Category Archives: Girl Scouting at Home

Virtual programming resources

Get Outdoors with Girl Scouts

While we can’t gather in person with our troops or at camp, check out these links to practice your outdoor skills, work on outdoor badges, get outside with your family, and spend time in the great outdoors this summer. Make sure to stay safe by staying up-to-date on the current COVID -19 guidelines on travel, outdoor recreation, social distancing, and more by visiting the Colorado Department of Health website and reading the Leave No trace recommendations on recreating outside in a COVID-19 era.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

2020 World Environment Day Activities

 The Girl Scouts of Colorado Global Action Team is so excited that you will be celebrating 2020 World Environment Day on June 5! Below are the activities for you to complete at home. We recommend completing these activities the week of June 5, but you can dive into them anytime!

Step One: Watch the World Environment Day video from the Global Action Team.

Step Two: Complete at least one of the two activities listed below.

Option One: Measure one square foot. Go outside and choose an area of land—it doesn’t matter where as long as it is about one-foot square. Carefully observe this small space. See how many things you can notice within that foot, things that no one has ever looked at before. This particular blade of grass. This unique pebble. Maybe an insect or a worm going about its day. How many unique things can you find in one square foot? Take about ten minutes to observe your square foot then write down all the unique things you found.

BONUS: Observe more than one square feet in different places! How many unique things did you find?

Don’t forget to track where you’ve measured one square foot and how many unique things you found!

Option Two: Watch “Ask a Scientist about Cuba’s Biodiversity” from the American Museum of Natural History. Ana Luz Porzecanski answers children’s questions about Cuba in this video interview. She is a conservation biologist at the American Museum of Natural History.

Answer the following questions:

  1. What is biodiversity and why is it important?
  2. What percentage of the world’s species of frogs are found in Cuba?
  3. What is a hutia?

Step Three: Complete the activity listed below based on your Girl Scout level.

Daisies – Learn about animal habitats

Materials needed:

  • Plastic bottle, 1-2L in size, or milk container
  • Items from the backyard: small sticks, leaves, bark, pinecones, or recycle clay pots
  • Paper
  • Pencil, crayon, or pen

Take a Hike. Go out on a nature hike either in your backyard, on a trail, or at the park. Be on the lookout for flying insects. Which ones did you see? Flies, bees, ladybugs, or butterflies? Write them down or draw them on a piece of paper.

Did you know that insects live in many places? They live in the ground, on bushes, in trees, and even in your house! Learn about animal habitats and where bugs live by watching this video.

Did you know that by kicking an ant hill or taking the leaves off a tree that you might be destroying a bug’s habitat? We wouldn’t want that! How can you protect their homes? Think of the ways you can help protect an insect’s home and write them on your paper.

Build an animal habitat. Now you’re going to build an insect habitat. Once done, you can either hide it in a bush or near the ground, or even hang it up in the tree. It’s up to you! Just follow these steps, or watch the video, and you will have your own insect habitat!

  • Get a 1L or 2L plastic bottle. Ask a grownup to help you cut it in half and then cut off the closed ends. You want to make sure you have a cylinder tube with an opening on both ends.
  • Next, you will start to put in the sticks and bark pieces into the tube. You will want to stack everything into the tube, including any pinecones, leaves, and clay pot pieces.
  • Once everything is inside the tube nice and tight, your new insect house is complete! You can either place it in a rock bed, near some bushes, or even tie a string around it to hang in a tree.

Thanks for being a great Eco Learner and learning about how you can help protect insect habitats.

Brownies – Biodiversity Bingo!

Materials needed:

Using the Biodiversity Bingo board (linked above), find five items in a row up, down, or diagonally. Take a walk around outside. Check off all the items you saw outside. You could even put a number in each square of how many you saw.

Consider the following questions as you look for items:

  • How many kinds of birds did you see? Did they have different coloring or size?
  • How many kinds of animals did you see that had four legs.?
  • Did the leaves that you found come from trees that had different shapes- some trees tall and slender, some trees large and spread out?
  • How many kinds of trees taller than you did you see? Pine trees, trees with flowers on them, Trees with seeds on them.

How many Bingos were you able to make?

If you couldn’t find everything in the squares, perhaps you might like to explore a little farther into the neighborhood to try to find more items. Indicate where you saw each of the new items you have found.

Note:  As you answered the questions above you are showing the diversity of your area.  The higher the number of kinds of different plants (trees, flowers, etc.). – or different animals (birds, dogs, cats, rabbits, squirrels) you saw indicates how diverse your area is. If the immediate area is only parking lots with little grass and wooden structures with no trees or flowers or animals, then the area wouldn’t be very diverse.

Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors – complete the three sections below.

Sometimes it can feel overwhelming, when we are constantly bombarded by messages that we are running out of time to protect our planet and that everything is going wrong.

