Category Archives: Girl Scout News

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Rebecca Kopacz, Colorado Springs, “I am…”

Rebecca Kopacz

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

As young girls mature into teens, they are very vulnerable to the impacts of social media, culture views, TV, magazines, and peers. Elementary and middle school aged girls can become more susceptible to the impact of negative views on a girl’s unique qualities. Therefore, early introduction to positive self-worth is crucial. For my Girl Scout Gold Award, I hosted a six-week weekly workshop to strengthen positive body image in 5th and 6th grade girls. During this workshop, I worked to prevent a lowered self-esteem and teach girls that they can be accepted for who they are.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Each week had an individual theme pertaining to the overall topic of positive self-esteem. Throughout the weeks, I noticed the girls became a lot more comfortable speaking their mind. I noticed a major change in the girls, during the fourth week, “Counter Negative Media Messages.” The girls each had their own opinion and were not afraid to share it.

Each week, I had the girls fill out a journal with questions pertaining to the weekly topic. During the first week, I asked the question, “What words best describe you.” Their responses weren’t very deep and usually consisted of words like, “funny,” “nice,” or “lazy.” During the sixth week, I asked the same question and their responses were, “strong,” “fierce,” and “beautiful.” The change in the girls and how they viewed themselves was a major difference between the six weeks and I feel that I have contributed to their positive growth.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

The workshops were attended by my project adviser and also by the guidance counselor from the elementary school where I held the workshops. In the future, the guidance counselor plans to host the workshops as an after school club. In this way the project will be sustained in my local community. I wrote a manual that included research, snack ideas, instructions for introducing the topics, activities/games, and journal pages for each workshop. By doing this, other people will be able to recreate the workshops and make a difference in their community.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I created a website for national and global exposure for my project. It can be accessed at: iamgoldaward.com. On this website, I wrote about my project and the impact it made on my community. I also emailed three elementary school principals, assistant principals, and counselors in two other districts regarding my project. I gave then all a manual and the information about my club and got responses saying they would keep the information in hopes of expanding the club.

What did you learn about yourself?

I was able to research, plan, and execute a project that I feel very passionate about. I gained more knowledge on the subject of positive self-esteem and body image. I developed decision making and people skills by coordinating the workshops with girls, parents, my project adviser, and school officials. I feel that through this project I learned that I am capable of setting achievable goals and working toward reaching them.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I learned that I am capable of setting and reaching goals and that I am able to lead a large project. I feel that these new skills will be beneficial in college as well as future careers. Low self-image can lead to very serious issues; therefore, we should be encouraging the young girls in our world. Through what I learned in this project, I will continue to advocate on the importance of positive self-esteem.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have learned so much through this project, not only about the importance of positive self-worth, but about my capabilities as a young member of the community. I am proud of my accomplishments and feel that my project has and will continue to make a difference. I designed my project on a cause I have learned about through Girl Scouts and have utilized the skills I learned along the way. This project has given me the confidence to be a positive young adult who leads by example and I will continue to strive to be a positive role model like the Girl Scouts before me.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships 2017

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Submitted by Kelly Vogtner

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

All Girl Scouts are invited to attend the ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships 2017, April 7 – 8, at the Broadmoor World Arena in Colorado Springs.

This event will feature 24 teams of 16 women competing in synchronized figure skating, from around the world. It is sanctioned by the International Skating Union, and hosted by U.S. Figure Skating. The United States hosts it only every 3-4 years.

The Opening Ceremony will begin at 5:30 p.m., Friday, April 7, immediately followed by the Short Program Competition. Denver Synchronicity, pre-juvenile team, a local team of 15 girls, ages 7-13, from the Denver FSC will be performing in the Opening Ceremony.

The Free Skate / Championship event will be on Saturday, April 8, 2017, at 5:45 p.m., where the World Champion is crowned.

Team USA 1, the Haydenettes, from Boston, are the reigning World Bronze Medalists. Two athletes on this team grew up training in the Denver area.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Angela Smith, Colorado Springs, “Growing Bees!”

Angela Smith

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

I implemented an educational program about bees at a local environmental center, The Catamount Institute. I wanted to address the problems facing bee populations, so I built a beehive and planted a garden to provide a good habitat for one hive of bees. I also wanted to use it to get others to care about bees as well, so I had children get involved in the painting of the beehive and planting the garden. I then created a six part curriculum to be used in conjunction with the beehive and gardens that will be carried out by the Catamount institute on field trips and summer camps.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

After running the curriculum, one child had gone from thinking bees were really scary to really liking them. The Catamount Institute will continue running this curriculum, and the impact can be measured by how many children go through this program.

