ensure that our kids are receiving healthy media images.

Girl Scouts of Colorado asks our community to join us in promoting policies and practices among our local government and businesses to provide healthy media images for girls and women. It is time we make a strong commitment towards creating a community truly invested in girls’ success and health. Together we can create an environment that fosters its children’s health and wellbeing.

To take action locally, visit http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/activities to enroll in our film screening of the 2011 critically acclaimed documentary, Miss Representation featuring a guest panel of local experts and participate in our Healthy Media for Youth Community Conversations moderated by Cynthia Hessin from Rocky Mountain PBS.

For additional information or to share ideas, contact Cortney Healy at Myworld@gscolorado.org

Opportunities to further Support Healthy Media:   

Watch What You Watch PSA

·Watch it. Post it. Share it. (click here for link)

· Pass along the YouTube link to those you care about

· Feature the PSA on your website and social networks


Healthy Media for Youth Act

· Send a support letter to your Members of Congress

· Ensure your organization endorses this legislation

· Encourage others to take action

· Join the Girl Scout Advocacy Network at www.GirlScouts4girls.org

 

Highlight Girl Scout Research and Programming in your work

· Highlight the Girl Scout Research Institute findings

· Feature Girl Scouts of the USA’s newest program, It’s Your Story-Tell It!


Promote the Issue

Help spread the word through your website, blog, Facebook and Twitter.

Finally, please share any ideas or suggestions you might have for us as we move forward by e-mailing Cortney.Healy@gscolorado.org

 Want a new reality? Girl Scouts does too! Stand up for girls and join us to Take Action!

Girls of Service Unit 702 participate in Festival of Trees

Submitted by Marla DeJohn

Each year the City of Greeley hosts the Festival of Trees during the week following Thanksgiving. Businesses, groups, schools and individuals participate by decorating a tree or donating items to a silent auction. the public can get reduced admission by bringing items to donate to the Weld County Food Bank.

The girls of Service Unit 702 participate by earning our display place through working with the children who visit the Festival at the Kids Kraft Korner. The city provides the supplies to make a craft project and a button  and the Girl Scouts help the kids make their projects.

We also create ornaments for our tree that go along with the theme that the leaders decide at our Service Unit meeting. This year’s theme was “100 Years of Friendship.” As you can see, the girls came up with wonderful ornaments and had a great time decorating and viewing the ornaments. They also worked with hundreds of local children at the Kraft Korner.

100th Anniversary Patch design selected

Nicolle H.’s  100th Anniversary patch design was selected from 47 entries in the 100th Anniversary Patch Design Content.  Nicolle is a member of Troop 2510 from Wheat Ridge and Nicolle lives in Lakewood.  Congratulations, Nicolle!

This is a must-have keepsake patch for Colorado girls and will be available at the special price of 100 pennies!  We’ll let you know as soon as they’re in the Shops.

Fort Collins Girl Scouts help seniors through Santa program

By Joyce Kohlmeier

The Senior Santa program was started about 25 years ago and has been run by different people. Troop 884 has always participated in this program. For the past 10 years, it has been run by a Troop 884 Girl Scout who graduated from high school in the year 2000.

The senior citizens that we help are seniors who are considered to “fall through the cracks” so to speak. They may own their own home and cannot get any help from other agencies because of that fact. The names come from a local church.

We are given a senior name and then we start collecting food and other household items through our troop. We talk about dietary needs of the seniors and what we could provide to make sure that dietary needs are met. We also spend time discussing the cost of different items and what might be a luxury item for our seniors that we would never think was a luxury item for ourselves.

This year, we were able to provide a couple eight boxes of food and household items. The seniors appreciated this very much and the girls felt good about being able to help someone in their community.

Young Women’s Forum highlights Girl Scouting at its finest

Photo of Rae Ann Dougherty & Eloise Golden with the Opening Ceremony candle

By Rae Ann Dougherty

In March 2011, I experienced first-hand the leadership development and growth of many young women as a facilitator at a special event held at one of our World Centers, Our Cabaña. The four World Centers (Sangam in India, Our Chalet in Switzerland, Pax Lodge in the United Kingdom and Our Cabaña in Mexico) are an important resource for the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS). WAGGGS mission is to enable girls and young women to develop their fullest potential as responsible citizens of the world.