When we don’t know what to do, it can be easy to just decide there is nothing that can be done, tune out, and go back to whatever we were doing. However, there is a lot we can do; there is a lot that people all over the world are doing!

Educating ourselves about the issues and other human’s actions is a great place to start. The task feels a whole lot less overwhelming when we know we are not fighting alone!

Over the course of this week, spend some time exploring these different resources. Find what components of biodiversity are particularly interesting to you and learn how they interact with each other. When we are really interested in what we are trying to work on, it is much easier to stay motivated to stick to our path.

Section One: Learning About Biodiversity

Do you like to read to learn more?

  • Start by exploring the Youth and United Nations Global Alliance’s Youth Guide to Biodiversity.
  • Start with the first section on page 13 and read the section about What is Biodiversity?
  • Then look over the table of contents on page five and see what seems interesting do you! Do you want to know more about how people are affecting biodiversity? What is interesting about biodiversity on land or in the oceans? What is happening about biodiversity in agriculture?

Or, perhaps you would rather watch videos?

Or, have discussions with your friends?

Section Two: What are other people doing?

There are tons of places on the internet where people are sharing the activities and projects they are doing. After taking Girl Scouts of the USA’s Internet Safety Pledge, search the internet to find what other people are doing or start exploring at these links.

Section Three: What can you do?

Steps Four and Five: If you registered to participate in the 2020 World Environment Day program, check out the email you received on May 31 for information about completing Steps Four and Five.

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at home: “Mother Bruce” craft

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to reading “Mother Bruce” by Ryan T. Higgins.

Materials needed:

  • Construction paper
  • Glue
  • Crayons/Markers
  • Scissors

You will need one large brown circle (head), one medium light brown circle (nose), two small brown circles (ears), a medium size black triangle, and four large white egg shapes.

Glue ears on head. Glue black triangle on upper portion of light brown circle, then glue onto head.

Once dried, draw two small black dots for eyes and small upside down line for his frown. Next, draw a thick wavy line (tilde) for Bruce’s eyebrow. Embellish his ears and head with lines for fur.

Don’t forget Bruce’s goose eggs!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Voice for Animals badge Part Five of Five

Girl Scouts can earn the Senior Voice for Animals badge at home with help from our Outreach Program team. By earning this badge, you will find out about the complex relationship between animals and humans, so you can make informed choices and help others make them too.

Choose an issue that affects animals and find out more. Don’t forget to take Girl Scouts of the USA’s Internet Safety Pledge first!

Some example issues are below. Feel free to choose one from the list, or one of your own.

  • The need for dog and cat neutering
  • Hunting and fishing – some is for sport, some for commerce, and some for food
  • Pet food recalls– How is pet food developed and made healthy for pets?
  • How to assist pets in natural disasters
  • How are shelters and zoos being affected by the stay-at-home orders, and what do they need most
  • Animals in labs for cosmetic testing
  • The role of zoos in animal conservation and endangered species protection
  • Bully breed bans
  • Animal hoarding
  • Treatment of farm animals
  • Exotic animals as pets
  • Emotional support animals vs. service animals
  • How the increased use of ingredients such as palm oil are affecting animals in the wild
  • Adopting shelter pets instead of buying from breeders
  • Any other topic related to animal welfare that you can think of!

Two Options – Choose one!

Compose an editorial. Present your issue in an opinion article and send it to the local newspaper. You can also post it in your own blog, or on a website devoted to your issue.

OR

Create a public service announcement. Put your audiovisual skills to work and create a two-minute video or slideshow to get your message across.

Whichever one you choose, we want to know about it. Share it on the GSCO Blog, FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Make a COVID-19 Time Capsule

Your Weekend Challenge from GSCO Camp Staff is to make a COVID-19 Time Capsule! If you need some help getting started, use this printable:

COVID-19_Time_Capsule

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Share Your MINTS

Girl Scouts of Colorado Camp Staff encourages you and your family to share positive attributes about yourself and others as part of an activity called Encourage-MINTS, Accomplish-MINTS, and Excite-MINTS! Learn more about this activity here.

This week, we want you to celebrate yourself! Record your own encourage-MINTS, accomplish-MINTS, and excite-MINTS using this printable: My Mints Printable

This program can also be done virtually, so be sure to  send virtual MINTS with Girl Scout sisters or other loved ones!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Listen now: Meet a Forester Webinar

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado thanks Danielle Ardrey and Kelsey Lesniak for co-hosting our “Meet a Forester” webinar! More than 30 Girl Scouts from across Colorado participated in this webinar on May 27, 2020. Missed it? Listen to the recording now.

