Category Archives: Girl Scouts News

National Cookie Link Launches February 1

This year, GSUSA is running a national campaign to encourage and support the 2021 Girl Scout Cookie Program by creating a national cookie link, or URL. Customers can enter their zip code and search the Cookie Finder to find a troop in their area that is selling cookies!

NOTE: Customers will have ONLY the options to place an order for shipped or donated when they select a troop URL through the Cookie Finder. TCMs will be responsible equally dividing the troop link cookie sales amongst the girls in the troop.

In order for troops to participate in the national campaign, the troop URL must be activated in Digital Cookie.

Once the troop URL link is activated, it will appear in the Cookie Finder on February 1.

For more detailed information and steps to activate link, check out these Digital Cookie Tip Sheets:

Troop Direct Ship Link

Troop Link Enabling Delivery

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

How to Navigate Digital Cookie Mobile App – Resources for Support

If you’re a new troop cookie manager for the 2021 Girl Scout Cookie Program or you’re new to Girl Scouts, you may not yet be familiar with Digital Cookie, an online platform for girls to sell cookies and accept debit/credit card payments when selling cookies door-to-door or at cookie booths.

There are lots of resources available to new cookie volunteers and Girl Scout families!

New Digital Cookie tip sheets have been added to the Cookie Resources page. Click on the links below to view and download.

Troop volunteers can easily send tips sheets to parents/caregivers too!

New Digital Cookie Mobile App Mini Guide and Tip Sheet

See how to navigate all the features in the Digital Cookie App, step-by-step!

DOC Mobile App – 101 Mini Guide

Mobile App – View or Approve Orders

Pro Tip: Set up your girl’s Digital Cookie storefront first, then download the app.

Additional Resources:

For Troop Cookie Managers/Cookie Helper Volunteers

Does your troop want to participate in the GSUSA National Cookie Link campaign and add the troop URL to the Cookie Finder? Customers who search the Cookie Finder will be shown the URL of a troop in their area to order shipped or donated cookies!

Troop Direct Ship Link

Want to enable your troop URL for girl delivery/booth use instead?

Troop Link Enabling Delivery

Cover the basics with these tip sheets:

Troop Leader Order Received-shipped or donated

Troop Leader Order Received-delivery_ship or donate

Troop Dashboard

For Parents/Caregivers/Girls

Does your Girl Scout still need to set up her Digital Cookie site? Check out these tips for helping her get started and customize her site.

Site registration – Girls under 13

Site Registration – Girls 13 and older

Photo – Video Upload

For Troubleshooting Log In

What to do if you didn’t get a registration email

Forgot Password or Password Reset

Unlock Account

How-To Videos:

If you missed any of the Digital Cookie training that posted after the January 17 launch date, you can click on a link below and go directly to the video!

Digital Cookie 101 video – for Parents/Caregivers and TCMs

YouTube: https://youtu.be/2Wd_Ga0Dg4U

Navigating Digital Cookie – For Troop Cookie Volunteers (TCMs and helpers) – Recorded live webinar

YouTube: https://youtu.be/WUaN83-yRPc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/girlscoutsofcolorado/videos/457511312293275/

Navigating Digital Cookie – For Parents/Caregivers

YouTube: https://youtu.be/q2V1ib7097U

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/girlscoutsofcolorado/videos/907963476640794/

Have questions or need assistance? Contact Girl Scouts of Colorado customer care at inquiry@gscolorado.org or call (877)-404-5708.

Look for more updates to come on the GSCO Blog and website, and Facebook page.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Listen now – Meet an Expert: Women in Robotics with Arrow Electronics

Girl Scouts of Colorado extends big thanks to Victoria Bohannon-Pea, a project manager at Arrow Electronics and Angelica Roman, a marketing manager at deepwatch, for participating in our Meet an Expert program on January 13, 2021. More than 80 Girl Scouts of all ages participated in the webinar live to learn about working in the robotics industry. You can now watch and listen to this webinar on the GSCO YouTube channel. Don’t forget to check out our whole Meet an Expert playlist while you’re there!

