Category Archives: Girl Scouts News

Gold Award Girl Scout delivers featured speech at Women of Distinction Breakfast

Gold Award Girl Scout Kathleen Otto of Fort Collins was a featured speaker at Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Women of Distinction Breakfast in Grand Junction.  She told the audience of Girl Scouts and supporters about her journey through Girl Scouts.

My last 12 years as a Girl Scout has given me so many opportunities to learn and grow, making me the person I am today. This morning, I’m thrilled to share my amazing experience in Girl Scouting with you.

I remember the first Girl Scout meeting I attended. I was in first grade and a new Brownie. My troop would meet in the library of my elementary school and I remember we would have tables lined up in a big “U” shape so we could all see one another. We spent time learning the Girl Scout Promise and Law—and at every troop meeting we would stand to say the Pledge of Allegiance and then the Promise and Law to remind ourselves of how to behave toward one another and our community every day. Of course, being 6-years-old, I did not yet realize what a remarkable family and community I had joined.

Being a Girl Scout helped me learn important business and people skills and one of the most well know skill building opportunities is, as you all probably know, selling cookies. The first thing I learned about selling cookies was to be charming! This tip works well when you are still a Brownie, but as you become older, it gets a little trickier. Once I reached middle and high school, selling cookies door-to-door required connections and loyal customers that had known me since I was a little Brownie. But, the best way to earn and sell cookies was always at a booth. I remember I was in 4th or 5th grade, it was January, and snowing. My friend and I stood at a cookie booth outside of Safeway for 30 minutes, which seemed like forever at that age.  Over 45 minutes passed and we thought to ourselves, “Why did we sign up for a two-hour booth?!” My friend and I were shivering in our boots and snow pants, we were so bored, and no one was coming to buy cookies. Eventually, I was so cold and tired that I decides to let out my pent-up energy, by singing and dancing.

My journey through Girl Scouts did not stop at cookie booths. During my Junior and Senior year of high school, I had the opportunity to earn the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouting.

The Gold Award gave me the opportunity to teach people about a topic that is very important to me – dyslexia. I wanted to educate both parents and teachers about dyslexia and how it impacts children in school settings. This is an important topic for me because I am dyslexic and without the teachers I had, who knew about dyslexia, my school experience would have been so much harder. Without the support system I had growing up, and the teachers I had I don’t think I would have graduated high school with a 4.0 GPA or would have been as prepared as I feel for college.  My Gold Award was a two-step process. First, I organized a viewing of the documentary “The Big Picture – Rethinking Dyslexia”, a story about of people who struggle with dyslexia, and their stories of how they overcame their disability. After the movie, I held a panel discussion with dyslexia experts, who included: a doctor, who specializes in diagnosing dyslexia; teacher, who works specifically with children with learning disabilities;  student and lifelong friend, who suffers from dyslexia; and representative from the Rocky Mountain branch of the International Dyslexia Association. The panel discussion was eye opening for everyone who attended and gave people the chance to connect with others in the community, whom they might have never met without my project. Many parents with children who have dyslexia were able to come together and find understanding with each other and help each other find support for their children.

Step two of my project was to create a Little Free Library in my neighborhood to promote literacy among both adults and children. In all the books that are in the library, I put informational bookmarks provided by the Rocky Mountain branch of the International Dyslexia Association in the hope that I could not only encourage people to read, more but also to continue educating people about dyslexia.

Through earning my Gold Award, I learned many skills required of a successful leader. I learned how to best communicate with my peers and adults, along with programing, public speaking, and marketing skills. I had tapped into each of these skills throughout my years as a Girl Scout and perfected them through earning my Gold Award.

These are the concrete skills that Girl Scouts has taught me, but it also opened doors to see the world. Last summer, I had the chance to go on one last trip with my Girl Scout troop and we decided to go to Europe. With the funds, we earned from the Girl Scout Cookie Program, along with our own money, we went on a 15-day trip across Europe. We went to amazing places and saw wonderful things. My favorite part of our trip was going to Adelboden, Switzerland, and visiting Our Chalet – one of five World Centers of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. The beauty of Our Chalet and the town of Adelboden was incredibly stunning and peaceful. learning the history of how Our Chalet was founded was truly a learning experience and showed me that Girl Scouting really is an international sisterhood.

