Category Archives: Girl Scouting at Home

Virtual programming resources

Blending Badge Series in Your Troop’s Experience

Leaders, are you looking at this upcoming Girl Scout year and feeling a little uncertain about how to engage your girls in a virtual setting? We are here to help! Girl Scouts of Colorado has launched a new virtual program called Badge Series. Each month we provide online learning modules that instruct girls on how to complete badges and some months we even start a Journey!

Join us on August 19, 2020 from noon – 1 p.m. for a virtual chat where we will share some tips and tricks on how to blend badge series into your troop’s experience and take some of the stress of planning off your shoulders.

Register now: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2020/blending_badge_serie.html

Want the information, but can’t make the time? Still register and we will send you a link to the recording.

Questions? Email GirlExperience@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step Three of Five

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

Step Two: Make Decisions in a Group

Step Three: Explore Civil Debate

A debate is a discussion between two people who have different opinions on any given topic. It is important to know how to draw on facts and logic to support your point of view. It is essential to stay calm. Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, “Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade,” and the point of a debate is to persuade others to your point of view. A great way to persuade others is to keep an open mind their point of view and to find common ground!

Choose one or more of the following activities

Watch candidates for elected office debate. It could be for any office – from your local school board to the U.S. Presidency. After the debate, discuss with your Cadette troop or your family the arguments on all sides, and whether the candidates found any common ground – or whether they were even looking. Where the candidates persuasive? Why or why not?

OR

Understand a famous debate in history. It might be a debate over the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s, or between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas in the 1860s. Find out why the debate was important to American history and who is considered the winner and why? Did the debaters find any common ground? Did they look?

In the next step, you will learn to understand how to compromise.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend 2020

Girl Scouts love the outdoors, especially in Colorado! Girl Scouts of Colorado and Colorado Parks and Wildlife have teamed up for Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend September 12 – 13, 2020. This year, Girl Scouts and their families can participate in Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend virtually, in -person, or both.

Participate Virtually

Follow along with virtual programming hosted by Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) throughout the weekend featuring interactive videos on outdoor skill building, highlights from state parks, conversations with subject matter experts, and more. Girls can also visit an interactive map with 50 virtual tours of state parks from all 50 states!

Check the Girl Scouts of Colorado Events Calendar one month prior to the event for more information about how to participate in virtual programs. Be sure to RSVP even if you are participating virtually to make sure you receive all the information via email one week prior to the event.

Participate In-Person with Self-Guided Programs at Colorado State Parks

Get outdoors, enjoy the weather, connect with your troop/family, and explore your local state park! Girl Scouts, troops, and families are invited to visit select Colorado State Parks over the weekend of September 12 – 13, 2020 for the opportunity to participate in a variety of self-guided programs. Programs vary by park, but may include: self-guided nature trails, young naturalist books, junior ranger programs, nature journals, adventure activity backpacks, ‘Agents of Discovery’ augmented reality experiences, and more!

This is not a drop-off event; girls must attend as part of a troop or with a caregiver. Park entrance fees of $9 per car apply. All child and adult attendees agree to follow the most current GSCO COVID guidelines in relation to in-person events and have completed a COVID waiver. Read the most current in–person event guidelines here. Complete the GSCO COVID waiver online here.

RSVP here to receive an email one week prior to the event with more information on the specific self–guided activities at each park and where to pick up self-guided program resources when at the park.

Below is a list of participating parks who will have self–guided programs available:

  • Ridgeway State Park, Ridgeway
  • Eleven Mile State Park, Lake George
  • Cheyenne Mountain State Park, Colorado Springs
  • Mueller State Park, Divide
  • Sylvan Lake State Park, Eagle
  • Stagecoach State Park, Oak Creek
  • Staunton State Park, Pine
  • Castlewood Canyon State Park, Franktown
  • Boyd Lake State Park, Loveland

Girl Scouts Love State Parks patches are available for purchase online at girlscoutshop.com or through the GSCO Retail Shop by emailing retail@gscolorado.org. To use Cookie Credits to pay for your patch, be sure to tell the GSCO Shop Associate when ordering your patch.

Finally, don’t forget to share the fun on social media! Be sure to tag Girl Scouts of Colorado on Facebook , Twitter and Instagram and use #gscolo and #gsoutdoors. You can also share your stories on the GSCO Blog using the Share Your Stories Form.

Questions? Email inquiry@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step Two of Five

 

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

Step Two: Make Decisions in a Group

In this step, you will need to work in a group. It could be planning and running your next Cadette meeting online; planning, shopping for, and cooking dinner with your family; or doing a big house project. The key goal is to make at least six decisions together as a group, such as when, where, and what you’ll eat; what you will accomplish in your meeting; who is responsible for which aspects of the project. Afterwards, discuss how the common-ground strategy you discovered in Step One affected your group’s ability to make decisions. Were compromises made for the good of the whole group? Did you trade for something you really wanted? How do you think the common-ground strategy would work at the local government level? At the state level? In Congress?