In addition to speaking with the girls about their careers, Victoria and Anjelica presented their work on a robotic dragon! Arrow Electronics is developing a robotic dragon to fulfill the wish of a young girl as part of the Make a Wish program. They showed girls videos and photos from the development of the dragon and explained how they’ve been building it to be as lifelike as possible. The dragon will be completed and delivered to its owner in spring 2021.

After learning all about the dragon, Girl Scouts had an opportunity to ask Victoria and Angelica questions life. The girls asked about their education and the other projects they get to work on. We learned that the dragon responds to touch, can walk around, and doesn’t like kale! Victoria’s last piece of advice for any girls interested in a career in robotics is to learn coding. Luckily, there are Coding for Good badges for every Girl Scout level!

Girl Scouts who participated in the live session or listen to the recording can purchase the “Meet an Expert” patch online: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/about-girl-scouts/gsco-shop.html

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Kaitlyn Ketchell, Monument, “Eating Disorder Education”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

The main issue I tackled in my project was lack of education and awareness about eating disorders; namely, warning signs and seeking treatment, as well as general education about eating disorders. The old curriculum used in the health classes at my high school didn’t provide the right kind of education about eating disorders that would allow students to better understand and handle eating disorders, so I created a new curriculum for the middle and high schools in my district. I also created informational pamphlets about eating disorders, which I distributed to local medical establishments (clinics, pharmacies, etc.) and some of the schools in my district.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

In order to measure the impact of my project, I created two surveys with questions about eating disorders: one for students to take before watching my presentation on eating disorders, and one for students to take after watching my presentation on eating disorders. Then (with the help of a friend), I analyzed the results and found that scores were much improved on the post-survey.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable through the continued use of my eating disorder lessons by the high school health teachers. Additionally, my lessons are available for free on the Teachers Pay Teachers website and can be used by anyone.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global/national connection is through the Teachers Pay Teachers website, making my lessons available to anyone for free (teachers, home-schoolers, and more) to use any time.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I’m more resilient than I previously thought. When COVID-19 shut down the schools in my district, I thought that would be the death of my project. However, I worked with the members of my team and was able to record myself teaching my lessons, which the health teachers were able to use in their virtual classes.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has increased my confidence, my leadership skills, and my ability to navigate bureaucracies. This has taught me that I am capable of persevering through whatever challenges I may face in the future. When I face roadblocks in the future, I will draw upon the things I learned from my Gold Award project to persevere through them.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is Girl Scouts’ highest achievement. Earning this was important to me as a Girl Scout because I set the goal early on and was able to achieve it. I first learned about the Gold Award when my troop leader introduced us to the Bronze Award. Earning the Bronze and Silver Awards inspired me to continue toward my goal of earning Gold.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me become an innovator because I had to come up with new ideas and unique solutions to new problems (like COVID-19 shutting down our schools).

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Safiya Dhunna, Aurora, “The E-Waste Recycling Exposé”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

The E-Recycling Exposé addresses the lack of education for fourth and fifth graders on the importance of e-recycling. Many people have heard of paper, plastic, or glass recycling. But, electronics, as common as they are in our society, are not frequently recycled. They can be harmful to our environment, damaging our water and land with dangerous metals. It struck me as surprising when I found out that only 20% of our electronics are recycled, leaving the rest to be put into the trash and landfills, ultimately polluting our Earth. This fact grew even more shocking to me when I found that paper and plastic products, which are just as important as technology, are recycled more than twice as much as electronics. In fact, in 2017, 46.9% of paper products had been recycled in the United States (epa.gov). These facts spurred me to take action with my Gold Award Project, knowing I could make a difference.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My audience learned to answer the following questions:

  • What percentage of electronics are currently recycled?
  • Where can you drop off an electronic to recycle?
  • What is the first step in recycling an electronic
  • What type of electronic cannot be recycled?
  • What is the most commonly recycled electronic?
  • What is the most common metal that comes out of recycled electronics?
  • If I recycle a million cell phones, how many pounds of copper will be retrieved?
  • Is it ILLEGAL to put electronics in the landfill in Colorado?
  • What country produces the most electronic waste?
  • What country produces the least electronic waste?

