Category Archives: Girl Scouts News

Daisies and Brownies help homeless

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Daisy Troop 4419 and Brownie Troop 4145 along with help from Alyssa, a Cadette Girl Scout, collected, wrapped and donated hundreds of pairs of socks, underwear and toiletries to a homeless outreach program in Aurora. Together Daisies and Brownies teamed up to sort the donations, and wrap them in colorful Christmas paper.

During their meeting the girls discussed homelessness in our state, they discovered what programs our community has in place to assist those in need, as well as how they can help those in need. The girls discussed what they thought were the most essential items to donate to those in need.

The girls came away from the meeting thankful for what they had, and for how they can help others.

CEO Corner: Building Girl Scout Confidence

I got a phone call this weekend from a friend whose daughter is in my son’s 6th grade class. She says her daughter worries a lot about if she is liked by the other kids, especially the boys. She wants to wear makeup and clothes that my friend doesn’t think are age appropriate. That got me thinking about how hard it has to be a kid these days, especially a girl. How women and girls are shown in the media, especially on reality TV shows, has such a powerful impact on how we treat each other. In fact, a recent study by the Girl Scout Research Institute found that tween and teen girls who regularly watch reality TV “accept and expect a higher level of drama, aggression and bullying in their own lives, and measure their worth primarily by their physical appearance.”

That’s why Girl Scouts of Colorado is ramping up our focus on giving girls the confidence and tools they need to navigate those tricky situations they move through every day – programs like Power Up, to help them understand and defuse bullying situations, and Fight Like A Girl Scout, to help them recognize and act when they’re threatened. It’s why we’re involved with efforts recently like The Colorado Clothesline Project, addressing issues of violence against girls and women. (View photos and video from this event.) And why we’re planning a Feb. 23rd viewing of the film Miss. Representation , which explores how the media influences perceptions – and misperceptions – of women.

As we ramp up these efforts, we’re looking to our community to support us by volunteering for one of these programs and/or making a donation to help offset the costs of providing them. To learn more about how you can volunteer for or donate, visit Girl Scouts of Colorado’s website.

We’d also like to ask you to show your support by weighing in on a “healthy media” poll put together by the Geena Davis Institute, Girl Scouts of the USA and the Healthy MEdia Commission. This poll will hopefully get lawmakers and the entertainment industry thinking about just how much influence they have on building women leadership in this country.

It’s sad that girls like my friend’s daughter feel so much pressure when they are so young. Girl Scouts is all about helping girls to see that their value isn’t in what they wear, what others think of them or the girl drama. Join me and Girl Scouts of Colorado in helping our girls grow up to be strong, brave, capable leaders.

Colorado Springs Girl Scouts take on City Hall

From “Proud Troop Leader” Monica Hobbs

city hall 021

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To earn their Girl Scout Bronze Award, one of the highest awards in Girl Scouts, 5th grade Junior Troop 1947 of Steele Elementary in Colorado Springs, aimed to get a crosswalk at a dangerous intersection near their school. Neighbors had tried for years and suggested maybe the city would listen to Girl Scouts.

The four members – Kalyana, Alexa, Chloe and Lauren – divided up the responsibilities – school, neighborhood, city and media – and when a city traffic engineer gave them a flat out “no,” it didn’t stop them. They researched safe options and built a support team of neighbors and experts; made a PowerPoint presentation of their findings and a video of the intersection and got the support of their neighborhood association board and school; they collected signatures on a petition and even found funding with a grant. Alexa Huesgen Hobbs said,”It was so exciting to see how everyone wanted to help us – most of the things we found out just by talking to people.”

Their advisors told them to take it to the citizen’s forum at City Hall, but first meet one-on-one with a couple key City Council members. (In fact, one of the City Council people they worked with was Jan Martin, a former Girl Scout and Girl Scout Woman of Distinction, who are women leaders in the community.) To create buzz and generate support on the day of the presentation the troop placed signs at the dangerous intersection, invited neighbors to attend and contacted the local media. The media story ran as the second story on the 5 o’clock news and lead at 10 and was front page on the local paper’s website, being picked up by other internet news sources to include MSNBC (this story includes a link to the video the troop created about the intersection). The next day the newspaper story ran big in print on the third page! Chloe Hilby said,”It felt awesome trying to help the community.”

The troop was able to get support from the City Council in these ways. The Council not only gave the Girl Scouts a “yes,” but praised them for their well prepared and thorough presentation, and, most importantly, for not taking “no” for an answer.  They wanted young people to know that they really can make a difference. (View video of the troop’s presentation to the City Council) Kalyana Gallagher said, “It was a great experience and super fun! I learned teamwork, responsibility and safety, for sure.” Lauren Sutz added, “I learned that it is more important to help the community than yourself. When you help the community you are helping yourself.”

Did I mention these girls are 10 years old?

 

Girl Scouts of the USA also covered this story on their blog

The Prides and Joys of being a Girl Scout Volunteer and Troop Leader!

Written by Troops 4130 and 2013 Leader, Christina Burke

The girls in Girl Scout Troops 4130 and 2013 have worked hard in their first year of Girl Scouting! As Girl Scout Daisies (with the exception of Mikayla, who is a second year Girl Scout Brownie), they sold cookies and made a terrific donation to the Children’s Hospital Colorado in Denver. During their Daisy Journey activities, they earned several awards.

The girls also went to Disney Princess on Ice, the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, did a World Thinking Day activity and much more! As Brownies, they have participated in the Postcard Exchange with many troops, the Fall Product Sales where they made a substantial amount of funds for their troop and Girl Scouts. Our troop is now working on Legacy Badges and additional Journey awards.