Decision Making Strategies

Majority Rules: Ask the members of your group their top three options. Write down the two most popular, and then have the group vote. The choice with the most votes wins.

Consensus or compromise: You really want to try a new Moroccan recipe. Your mom would rather a tried-and-true Mexican favorite. You could put a new spin on an old recipe, or agree that this time you’ll make the favorite and next time you’ll branch out. You both like Chinese food. Could you have chosen this instead? Discuss the options with your group until you’ve reached a decision everyone is happy with.

Pick at random: Make a numbered list with everyone’s choice. Roll a dice to choose one at random. You can also draw names out of a hat, flip a coin, or draw straws.

Use one or more of the methods above to help you make decisions in your group project.

In the next step, you will be exploring civil debate.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts of Colorado recognizes Women’s Suffrage Centennial

August is National Women’s Suffrage Month, join Girl Scouts of Colorado as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment and women’s constitutional right to vote! Suffrage is the right to vote in political elections and suffragists are people who advocate for the extension of the right to vote, especially to women. As we celebrate you will see this moment in history referred to as the “Women’s Suffrage Centennial”, “Suffrage Centennial”, or the 100thanniversary of the 19th Amendment.

This special blog post briefly explores the history of the women’s suffrage movement and lists opportunities and resources for Girl Scouts to learn more.

Special thanks our partners at the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame, League of Women Voters of ColoradoNational Park Service, and Girl Scouts of the USA for bringing together unique opportunities for Girl Scouts to recognize this moment in history.

About the Women’s Suffrage Centennial

The 19th Amendment states, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.”

According to the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission, “Suffragists began their organized fight for women’s equality in 1848 when they demanded the right to vote during the first women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York. For the next 72 years, women leaders lobbied, marched, picketed, and protested for the right to the ballot. The U.S. House of Representatives finally approved the Susan B. Anthony Amendment, which guaranteed women the right to vote, on May 21, 1919. The U.S. Senate followed two weeks later, and the 19th Amendment went to the states, where it had to be ratified by 3/4ths of the-then-48 states to be added to the Constitution. By a vote of 50-47, Tennessee became the last state needed to ratify the 19th Amendment on August 18, 1920. Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby issued a proclamation declaring the 19th Amendment ratified and part of the US Constitution on August 26, 1920, forever protecting American women’s right to vote. Today, more than 68 million women vote in elections because of the courageous suffragists who never gave up the fight for equality.”

As we recognize this important moment in U.S. history it is important to note that the language of the 19th Amendment included all eligible votes but not all eligible voters, especially women of color, could exercise their right to vote.

The 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative reminds us, “First of all, the Constitution in 1920 mandated a minimum voting age of 21, so the 19th Amendment allowed for women 21 and over to vote. Then, although the 19th Amendment included women of color, many were unable to vote. In the southern United States, restrictive state or local laws called for poll taxes and/or literacy tests before a citizen could vote. Eighty percent of African Americans lived in the southern U.S. in 1920. As more black women moved north, they were able to vote more freely. Full exercise of black voting rights was intended with the Voting Rights Act of 1965; however, even today some states continue to erect barriers to black voting. Native American women were largely excluded from voting before the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924; some states and localities still passed laws effectively barring Natives from voting until the late 1940s. Not until the late 1940s and 1950s were restrictions on Asian American voting removed.”

GSCO Virtual Programs

Suffrage Centennial with the Women’s Rights National Historic Park

Wednesday, August 5, 3 – 4 p.m., all ages

A National Park Ranger will talk to girls live from the Wesleyan Chapel. The Wesleyan Chapel is the location of the First Women’s Rights Convention held on July 19 and 20, 1848, in which approximately 300 people gathered to attend. It is considered by many historians to the formal beginning of the Women’s Rights Movement in the United States.

Girls will learn about the history of women’s right to vote and have an opportunity for a live Q&A session with the National Park Ranger.

Suffrage Centennial Celebration with the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame and the League of Women Voters of Colorado

C/S/A: Monday, August 10, 4 – 5:30 p.m.

D/B/J: Friday, August 14, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Girls will learn about the suffrage movement and the women who shaped history. They’ll explore how these actions set the stage for women’s rights throughout history, how the Women’s Rights Movement is still a part of our current lives, and how, through advocacy, we have the power to impact the lives of others. Representatives of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame will teach girls about the history of the movement and about Colorado suffragists, and representatives from the League of Women Voters will talk to girls about how they can take action today to make the world a better place.