My audience also learned the full cycle of recycling an electron. From taking is to be recycled to having the recycled  electronics be made into new technology.

I measured my impact by creating a quiz game, also known as a Kahoot, as well as a pre and post curriculum survey. These three things all had measurable reports to give me the data in my project.

My impact was measured in the beginning,middle and end of my Gold Award, the E-Recycling Exposé. The pre survey was given before any information. The Kahoot was given while I was teaching the students, and the post survey was given at the end. All three things measured how much the students learned throughout the entire project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have a signed Letter of Commitment from Fox Elementary signed by the fourth grade team/teacher, Ms. Sevy.  In this Letter of Commitment, it states that my e-recycling curriculum will be integrated into the STEM program at the elementary schools that I presented at. This is so that kids in the future years will continue to learn about the important topic of e-recycling. The teachers I talked to were especially interested in using my informational video and my Kahoot game in the future.

With Kyklos, they work on teaching local schools and businesses about environmental sustainability, in Santiago, Chile. They are also partnered with BlueStar Recyclers to learn more about E-recycling. Kyklos is planning to use parts of my curriculum to further their material in teaching about E-recycling.  (https://create.kahoot.it/share/tech-recycling/76a37d2e-a7f3-4ebc-beb8-e14086e160a2).

All the teachers had access to my materials when I shared them through Google Drive or email. Both of these platforms worked well across the board. The video I created was embedded in the PowerPoint I created, and the captions are on that video as well. So, all the materials needed to teach my curriculum are easily accessible. My tools did a really great job of educating the kids while keeping them excited about learning as well.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The E-Waste Recycling Exposé’s global link was through a company called Kyklos. The main company I worked with, BlueStar Recyclers works with Kyklos in Santiago, Chile. This company creates programs based on environmental sustainability for local schools and businesses in Santiago, Chile. The informational video I created, I put Spanish captions on it and sent it to Kyklos to use for part of their program. I contacted Kyklos, their co-founder Sebastián Herceg, twice during my Gold Award process. I was supposed to meet their founder in-person since they partner with  a company that I worked with in Denver (BlueStar Recyclers) but unfortunately this was right when COVID-19 hit so it was unable to happen. I did, however, email back and forth with them when I had created my video. When I had first sent my video to Kyklos, their response was great. “Tremendo!” They said.  It made me happy to know that this of course translates to tremendous. Sebastian had a couple of editing marks for me which I then fixed. I also added Spanish captions onto the video which was not easy. These captions can be viewed by clicking the “cc” button on my video which is linked above. I had to translate my video and then make permanent captions on the video which was on my private Youtube channel. I made these changes and then I sent the video on its way to Chile.