In addition to traveling around Europe, I had the opportunity to be a camp counselor at Tomahawk Ranch, one of the Girl Scouts of Colorado’s summer camps. After being a camper almost every summer and then a counselor in training, becoming an official counselor at 18 just seemed like the natural next step in my relationship with Girl Scout Camp. Becoming a counselor, I could, make sure that younger girls had the best summer possible. I remember the Director of Tomahawk, Monica Gray, aka Obi Joe, told us during our training – “Camp is a safe place for girls to come and be themselves.” That is what camp was like for me as a child and that is what I wanted camp to be for girls today. Working at Tomahawk is like being in a totally different world. The Director Team at Tomahawk does such an amazing job at making camp a wonderful and amazing experience for every girl. 

One day, half-way into a two-week session, all of the counselors are living off of coffee at this point I thought to myself at lunch, “I knew someone would do it! I knew someone would dip the lettuce in the chocolate!” This might seem completely odd statement, so let me explain. 

For lunch, we were having fondue and there was a chocolate fountain for dessert, our chef spoiled us, with all the fixings you would expect – strawberries, pound cake, bananas, and more. But, these desserts were set on a bed of lettuce, and I thought to myself watch one of these girls dip the lettuce into the chocolate and eat it up. Sure enough, one of my girls came back to the table with chocolate covered lettuce, and everyone started laughing as she began to eat it! I can tell you now that chocolate and lettuce is not a good combo, but everyone laughed, smiled, and tried something new and surprising.

This is the point of Girl Scout Camp – it is random and funny and sometimes completely unexpected. But, no matter how unexpected things are, you’ll always be met with a welcoming smile. Camp is one of the safest places for girls to go where they can be themselves without being branded weird or different. Girl Scout Camp is a safe place for girls to grow and find out who they would like to be and all the amazing things that they are capable of.

Each of these stories describe what Girl Scouts has done for me. Girl Scouts has been the place for me where I can be myself and grow into a person that I didn’t know I could be. Girl Scouts is the reason I can stand before you and speak clearly and with confidence. Girl Scouts is the reason I know I will always have a home and a family no matter where I am. The skills that Girl Scouts has taught me, has given me the self-confidence to live on my own, to start my freshman year of college with only a little trepidation.

This year, I am a freshman at Colorado Mesa University. As of right now I am just starting my core education classes, but my plans are to go into the medical field as a nurse. Girl Scouts has shown me that I love people and enjoy helping my community. Girl Scouts has help teach me that I can achieve whatever I set my mind to.

I want to remind you all the mission of Girl Scouts, “Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.” I stand before you this morning, a Girl Scout for over a decade and a woman with the courage, confidence, and character to continue becoming the best person I can be and make the world a little better every day.

Thank you all so much.

 

 

Get parade ready this Thanksgiving

From Girl Scouts of the USA

Mark your calendars! Girl Scouts will be once again be showcasing their leadership style at the Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade!

No matter where you are, join Girl Scouts, R&B platinum-selling artist Andra Day, and rap superstar Common to stand up for something you believe in. When you spy the Girl Scout float, take to social media and share what you stand for using #GIRLagenda and #StandUpForSomething.

If you plan to be in New York City on Thanksgiving morning, use this list to make the most of the inspiring celebration. Let’s do this!

  1. Pick a viewing location.  A Girl Scout is always prepared! Our map will help you scope out the best views of the parade—don’t forget to get there early. For more parade tips, visit macys.com/social/parade. To watch with your fellow Girl Scout sisters, we will have special meet up locations on the WEST side of Central Park West and 75th Street and WEST side of 6th Avenue and 45th Street. 
  2. Bring your SWAPS. What better way to meet new Girl Scout friends than by making SWAPS (Special Whatchamacallits Affectionately Pinned Somewhere) to trade at the parade? In case you didn’t know, SWAPS, an honored Girl Scout tradition, are small, girl-made tokens of friendship exchanged among Girl Scouts who meet while traveling. It’s so much fun! 
  3.  Visit Girl Scout Headquarters. After your parade adventure, take a stroll up to 37th Street and 5th Avenue to check out Girl Scouts of the USA’s national office at 420 5th Avenue. The building will be closed Thursday, but the Girl Scout sign out front is a great backdrop for a photo op. 
  4. Shop your favorite Girl Scout gear. Be one of the first to visit Girl Scout Central, our all-new store, and grab the latest Girl Scout gear or some gifts for your Girl Scout sisters back home—they’ll love it! The shop is located on the bottom floor of the national office and will be open on Black Friday from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM and 12:30 PM to 3:30 PM.