The Young Women’s World Forum (YWWF) 2011, the second in a series of three centenary projects for WAGGGS, took place simultaneously at all of the World Centers. 157 young women from 81 countries from every corner of the world was represented. It was exciting to have delegates from all five regions at every World Center at the same time! Myself and another volunteer with roots in Colorado (Eloise Golden) were the only Americans at the event held at Our Cabaña. For me it was a powerful experience. For the delegates it was life changing and enhancing!

The event began with the Opening Ceremony; thanks to technology all four World Centers were connected concurrently and Girl Guides and Girl Scouts from all over the world were able to join in the ‘virtual’ celebrations for the first time.

The focus for of this event was WAGGGS’ Global Action Theme, “Girls worldwide say together we can changeour world.” In doing so delegates addressed the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

The YWWF 2011 program focused on the three following MDGs:

  • MDG 1 – “End poverty and hunger”
  • MDG 3 – “Promote gender equality and empower women”
  • MDG 7 – “Environmental sustainability”

These topics were selected in consultation with the young women. The program included the opportunity to develop advocacy skills, the design of a process plan for change by each delegate when they returned home, and field visits with partners.

On the last day of YWWF 2011 each participant made a pledge to implement a project in their own country. Before an emotional closing ceremony, everyone shared their personal pledges. For example:

I pledge to… empower girls to make a change no matter how small – Kerri (Guyana)

I pledge to… train and inspire girls and women to take action on MDGs in their communities – Dominica (Jamaica)

I pledge to… Inform. Inspire. Innovate. – Mandy (Canada)

I pledge to… share my love, knowledge and skills to give hope to other girls and

young leaders, and together we can build a better world. – Nurnuha (Malaysia)

I pledge to… save the environment! – Hanna (Belarus)

As a result of the Forum, each delegate is aiming to realize the following:

  • Implement a community project linked to the MDGs
  • Advocate about the MDGs to their governments and the international community

Thanks everyone dedicated to the mission, these young women are reaching their full potential (and more than they ever expected possible) as they are now motivated to change not just their own lives but the lives of their peers and their communities. Girl Scouting at its finest!

Learn more, “Like”, and follow the events of all of the Young Women World Forum’s at www.Facebook.com/YWWFSite.


 

Girl Scouts make dresses, make the world a better place

From Bonnie Ledet, Adviser, Girl Scout Cadette Troop 84074

For some little girls, a dress made out of a pillowcase and seam tape wouldn’t mean much. But for little girls living in poverty around the world, a pillowcase dress may be their most prized – and sometimes only – dress.

That knowledge spurred Yuma Girl Scout Cadette Troop 84074 to learn to sew. They made forty dresses complete with a handkerchief doll, a note wishing the recipient well, and a new pair of underwear tucked in the pockets of each dress.  Four seventh grade girls, Brittany Ross, Tara Hickman, Destiny Sprouse and Jaeden Chavez, learned to thread a sewing machine, make straight and zigzag stitches, make a casing and insert  elastic, sew on seam binding, attach a pocket, and add lace or rick-rack to make the dress a little prettier. This was quite an accomplishment for girls who had never sewn before!

With the help of their advisors, Brenda Ross and Bonnie Ledet,  and mom, Liz Hickman, the girls started making dresses from pillowcases according to the directions from the Dress-A Girl organization. Dress-A Girl is a nonprofit Christian organization that offers templates and advice for making dresses out of pillowcases and seam binding. Dresses are then shipped to girls in Africa and countries in crisis, such as Haiti.

The girls soon switched from using pillowcases to making the dresses from new material donated by Pat Korf. Pat also gave many yards of rick-rack, lace and other notions. Center Pivot Irrigation made a donation that allowed the troop to purchase the other materials needed to complete the project.  The girls very much appreciate the help provided that allowed them to make the dresses at very little cost to the troop.

The Girl Scout mission statement says that Girl Scouts builds girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place. It took courage for the girls to use a sewing machine for the first time. They gained confidence as they successfully completed the dresses and showed their character as they took the time to make the dresses and dolls to be sent out to other girls around the globe, making the world a better place.

Sources-
sewingmachine.today