Later on, in my E-Recycling Exposé experience, I finished the other parts of my curriculum. After this step, I sent my second email to Kyklos. I asked them if they wanted the rest of my curriculum since they already had my educational video. Their co-founder emailed back and said that I should send it over and that they would work on getting it translated into Spanish. I was extremely happy when this happened. I have a bilingual Gold Award. In two different parts of the globe. Although the curriculum here in Colorado and in Chile, it serves the same purpose. Kyklos educates a lot of local schools about recycling so I am hoping that it will help as many boys and girls there learn about E-recycling.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am good at teaching elementary school kids and teaching in general because my project was curriculum-based and involved a lot of teaching. I never really taught before this.  I had presented projects and PowerPoints, but it was different for me to have to pioneer an elementary school curriculum and showcase it to kids who had never seen it before. I really got into the whole teaching aspect. I was able to talk to the kids and then you know, stop asking questions and discuss things with them that either they were confused about or simply curious about. I even had one of the teachers whose class you are presenting to comment to me that she wanted me to come back and teach her other class because I was such a good teacher. This was something that really surprised me because I had never taught before. I enjoyed teaching and getting to know the students. Doing this part of my Gold Award made me think that I could use the skill in the future.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think earning my Gold Award will impact me in the future because of the skills it has given me. I had gained a lot of confidence in myself as a leader, which is a great way to go into college next year, in my opinion. I also have learned how to create a support system, and be creative in ways I never thought I would learn how to do. These are all skills I can use in the future. Doing this project has allowed me to prepare myself for any future career I might be interested in. I know that with these skills I can handle any workload or challenge that comes my way.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel like the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it allowed me to use all my skills I have learned for one big project. I was able to have something to wrap up my ten years as a Girl Scout and that feeling was incredible.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become a G.I.R.L. in a lot of ways but the letter that defines me the most is G, go-getter. I hit a lot of walls when I was initially starting my project and it took me a while to find an idea. But I did not give up, I was determined to do my Gold Award. Throughout the project journey, there were a lot of times when it got hard or challenging. I learned to take a break and then regain my motivation. This helped me gain passion and confidence while doing my Gold Award, and through that I learned how to be innovative by creating my own curriculum, a risk-taker by working with companies I had never worked with before and of course, a leader.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Celebrate World Thinking Day: Meet a Girl Guide from Bangladesh

Did you know that there are ten million Girl Scouts and Girl Guides who represent 150 countries all over the world?

In celebration of World Thinking Day 2021, Girl Scouts of all ages are invited to a special “Meet an Expert” session on Monday, February 22 at 5 p.m. to meet a Girl Guide from Bangladesh! Register now: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/meet_an_expert_girl_guide_from_bangladesh_webinar_02_22_2021

We ask that girls submit questions for our guest in advance using the registration form. Our guest will tell girls all about life in Bangladesh, what she does as a Girl Guide, and then answer questions from Girl Scouts.

When registering you are telling us you will be logging in LIVE! Our guest will prepare based on registration numbers, so please make sure you log in on time. The program will be recorded and posted to the GSCO YouTube channel. Do not register if you plan to watch the recording.

We will use Zoom to host this program. All information on how to join online or via phone will be emailed out to registrants the day before the program. Each individual participant should be registered so we can track participation. Please do not share the information on how to join with others who have not registered.

Registration will close February 18.

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Girl Scout Day of Service

Submitted by Eleanor T., Girl Scout Brownie, Troop 77918

Northern & Northeastern

Longmont

For Day of Service, I picked up trash. My mom and I went to Roosevelt Park in Longmont and we walked around the whole park and picked up trash with our grabbers. We got more than two pounds of trash! I think it’s important to pick up trash because it helps our community.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Silver Award Project: Joyful Journeys Garden

Submitted by Susanne Wallach

Metro Denver

Northglenn/ Thornton/ Westminster

In January 2020, Julia, Katie, Meera, and Victoria from Troop 63787 started their Silver Award project with goals to build a community garden and incorporate recycled objects. Their vision was to provide access to free, fresh produce for everyone, and to have the garden be a welcoming, safe space for all to enjoy. The process of starting a community garden from scratch would have been a daunting project on its own so they were glad they were able to partner with Joyful Journeys to refurbish their existing community garden at the Northglenn Christian Church.

However, the pandemic struck just as they were about to transition from the planning to the implementation phase. The girls were able to overcome this unexpected challenge and were still able to persevere to create a beautiful, thriving garden. They learned to collaborate with one another via Zoom and develop a plan that they could each be a part of and execute while socially distanced. They also faced an additional challenge of a shorter growing season this year (a late start due to the stay-at-home order and an early deep freeze in September). Despite this pitfall, they still managed to donate 400 pounds of produce which benefited the Northglenn Christian Church food bank, Joyful Journeys, and local families.