Girl Scout patches and activities

  • Girl Scout Ranger 19th Amendment Patch Program: The National Park Service and Girl Scouts of the USA are commemorating the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment with a limited-edition commemorative patch, activity guide, activity log, certificate, and special awards. The Girl Scout Ranger 19th Amendment Patch Program will enhance Girl Scouts’ understanding of the significance of the 19th Amendment which removed the gender restriction to voting and granted many women the right to vote. Celebrate the advances that resulted from the suffrage movement and key historical figures who were involved.
  • The Complete Suffrage Toolkit: The materials and activities in this toolkit will inspire girls to discover the history of women’s voting rights and civic engagement. Through these activities, girls will connect, have multigenerational conversations within their communities, better understand the gender barriers that have been broken, and celebrate the women who broke them.
  • The Suffrage Art Projects: Check out these fun art projects that take inspiration from what early suffragists did to call attention to their cause. Get creative and put your own twist on these entertaining activities. 

Colorado Specific Activities and Resources“As the first state to enact equal suffrage through popular vote – on November 7, 1893 – Colorado has a lot to commemorate . . .”

At Home Activities

Online Exhibits

Still to Come in August!

  • National Civic Action: Promote the Vote
  • Women’s Voting Rights around the World from the GSCO Global Action Team

Resources

19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: Women’s Right to Vote (1920) – https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=63

2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative – https://www.2020centennial.org/

“Between Two Worlds: Black Women and the Fight for Voting Rights” – https://www.nps.gov/articles/black-women-and-the-fight-for-voting-rights.htm

Library of Congress – https://www.loc.gov/exhibitions/women-fight-for-the-vote/about-this-exhibition/

National Archives – https://www.archives.gov/women/suffrage

National Park Service – https://www.nps.gov/subjects/womenshistory/19th-amendment.htm

National Parks Service, Article Series “Suffrage in America: The 15th and 19th Amendments” – https://www.nps.gov/articles/series.htm?id=EA334AEE-A3B5-5979-737829A71446739C

National Women’s History Museum, The Woman Suffrage Movement – https://www.womenshistory.org/resources/general/woman-suffrage-movement

PBS – https://www.pbs.org/kenburns/not-for-ourselves-alone/womens-suffrage/

Smithsonian Institution – https://americanhistory.si.edu/democracy-exhibition/vote-voice

Voting Rights Act (1965) – https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=false&doc=100#

Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission – https://www.womensvote100.org/

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Available NOW at the GSCO Shop: Mystery Boxes

Mystery Boxes are now available at the Girl Scouts of Colorado Retail Shop! There are three sizes to choose from and they range in price from $10 – $25.

  • $10 Box: Minimum of three items worth at least $20
  • $15 Box: Minimum of three items worth at least $30
  • $25 Box : Minimum of five items worth at least $50

What’s in the box? It’s a mystery!

To order yours, call (303) 607-4880, email retail@gscolorado.org, or use this online form: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/about-girl-scouts/gsco-shop.html. To use Cookie Credits, simply tell the retail associate when contacted about your order.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Kick off your Girl Scout year by attending a VIRTUAL Leadership Summit

Leadership Summits, learning opportunities for adult volunteers, will be offered virtually  for Fall 2020. That means you will get the skills and knowledge needed to provide a positive Girl Scout experience all from the comfort of your own home!

While we are unable to meet in-person right now, volunteers will still have the opportunity to learn new things, share and discuss ideas, and connect with other volunteers. The training courses offered are designed to equip leaders with the tools for success!

There are four opportunities to attend each training course. You do not need to attend all of the courses offered each day. You can pick and choose the day and time that work best for you and register for each course individually.

  • September 8 – 11 (weekdays)
  • September 18 – 20
  • September 26 – 28
  • November 6 – 8 

Visit the Training Events page on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website for links to register! Please contact training@gscolorado.org for questions.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Book Craft for “The Bad Seed”

 

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to “The Bad Seed” by Jory John.

Materials Needed:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White paper or colored construction paper
  • Markers

If the construction paper is not available, shapes can be drawn on white paper and colored.

You will need:

  • Two Seed bodies
  • Four Eyes
  • Two Black strips for eyebrows

Draw thick and thin stripes on seed shape.

Glue on eyes and draw mouth. The bad seed.

Repeat steps on second seed shape but give it a happy face. Glue on the band-aid. Now, you have the good seed!

Glue seeds on construction paper and draw hands and feet.

Which are you today? The bad seed? Or, the good seed?