Being a volunteer and Troop Leader for these girls has been an inspiration to me. I have learned to be more patient and nurturing. I am also learning the values of the Girl Scout Journeys with my co-leader, Erika. I hope to volunteer for many years to come and look forward to watching ours girls become the very best they can be.

Troop 2013 Leaders Erika Beeman/Christina Burke. Brownies: Mikayla. Addie, Sara, Lexi, Hailey and Angie.
Addie welcomes her sister Bella into Daisies!
The girls bridge into Brownies!

 

Brownie Troop 2013

Four Girl Scouts from Troop 10015 bridge to Seniors by crossing Gunnison River

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Submitted by Kelly Weak
Cadette/Senior Troop 10015

I’ve attached pictures from our bridging ceremony held on Sept. 18. Four girls crossed over the Gunnison River on a swinging bridge. We also welcomed a new Cadette to our troop. It’s been awhile since Gunnison has had any Senior Girl Scouts, so I thought we should share our great news!

Girls build playhouse for cats for Bronze Award

Written by Aspen P., and Taylor W.

For my Girl Scout troop’s Bronze Award project, we are building a sort of ‘play house’ for the cats and kittens at our local humane society. We decided to do this, of all other things, because we have worked for the Humane Society before and it was very fun. The people are very nice, understand our good intentions, and help us as much as they can so that we can succeed.

We also choose to do this for our project, because we love animals- especially cats- and want to help these homeless animals as much as we can.

We have discussed it, and found that building this play house would not come cheaply. Our troop went to speak with a local hardware store and they said that the only way they could donate materials to us would include us filling out paperwork, and would take about a couple weeks, which was after we needed to get the Bronze Award done so that we may bridge to be Cadettes.

Instead, we bought some of the ‘scraps’ from the hardware store, which were much cheaper than actual measured pieces of wood. Other than that, the other things we have used have all been generously given to us by our troop leader- such as paint, nails and other such tools. We thank our Troop leaders so much for the effort they had put in to help us with completing our award.

There’s no place like home!

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More photos from the project

Written by Denver Metro Area Troop 640 leader, Crystal Ellis

Our Girl Scout Cadette troop consisting of six girls decided to acknowledge the volunteers at Habitat for Humanity as our Hometown Heroes through the 2011 Cookie Program. The girls felt that the organization contributes to the community by helping people have a home of their own made them heroes. The troop collected 61 boxes of cookies and delivered them to a building site last spring, where they met with the volunteers working on the house. The girls were given a tour of the “home,” and a brief overview on blueprints and carpentry.

The troop did not want to stop at collecting cookies, and expressed interest in contributing more to Habitat for Humanity. However, due to age restrictions, helping to build a home was not an option. So the girls investigated what Habitat needed and decided to try their hand at carpentry. They chose to build flower boxes. They spent their troop funds on supplies and a Saturday afternoon in the garage. They learned about carpentry and picked up a few power tools! The troop built five flower boxes.

This fall, our troop was invited to participate in a home dedication on September 11, 2011 in Aurora, Colo. The girls went shopping for flowers and potting soil so the homeowner could plant the flowers in the boxes. The troop toured the finished home. They were amazed to see the finished product, thinking back to the building site they visited in the spring. All this started with blueprints and wood, combined with the hard work and dedication of the many volunteers at Habitat for Humanity!

The troop was very proud to be a part of the dedication ceremony and were given a moment for our Troop Cookie Director to say a few words. The girls placed the finished flower boxes on the porch railing to give the homeowners something to add to their new home.

“It was great to do something for all of the volunteers that work so hard to help other people. I am happy we could help and make a difference in the life of another person,” explained Rachel, a Girl Scout and member of Troop 640.

Our troop discovered many things about themselves, the community and the world through this service project. But the thing that stood out the most for them is that there really is no place like home.

Girl Scout Troop 70239 publishes a book about bullying

Submitted by Lisa Wellington
Troop 70239 leader

Girl Scout Troop 70239 has published a book for their GirlTopia Take Action project. After doing research on issues facing girls and interviewing experts, the troop members decided that “girls being mean to each other” and “girls bullying each other” were the issues they cared most about addressing.

It so happens that this troop has also been teaching Power Up Bully Prevention workshops for three years. And the Power Up curriculum was in need of some updating. One part of the Brownie Power Up curriculum in particular needed updating: the coloring book that was used for the curriculum was out of print and more copies could not be obtained. Troop 70239 girls decided they would write a new book, even better than the old one, built up from their own childhood experiences and using their teenage wisdom. The first workshop using the new curriculum and the new book was held on Sept. 10 in Fort Collins and received great reviews. 100% of participants said they learned how to be a better friend, and learned ways to help a friend who is bullied. You can buy this 80-page book for $8 from CreateSpace.com via this link: https://www.createspace.com/3676197. (P.S. we wish we could offer the book to you all for less money, but the CreateSpace people keep 90% of the proceeds. We’d just like to earn enough to cover the cost of the proof copies we’ve had printed for ourselves throughout the publishing process. )

Back cover of book:

After Hannah says she doesn’t want to be Claire’s friend anymore, Hannah begins to bully Claire using a handshake that used to be theirs. Claire, distressed by the situation, doesn’t know what to do. I Don’t Want To Be Your Friend Anymore explores four different ways for Claire to deal with the bullying. Including multiple scenarios, tips for bullies, and paper dolls, this book is great for any grade school girl or her adult mentors looking to learn more about friendship bullying and how to deal with it.