With donations received from Lowe’s and Pioneer in Northglenn, the girls made some functional and aesthetic improvements to the garden. In addition, the girls worked independently to make additions to the garden using recycled objects. These include signs and a vertical planter built from recycled pallet wood and beautiful garden theme art made from plastic recyclables. The girls also documented all the things they learned about gardening throughout this project and prepared on-site instructions for volunteers and a comprehensive handbook provided to Joyful Journeys for future reference.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.

Smart Cookie: January 25, 2021

Welcome to the 2021 Girl Scout Cookie Program!

Thanks to our amazing volunteers, we are ready to launch on Sunday, January 31.

This Smart Cookie email is delivered to all troop cookie managers each week during the program. Our goal is to provide you with quick and easy tips and reminders to guide you through the Girl Scout Cookie Program. The Girl Scout Cookie Program is powered by girls – but they couldn’t do it without you! If you know someone who should have received this but didn’t please send them this link to be added to the list. (Also, if you prefer not to receive this weekly email, use the link to let us know to remove you from the list.)

Saturday, January 30 is Marin Cookie Delivery Day

Troops pick up their initial orders of cookie inventory from sites around the state. Please make sure you have enough space in your vehicle to pick up your order. Check the graphic on page 24 of the Troop Cookie Manager Guide to see how many cases of cookies your vehicle can hold. Also, don’t forget you’ll need to wear a face covering, stay in your vehicle, and have completed a COVID pre-screen before you arrive to pick up cookies.

Troops without an ACH on file will not be allowed to pick up cookies. A new ACH must be completed each year.

Get Prepped for Delivery Day

Troop cookie managers – look for a short, just-in-time video to post to the GSCO Facebook page and YouTube channel this week. You can share it with all the delivery day, cookie pick up volunteers in your troop too!

Go Day is Sunday, January 31

New this year – electronic permission forms! Parents/caregivers can complete the form online and request that a copy of the form is emailed to the troop cookie manager!  Make sure you have signed permission forms for all the girls in your troop before you distribute cookie inventory to families. Be sure to use receipts for all cookie transactions.

If your girls have planned My Sales booth sites, make sure they’ve been approved by the service unit cookie manager at least 48 hours prior to the booth. Planning a drive-thru booth or virtual booth? Check out the new Booth Guideand the mini guides on the GSCO Cookie Resources page!

Cookie Customer Questions

While your girls and their families are out and about selling Girl Scout Cookies, they get asked about Girl Scouts and might even meet someone who wants to become a Girl Scout. Let’s show all our cookie customers how the world’s largest girl-led entrepreneurial program prepares girls to lead, learn, and succeed all while making it possible for them to embark on amazing adventures, form a lifetime of memories, and make the world a better place. Share this two-sided sheet with girls and families for tips on how to answer, “Why Girl Scouts” like a pro! Troop volunteers can also take a look at this Booth Essentials sheetto prepare for scenarios that sometimes come up while selling cookies.

Booth Selection Dates

Due to the delays in confirming some council locations, we have made the decision to move the dates of the council booth selection rounds.

Booth selection rounds are open in eBudde from 6 – 11:59 p.m. (MST) on the dates listed below. Booths must be selected during time slots for each round. They cannot be added by council to a troops’ booth tally between rounds.

  • Thursday, January 28– Booth Round 1 – each troop will receive one booth selection.
  • Friday, January 29 – Booth Round 2 – each troop will receive two booth selections.
  • Monday, February 1 – Booth Round 3 – each troop will have a limit of up to ten booth selections in total.
  • Monday, February 8 – Booth Round 4 – each troop will have a limit of up to 20 booth selections, in addition to booths already selected.