Can’t join us in the city? That’s OK! Participate in these four ways from the comfort of your own home.

  1.  Tune in! The 91st Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade airs nationwide on NBC on Thursday, November 23, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. across time zones.


  2.  Get creative. Take “I Spy” to the next level by coloring your findings and drawing in your favorite Girl Scout badges using the “Building a Better World” coloring sheet.
 
  3. Celebrate the Occasion. Don’t forget to visit the Girl Scout Shop to pick up your Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade photo or commemorative patches to remember the event. Plus, the all-new parade float ornament is the perfect way to showcase your Girl Scout pride all holiday season long. Quantities of these special-edition items are limited, so don’t miss out. 
  4. Give back to your Girl Scout sisters. This year has been especially difficult—between Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria and the wildfires ravaging California, many Girl Scouts across the United States have found themselves in challenging situations. This Thanksgiving, while sharing what you are grateful for, take a moment to donate to those in need. And don’t forget to save the date: Girl Scouts of the USA will be joining forces with Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council to host a special Facebook Live on November 28 with more ways to help.


Now that you’re ready to celebrate, don’t forget to follow along on FacebookTwitter,and Instagram on Thanksgiving Day to catch behind-the-scenes moments from the parade and so much more!

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twenty-five Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing take action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Meg Bleyle from Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, worked to increase the bee population by teaching children about how people need and depend on bees.
  • Beth Bolon from Longmont hosted a workshop for sixth grade girls to help them improve their communication skills and bolster their confidence when interacting with others.
  • Cheyanne Bridges from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with the Pikes Peak Humane Society to support their animal medical fund by providing a sustainable source of donations from her school.
  • Tara Butler from Denver, Overland High School, created a course and curriculum specifically for senior citizens to educate them on how to use their smartphone and better understand the technology.
  • Kayleigh Cornell from Aurora, Grandview High School, started the Colorado Book Bank and collected more than 1,300 new and gently used books for students in a summer lunch program.
  • Victoria Delate from Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, created a four-week self-defense course to give her fellow students the knowledge and skills to protect themselves from sexual assault.
  • Emma Deutsch from Denver, Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning, improved the cat rooms at the Denver Animal Shelter. By creating a more welcoming and colorful space, she encouraged more people to adopt cats.
  • Kamaryn Evans from Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, worked to raise awareness for victims of domestic violence and for the Crisis Center, which works to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and prevention.
  • Rose Goodman from Boulder, Boulder High School, created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees.
  • Elizabeth Hoelscher from Aurora, Grandview High School, partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage victims of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls.
  • Ashlin Hult from Niwot, Niwot High School, created a series of materials for middle-school girls to encourage healthy body image and increase self-esteem.
  • Zoi Johns from Golden, Lakewood High School, coordinated the installation of three 10,000-liter water filtration tanks in a school in rural Uganda.
  • Makayla Kocher from Monument, Colorado Springs Christian School, created an art program for nursing home residents.
  • Kayleigh Limbach from Niwot, Niwot High School, wrote aguidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academic future.
  • Alexis Montague from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, hosted a panel discussion so girls could learn more about career opportunities in STEM.
  • Sarah Ness from Centennial, Eaglecrest High School, hosted nearly two dozen after-school art therapy sessions to help kids at her school relieve and manage stress.
  • Gwyneth Ormes from Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, organized a series of after-school workshops to teach elementary school girls Processing (a basic programming language), along with the foundational concepts of computer science.
  • Emma Parkhurst from Centennial, Littleton High School, revitalized The Lions Cupboard, a local clothing closet, to make the space more accessible for families in need.
  • Makala Roggenkamp from Arvada, Faith Christian Academy, partnered with Hope House and created book templates for children to develop a love of reading.
  • Abagail Sickinger from Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to help high school students get a job. Topics included: resume writing, what to wear, conducting yourself during an interview, and how to answer interview questions.
  • Katrina Stroud from Boulder, Niwot High School, created an activity booklet for The Butterfly Pavilion to teach children about Monarch butterflies and bumble bees.
  • Grayson Thomas from Lyons, Lyons High School, designed a mural of diverse and significant members of the STEM community for Lyons Middle/Senior High School.
  • Marieke van Erven from Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.
  • Melissa Wilson from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, developed several materials to educate people who can hear about how to interact with those who are deaf.
  • Inspired by her mother’s battle with cancer, Susan Wilson from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a media center for cancer patients undergoing treatment at Parker Adventist Hospital.