Danielle is a Conservation and Youth Education Specialist and Kelsey is a Forester. Both women work for the Colorado State Forest Service. Kelsey taught Girl Scouts about her work to manage and maintain healthy forests in Colorado and Danielle talked about Project Learning Tree and the other wonderful educational resources the Forest Service has to offer. Girl Scouts asked lots of wonderful questions about wildfire safety, trees, and life as a forester. We all learned that Kelsey’s favorite tree is a spruce and favorite Girl Scout cookie is a Samoa. Danielle’s favorite tree is an elm, specifically the one in her backyard, and her favorite Girl Scout cookie is a Thin Mint with Tagalongs coming in close second.

Listening to this webinar satisfies Step Two of the Cadette Trees badge: Dig into the amazing science of trees.

Here are some resources from the Colorado State Forest Service:

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Voice for Animals badge Part Four of Five

Girl Scouts can earn the Senior Voice for Animals badge at home with help from our Outreach Program team. By earning this badge, you will find out about the complex relationship between animals and humans, so you can make informed choices and help others make them too.

Every year, at county fairs and the National Western Stock Show, animals are used for sport and entertainment. From dog agility shows, Mutton-bustin contests, rodeos, and 4-H projects, children and adults are entertained statewide by animals as small as birds and rabbits and as large as bulls and horses. We also have several zoos and aquariums in Colorado, where animals are put on display for entertainment and education.

Choose an animal to research. It might be a farm animal being raised as a 4-H project, lives in a zoo, or travels across the country competing in rodeos. Write a short story, poem, article, or create a blog post or video from the point of view of the performing animal. What would you imagine a day in their life is like? What would that animal want its owners or handlers or keepers to know? How has its daily life changed due to the stay-at-home orders? Is it happier or sadder?

Share your creative piece on the GSCO Blog, FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Mask Making Service Project

Now, with this nationwide mask-making campaign, all girls have the chance to step up to help their friends, neighbors, and frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) has partnered with Feeding America, a network of local food banks across the United States, to make it easy for your girls to amplify their efforts.

  1. Ask your girls (and their friends!) to make masks for adults and children. Use the instructions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). If your girl chooses to make masks for other children, use 7.5” x 9” cloth instead.
  2. When you are ready to send your masks, you can include a letter like this.
  3. You can safely distribute masks where you see the greatest need in your community (check out these ideas). Through this partnership with Feeding America, you can easily donate masks to your local food bank staff and families who rely on food bank services.
  4. Inspire others to give back! Share your photos and videos on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and here on the blog. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo and #GirlScoutsGiveBack.
  5. Don’t forget to come back and log the number of masks you made!
  6. If you wish to recognize your troop’s participation with a patch, we recommend this Girl Scouts Give Back patch.

Check out some more detailed guidance.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Earn the Girl Scouts Love the Outdoors Challenge Patch

Summer is the perfect time to get outdoors safely while social distancing! While you’re at it, join the Girl Scouts Love the Outdoors Challenge. You’ll enjoy nature, channel your creativity, learn fun new things, and EARN A COOL PATCH. If you are unable to complete an activity due to social distancing guidelines, you can find an alternative. Take a virtual tour of a park online, gaze out of a window, or look through family photos of outdoor adventures. Drawing a picture works too!

Here’s how to get started:

  1. Check out the activities. Learn more about the Girl Scouts Love the Outdoors Challenge patch here: https://www.girlscouts.org/content/dam/girlscouts-gsusa/forms-and-documents/at_home/GSlovesOutdoors_Woorksheet_v5.pdf
  2. Nominate someone. We may be distanced, but we’re certainly not distant! This challenge is a great way to connect with your fellow Girl Scout sisters and invite your non-Girl Scout besties to join in the fun! Nominate someone to take the challenge with you.
  3. Be prepared. As Girl Scouts, we know the importance of being prepared! If you’re venturing to a local park or hiking trail, first make sure they’re open. Pack sunscreen, bug repellant, snacks, protective gear (sunglasses, hat), and water!
  4. Get your patch. Remember, you don’t have to do all 51 suggested activities to earn your snazzy new patch! Complete the required number of activities based on your grade level.

Don’t rush! The Girl Scouts Love the Outdoors Challenge doesn’t end until Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend, September 12–13, 2020. This means you have plenty of time to select the activities you’re most interested in and complete them at your own pace.

As you earn this patch, be sure to share your photos and videos with GSCO on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and here on the blog. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo and #gsoutdoors.

The Girl Scouts Love the Outdoors Challenge is possible thanks to Johnson & Johnson. Johnson & Johnson has been championing women and giving them the tools, resources, and opportunities to succeed at work and at home since its founding more than 130 years ago. Johnson & Johnson’s generous support of the Think Like a Citizen Scientist Journey for Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors prepares girls to experiment, explore their environment, and push boundaries in healthy ways, all while learning how they can improve the world through STEM.

Head to the GSCO website to find more links to practice your outdoor skills, work on outdoor badges, get outside with your family, and spend time in the great outdoors this summer.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.