Read More on the GSCO Blog

Posting Digital Cookie Link in Public Locations

Due to the extraordinary circumstances surrounding the 2021 Girl Scout Cookie Program, Girl Scouts of the USA has revised its guidance around the posting of individual Digital Cookie urls in public locations. Girl Scouts may share their Digital Cookie url on public sites, but they cannot post to sales sites such as Craigslist, Facebook Marketplace, or eBay. Caregivers should be involved in all decisions about where to post and to whom cookies can be delivered and follow all safety guidelines.

Digital Cookie- Girl Delivery

New this year! Girl Scouts started setting-up their Digital Cookie sites when it opened on January 17. Lots of great cookie entrepreneur videos were uploaded as girls customized their sites and reached out to customers – kicking off their cookie season with lots of enthusiasm!

Girls can start delivering cookie orders as soon as January 31 when they have cookies in-hand.

Want to share contactless cookie delivery tips with the girls in your troop? Send Girl Scout families the No Contact Deliveries Tip Sheet.
Girl can also earn a free, custom Porch Pixie patch after they make their first delivery! To get the patch, they need to complete the form on January 31 or after.

National Cookie Link Launches February 1

This year GSUSA is running a national campaign to encourage and support the 2021 cookie program by creating a national cookie link, or URL. Customers can enter their zip code and search the Cookie Finder to find a troop in their area that is selling cookies!

NOTE: Customers will have ONLY the options to place an order for shipped or donated when they select a troop URL. TCMs will be responsible for equally dividing the troop link cookie sales amongst the girls in the troop.

TCMs can activate their troop URL, direct ship/donate link in Digital Cookie. Once the troop URL link is activated, it will appear in the Cookie Finder on February 1.

For more detailed information and steps to activate link, check out these Digital Cookie Tip Sheets:

Troop Direct Ship Link

Troop Link Enabling Delivery

Cookie Cupboards Open February 4

Cupboards across the state will begin opening on Thursday, February 4. Days and hours of operation for each cupboard may vary due to the type of cupboard and location. Check eBudde for the latest information.

Place all orders to pick up from a cupboard through the Transactions tab in eBudde, 72 hours prior to your intended pickup time.

Earn Custom Patches During the 2021 Cookie Program

Colorado Girl Scouts who host a virtual cookie booth on Super Bowl weekend, February 6-7 will receive a FREE Virtual Cookie Booth patch if they complete the online form no later than Tuesday, February 9, 2021. This form will not open until February 6. Learn more about hosting a virtual booth by downloading the Virtual Cookie Booth Guide on the GSCO Cookie Resources page.

Girl Scouts can also earn a FREE Pandemic Perseverance patch by doing the following:

  • Take a photo showcasing how you’re persevering to reach your cookie goal. This can be a photo of you working on your Digital Cookie website, hosting a virtual cookie booth, dropping off cookies on a friend or family member’s doorstep, etc.
  • Upload your photo(s) and story using the Share Your Stories form on the GSCO Blog. The best photos and stories will be shared on the GSCO Blog and social media networks.
  • Complete the Pandemic Perseverance patch form no later than Tuesday, March 9, 2021.
  • You can also share your photo on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Be sure to tag Girl Scouts of Colorado. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo and #GirlScoutCookies.

*These  patches are for Colorado Girl Scouts only.

Learn More

Cookie Program Proceeds

Please remember troop members share in the proceeds from a successful product program; proceeds aren’t distributed to individual girl members. Girls are eligible for rewards and Cookie Credits that they put toward council-sponsored camps, programs, and items in the Girl Scouts of Colorado Shop.

Graphic Design 101

Submitted by Arya Thomson

Pikes Peak

Fountain

Arya used her Brownie Computer Expert badge skills to design a flyer to pass out to her classmates and teacher. Now, they can order on her digital site and receive some contactless cookie love. Arya used Adobe Spark and a bank of graphics from GSCO to create a design that was all her own. She even added a “love yourself” message on the bottom.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She was at the can send in her story here.