The Girl Scout Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

About Girl Scouts of Colorado

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Girl Scouts march in Veterans Day parade

Girl Scouts of Colorado partnered with the Colorado Veteran’s Project to show veterans how much we appreciate their service by marching in the Denver Veterans Parade on Saturday, November 11, 2017. We believe that honoring our service members is one way we can say a big “thank you” to those who committed to serve their country. This year, we had record 150 registered participants sign up to march in the parade!

Our fearless leader Lucy, Girl Scout Senior, called out commands to the Cadette-level  flag bearers Brooke, Emily, Emma, Faith, Cailet, Ada, and Zandria. The color guard posted seven flags: the current USA flag, the Colorado State flag, Girl Scouts of Colorado flag, a 48-star flag to represent the period between WWII and the Korean War, a GSUSA flag, and a Brownie Flag, in addition to many personalized troop flags and banners. A huge thank you to the Honor Guard representatives from the Douglas County Sheriff and Arapahoe County Sheriff offices. Their team educated our color guard on flag etiquette for the parade. The Girl Scouts started on the sidelines to cheer the first half of the parade and set the mood with chants of “U. S. A!” Throughout the day we raised morale with rounds of “Make New Friends” and renditions of “Old Glory.” When we arrived at the review stand the Girl Scouts wowed the judges with a recitation of the Girl Scout Promise.

We also want to thank the GSCO History Committee! They provided authentic historical uniforms from 1939-1953, ensuring that our entry was historically accurate between the WWII and Korean War entries. The history committee is committed to educating the community on Girl Scout history and traditions. Consider working with them for your next event or to complete your Troop Excellence Patch.

Girl Scouts know the importance of teamwork and also partnered with Saluting America to deliver Tribute Cards to veterans. Each Tribute Card has a patriotic image, inspirational quote, and personal message from a Colorado-based school student. Our Girl Scouts delivered tributes to veterans observing and participating in the parade and festival. This was a great opportunity to facilitate a discussion about “who is a veteran?” Our girls realized that anyone can serve their country and the best way to learn if someone was a veteran is to simply ask!

Would your Girl Scouts like to march in a parade? Join us for the Olde Golden Christmas Parade on Saturday, December 9! Your troop can select current or historical uniforms—and troop banners or wagon floats are encouraged! Sign-up before November 24 to get in on the fun: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d45aaac22abfe3-join

GSCO STEM events this fall

Girl Scout Day at Dinosaur Ridge, Morrison

More than 200 Girl Scouts, friends, and family enjoyed Girl Scout Day at Dinosaur Ridge on Oct. 14, 2017. Girls met several badge requirements by doing hand-on activities with different STEM organizations and toured the fossils at Dinosaur Ridge. One of the best things about this event is that it is both a Girl Scout and a family event. While the event was geared towards Girl Scouts, there was something for everyone.

GSCO would like to thank the Molly Brown House, Western Interior Paleontological Seaway, National Park Service, Libby Talks, the Great Denver Gem, and Mineral Council and Women in Mining for providing great activities for our girls!