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Happy Birthday Our Chalet: Activities for Friday, July 31, 2020

Submitted by the GSCO Global Action Committee

On Friday, July 31, Our Chalet celebrates its 88th Birthday! Girl Scouts of Colorado sends their best wishes to Our Chalet, one of the five World Centres of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts.  This is going to be an exciting and fun week with five days of celebration for this birthday! Do you like it when your birthday celebrations spread out over more than one day? If so, watch the GSCO Blog each day so you can celebrate with girls from all around the world.

Today, July 31 , Our Chalet celebrates its 88th birthday! How do you like to celebrate your birthday? Our Chalet is 88 years old this year! Could you put 88 candles on a cake? That would be dangerous. So, let’s do a chocolate or a cheese fondue instead. Your girls can do these with a little help from an adult. So, have fun and celebrate Our Chalet’s big birthday!

Hope you have enjoyed the week of visiting Our Chalet and Switzerland.

Now, here are eight more reasons why EVERYONE should visit Switzerland and the Swiss Alps!

  1. Skiing — top spots for skiing in the world. The World Cup has been held on the slopes just outside Adelboden.
  2. Scenery — Mountains, lakes, blue skies. 38 peaks more than 13,000 feet
  3. Culture —
    1. Alpenhorns, yodeling, cows and cowbells, cuckoo clocks
    2. Yodeling has evolved from a way to communicate between goat herders in the mountains to a form of music often associated with Switzerland. The alpenhorn was also used by shepherds and almost disappeared but is now a national symbol and entertainment for tourists
  4. Hiking — Lots of trails measured by the time it takes to hike from one place to another not measured in miles
  5. Quaint Alpine Villages
  6. Food — Cheese fondue, Chocolate
  7. Matterhorn — World’s most photographed mountain
  8. Top of Europe — To get to the top of the mountain, one takes a train to the highest railway station in Europe to view the two peaks — the Jungfrau and Monch

Travel

Now, maybe you have gotten the travel bug yourself! Did you know that you can travel with Girl Scouts? It’s a big world. Girl Scouts love to dream about where they can travel—from the field trips they might take as Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors to the global adventures available as Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors. If you love exploring different places and cultures, you can experience all that our country has to offer, and you can plan even bigger adventures around the world, traveling with other Girl Scouts who share your dreams and love of adventure. Interest in the world has been an integral part of our movement since the very beginning. As Juliette Gordon Low, founder of Girl Scouts of the USA stated:

“Girl Guiding and Girl Scouts is the magic thread which links the youth of the world together.”

If you would like to know more about travel and adventures go to: forgirls.girlscouts.org /travel

This blog has been brought to you by the members of the Girl Scout of Colorado Global Action Team.  If you have any questions or comments please direct them to gscoloradoglobal@gmail.com.

RESOURCES FOR MORE GLOBAL GIRL SCOUTING INFORMATION

WAGGGS website

World Centres Websites

World Centres Facebook

GSCO website

GSCO Global Action Team Video

GSCO Global Girl Scouting Flyer

Destinations, Getaways, and International Events

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cadette Finding Common Ground badge: Step One of Five

The great thing about our country is we all can have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions, and still come together and work towards the common good. No matter the level of government – from your local school board to the Congress – people have to compromise – give up some things you want in order to support somethings someone else wants – in order to accomplish their goals. When you earn the Cadette Finding Common Ground badge, you will learn how governments do that – and how you can do it in your everyday life.

Step One: Get to Know Someone Different from You

The best way to learn to find common ground with others is to learn that we have more similarities than differences. By learning about perspectives that are different from ours, we will find that our priorities are often in line with each other, even if we have different ways of approaching them.

Do one or more of the following activities to learn about how others see the world.

Difference of Background

Have a conversation with someone from a different country, state, or town who lives in your community in right now. Ask them about their journey, and the reason for their move. Ask them what their life was like before the move, and what their life is like now.  What aspects are the same, and what is different? Share with them your favorite parts of your neighborhood, to help them feel at home.

OR

Difference of Belief

Learn about someone who has a different belief system than you do. Maybe, you have a friend from school who practices a different religion than you do, and you can attend an online service. Maybe, you can interview the youth leader of an interfaith alliance.  Maybe, there’s a member of your family who has the opposite political leanings than your household. Have a respectful discussion about your similarities and differences.

OR

Difference of Opinion

Everyone has differences of opinions. Find a friend whose favorite food is something you can’t stand, or who won’t watch your favorite TV show. Have a discussion about their likes and dislikes, and your likes and dislikes. Try their favorite food, and have them try yours while you have a watch party of each other’s favorite shows. Share at least two things you liked about the other’s favorites.

Up nesxt, learn how to make decisions in a group.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.