A BIG thank you also goes to GSCO Volunteer Support Specialist Toni Dondero for helping with registration! More than 70 percent of our participants paid through a walk-up registration, so Toni’s help was invaluable. A BIG thank you goes to Erin LaCount at Dinosaur Ridge and her amazing crew of volunteers that hosted a great event!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engineering Day with the Society of Engineers at the Colorado School of Mines, Golden

More than 100 Girl Scout Juniors earned the first part of the new Robotics badge at Engineering Day hosted by the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden on Oct. 7. SWE students planned and taught the whole event. A favorite activity was asphalt cookies, yummy treats made of chocolate and oats by rolling the ingredients between waxed paper and canned goods which girls brought for the activity and later donated.

Girl Scouts also had fun at over 10 different STEM stations where they made binary bracelets, lava lamps, engineering machines, and towers, statistics (thanks to the use of Skittles), and how germs spread at the Oogie Boogie table. The activities were taught by some of the most active SWE students as the Colorado School of Mines’ SWE chapter is the largest in the nation. A big thank you goes out to Jenna Lucas, SWE’s Engineering Day Chair; Agata Dean, faculty advisor, and the members of SWE who hosted this great event!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ford Girls Fast Track Race, Fort Collins

80 Girl Scouts from Northern Colorado and the Front Range raced pine wood derby cars at the Ford Girls Fast Tracks race on Sept. 30 in Fort Collins. Girls made their own cars, fine-tuned their car’s design with the help of a Ford Engineer, and competed fiercely to win.

Ford generously sponsored the race and GSCO was one of eight councils nationwide that received a grant to host the event. Girls received a free car kit, t-shirt, food, and a special event patch. Check out the racing action in this video aired on Fox 31/KWGN-TV here . Two Ford engineers were onsite and counseled girls on ways to alter their cars to win. A favorite part of the race was seeing each girl’s car and the thought and creativity they put into each design. Another favorite part was seeing the proud smiles of the girls racing their cars!

A BIG thank you goes to Julie Gallagher, Gayle Richardson, Elise Barrios, Carol Griffin, and Amy Myers for being the GSCO Race Pit Crew! We’d also like to thank Ford and their team for a great race day.

Upcoming Events

Check out these fun GSCO Events! GSCO Staff are welcome to stop by these events to check out what our Girl Scouts are doing first-hand or enjoy our Girl Scout discount at these sports and entertainment events.

Nov. 18 – Project C.U.R.E., Denver. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (troops can choose 1 of 3 sessions). Cost: $6 per kit donated. Come learn about Project C.U.R.E. and pack a kit for donation. Fun activities and event patch included. Register here. This is our biggest event of the year, so GSCO staff members are welcome to stop by and check out what the girls are doing!

Dec. 2 – Girl Scout Teddy Bear Toss with Metro State Hockey, Westminster. 3:45 p.m. game start. Cost is $1+ teddy bear/stuffed animal to donate/person or $5/person without a teddy bear. Cheer on Metro State at they take on CU Hockey. Participants will toss their bears on the ice when Metro State scores their first goal. To register, please contact Victoria Fedorco atmsuvictoriaf@gmail.com  with contact info and number of tickets needed. She will follow-up with further instructions.

Dec. 8 – Disney on Ice, Denver. Cost: $17.75 + online fees. Disney on Ice presents “Follow Your Heart.” Post-performance Girl Scout clinic will highlight the Tech Crew and the special work they do to put on the show. Event patch included. Ticket information can be found here.

Mesa County Commissioners commend Girl Scout Troop 2214

Submitted by GSCO Team Lead Cindi Graves

Western Slope

Grand Junction

Mesa County Commissioners commend Girl Scout Troop 2214 for its devotion to the Girl Scout mission and values, and for earning the distinction of Bronze Award Girl Scout. The Girl Scout Bronze Award is the highest honor a Girl Scout Junior can achieve by completing a girl-led project to benefit the local community.

Charlotte A., Megan F., Braeleigh M., Preslee R., and Elizabeth S. have become Bronze Award Girl Scouts through recognizing a need for teens and tweens entering foster care and creating care packages filled with items to help with the difficult transition for youth entering foster care.

The Commissioners extended their appreciation to Girl Scout Troop 2214 for their innovative and compassionate effort to serve the youth in foster care in Mesa County.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Volunteers needed: Parade of Lights

The 9NEWS Parade of Lights, Colorado’s largest holiday parade, is in Downtown Denver on December 1 and 2, 2017. We are currently looking for volunteers to participate as costumed characters, banner elves, and grandstand ambassadors. These volunteers (12-years-old and older) will be assigned to a unit and specific costume and face paint. The volunteers will march the two-mile parade route (under the supervision of a unit captain) in character while waiving at the thousands of locals who come to watch the parade each year.

Persons interested in participating in this year’s parade should go to www.denverparadeoflights.com and fill out an application as soon as possible. Positions are filling up quickly!

Girl Scouts perform in The Nutcracker

Submitted by Alison Jaramillo

Metro Denver

Westminster

Treat yourself to a magical evening with Clara and the nutcracker as Littleton Youth Ballet casts a spell over your family with its captivating production of The Nutcracker. A number of Girl Scouts are participating. Show times are Friday, Dec. 1, 2017 at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 2 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Dec. 3 at noon and 4 p.m. Performances will be at the Joanna Ramsey Theatre at Westminster High School 6933 Raleigh St. Tickets range from $20 to $36. Parking is free. Please call (303) 794-6694 for tickets or visit the website at www.littletonyouthballet.org.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Closing the STEM gender gap, one Girl Scout badge at a time

From Girl Scouts of the USA 

It’s no secret that there are fewer women than men in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields today. In fact, women hold less than 25 percent of STEM jobs, despite filling close to half of all jobs in the U.S. economy. And women who do hold STEM jobs earn 33 percent more than those in other industries—making the gender wage gap comparatively smaller in STEM fields. 
At Girl Scouts, we’re more than ready for a change—and STEM leaders start here, with us. Since our founding in 1912, Girl Scouts has introduced girls of all ages, from five-year-old Daisies to high school Ambassadors, to these important fields to help them see for themselves how they can improve the world using valuable STEM skills.
We are the foremost experts in preparing the next generation of female STEM leaders. Want proof? Girl Scouts are almost twice as likely as non–Girl Scouts to participate in STEM activities (60 percent versus 35 percent), and 77 percent of girls say that because of Girl Scouts, they’re considering a career in technology. 

It all starts with a badge. Girl Scouts has more than 35 of them—many introduced earlier this year—that challenge girls to stretch their STEM skills to make the world a better place. And because everything behind our badges is girl-led and girl-approved, we believe each badge can be an important step a girl takes to help close the STEM gender gap once and for all. 

Only 1 out of 3 environmental engineers are women. 

Meet the Water badge for Girl Scout Ambassadors.
With the Water badge, Ambassadors learn innovative ways to find, treat, and conserve this natural resource. Girls can explore the engineering behind dams and water treatment plants and how they help the environment. They might look into hydroelectricity and how they can use it to power the community and address environmental concerns. Or they could get inspired to design their own water filters or initiate rainwater collections to save drinking water. Talk about innovative! Earn this badge

Meet the Trees badge for Girl Scout Cadettes.
Cadettes put their naturalist hats on when earning their Trees badge, digging into the science of trees—from identifying different species on a hike to learning about all the ways we can protect them. Girls make connections between how trees benefit the earth and the people on it, including as components of fuel, medicine, shelter, and more. And as any Girl Scout would, girls use their new tree knowledge to take action in their communities! Earn this badge

Just 1 in 3 chemists are women. 

Meet the Home Scientist badge for Girl Scout Brownies.
Thanks to the Home Scientist badge, Brownies can tap into their inner scientist by conducting various (fun!) experiments in their own home. Girls can test density, concoct tasty treats using the principles of science, discover how carbon dioxide reacts with other compounds, marvel at static electricity, and so much more! Get that periodic table ready! Earn this badge

Roughly 1 out of 10 physicists and astronomers are women. 

Meet the Sky badge for Girl Scout Seniors. 
Seniors are doing more than looking at the night sky when they earn their Sky badge. They’re studying specific stars, constellations, and planets. These girls can learn how telescopes work and how astronomers use them to study the universe. Seniors are also exploring the world of aviation and space missions! How cool is that?! Earn this badge.

Fewer than 1 in 5 women are industrial engineers. 

Meet the Inventor badge for Girl Scout Brownies.
On their way to earning the Inventor badge, Brownies put their STEM skills to use to solve key problems. After warming up their inventor’s mind, girls come up with a list of problems they see play out every day that they’d like to solve. They then pick one they’re especially passionate about and strategize an innovative solution—drafting designs, presenting their ideas to friends and family, and even building prototypes! Earn this badge.

Fewer than 1 in 4 computer and information scientists are women. 

Meet the Website Designer badge for Girl Scout Seniors.
What’s awesome about our Website Designer badge is that girls decide what their website will be about. They might elaborate on a favorite hobby, highlight progress on their Girl Scout Gold Award project, create a digital journal—whatever their passion! With this badge, girls can learn to build a website from scratch, program, and create site blueprints and wireframes. They can also dive into web design, learning about fonts, imaging, and more. And once their site launches, girls are tasked with getting the word out about it! Earn this badge.

Just 1 out of 10 electrical or computer hardware engineers are women. 

Meet the Robotics badges for Girl Scout Daisies.
Through earning these three badges, Daisies learn all about robots, including how they solve problems in STEM fields. Girls brainstorm ways a robot could solve one of their own problems, learn how engineers talk to robots by programming algorithms, and use their new skills to create a robot prototype! Did we mention Daisies start in kindergarten? Now if that’s not impressive… Earn these badges

Less than 8% of mechanical engineers are women. 

Meet the Programming Robots badge for Girl Scout Juniors.
Juniors put their coding skills to the test when earning their Programming Robots badge. After learning about the intricacies of robots, including the sensors that make up a robot’s “brain,” girls program their own algorithms to instruct robots to move and react in a certain situation. The algorithms are then translated into a special code that girls can test and correct using a device of their choosing. Earn this badge.

Discover more Girl Scout STEM badges (and our other fun badges!) via our Badge Explorer. And this is just the beginning! Over the next two years, Girl Scouts will launch 18 Cybersecurity badges and a series of Space Science badges. We’re so excited!

In related news, earlier this week we announced a brand new initiative to reduce the gender gap in STEM fields by bringing millions of girls into the STEM pipeline over the next eight years. The Girl Scout STEM Pledge is an initiative that seeks to raise $70 million by 2025, affecting 2.5 million girls. To support the Girl Scout STEM Pledge, visit www.girlscouts.org/STEMpledge.

 

Packing for Impact with Project C.U.R.E.

Join us for Project C.U.R.E. and Packing for Impact this month! Girl Scouts in the Western Colorado and Metro Denver regions will collect basic medical supplies to create kits for Project C.U.R.E. Packing for Impact will have two events, one in Grand Junction on Nov. 12 and one in Denver on Nov. 18. Girls participating in both regions will get a special event patch.

Girl Scout troops in Western Colorado kick off our 2017 Packing for Impact event on Sunday, Nov. 12. Area troops will gather from 1-3 p.m. at the Girl Scout Service Center in Grand Junction to pack their kits, enjoy fun activities, and learn more about Project C.U.R.E. Interested Girl Scouts will want to sign-up for supplies to bring at https://goo.gl/YavfSG . Please sign up quickly as spots are filling fast. A big thank you goes to the Mesa County Service Unit and Troop 10065 for organizing this event and sponsoring kits!

Our Packing for Impact event continues Saturday, Nov. 18 as troops in Metro Denver gather at Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children in downtown Denver to bring their donated supplies and pack kits. Girls will learn more about the countries that Project C.U.R.E. serves, first-aid, and safety through fun activities. There’s still space for this event and volunteer opportunities, but Girl Scouts will want to sign up quickly as this event has sold out quickly in the past. Cost for the Denver Project C.U.R.E. event is $6 per kit. Please note this event’s fee is per kit, not girl. Troops can decide how many kits they would like to donate and pay the fee for those kits. To register, go to https://goo.gl/UJNto5 and choose from three different sessions.

We still have spots for older Girl Scouts to volunteer at the activity tables. This is a great volunteer opportunity for Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors and especially, to fulfill Program Aide internship hours. To volunteer, please go to https://goo.gl/ehzwdj . Questions? Please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org.