How  is your project sustainable? How  will  your  project  continue to impact after your  involvement? 

The Catamount Institute gives regular field trips as well as camps over the summer. They have been given a full guide to the curriculum and plan to use it moving forward for their field trips. Additionally, for everything I have done for the project, I typed up a manual- how to build the beehive, how to plant a bee-friendly wildflower garden, how to winterize the beehive, and details on the curriculum. This manual was provided to the Catamount Institute and sent to other wildlife centers to encourage them to set up a similar program.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I reached out to other environmental centers with my curriculum. The three wildlife centers I chose were the Cooper Center, Long Branch Environmental Education Center, and Stillman Nature Center. The information I sent to these nature centers will also be available online, for anybody who is looking for beehive curriculum related things to find and use. Additionally, I have contacted a local, some state, and a national gardening club and provided them with my bee-friendly garden coloring sheet and flyer and asked them to help distribute them throughout their members.

What did you learn about yourself?

While I have always considered myself a natural leader, I do believe that this project has pushed those skills even further as I have now had the experience of training adults to carry out a project of my design, as opposed to working with peers or simply working with adults as opposed to training them. While I have always been a confident person, in this project I was initially shy about asking people to do things for me, but as I carried out events or stages of my project I became more comfortable as a leader.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Before doing this project, I could never have imagined that I could achieve something this big and actually make it matter. Now, I will go into life more confident in my ability to effect change. Additionally, I think that this was a really amazing opportunity to show potential employers that I am a capable leader who can be creative and come up with unique solutions to problems.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I was not very involved in Girl Scouts for a lot of high school, but after I realized that I wanted to do a project related to bees, I realized how great a resource being a Girl Scout could be if you wanted to make a change. In all of my career as a Girl Scout, I don’t think I have ever been more proud or happy to be a Girl Scout, and I think that is because no other aspect of Girl Scouting had required as much involvement as this did.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Troop 720 helps at local food bank

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Some of the girls from Troop 720 spent two and a half hours helping out at a local food bank. We bagged up 1,500 pounds of chocolate in that time for low-resource families. Giving back and service work are so important and a big part of what we do. All the girls love the opportunity to give back to others.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scouts receive Youth Heroes award from Red Cross

Congratulations to Senior Girl Scouts Haley Bolen of Denver and Annabelle Schaeffer of Lakewood! They received the Youth Heroes award from the American Red Cross Mile High Area. Haley and Annabelle were among seven local heroes recognized at the organization’s 2017 Heroes Soiree event on March 10. The Heroes Soiree is an annual event to celebrate the community and honor local heroes and first responders.

During a camping trip at Sky High Ranch in Woodland Park, Haley used skills which she learned during her week-long Red Cross babysitting course previously this year, to recognize the signs of a stroke and inform the parent volunteers at the camp what the emergency was. Haley recited the FAST rules to the parents and told them the Girl Scout leader was having a stroke. Haley’s quick thinking and fast action helped to save a life that day. Once the EMTs arrived, Haley assisted in giving information of symptoms to the medics. Annabelle was also instrumental in assisting Haley, and gave the emergency information needed to notify the leaders’ family of her condition and the hospital she was being taken to. These young ladies showed great lifesaving skills by keeping everyone calm, not panicking, and knowing what to do in an emergency.

Photos from the 2017 event can be found here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/redcrossmilehighchapter/albums/72157676703776674

 

 

Girl Scout University at DU

Submitted by Christina Bartholomew, cbarth8432@gmail.com

Metro Denver

Denver

Girl Scout University is a day-long event on Saturday, April 15, 2017 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. on the University of Denver campus to help Girl Scouts earn badges. Alpha Phi Omega (a national service fraternity) at DU will teaching two 2-hour sessions offering the following badges:

Cadettes: First-Aid, Budgeting, Finding Common Ground, Comic Artists, and Netiquette

Juniors: First-Aid, Drawing, Digital Photographer, Jewelry, Entertainment Technology, and Scribe

Brownies: First-Aid, Dancer, My Best Self, Home Scientist, Making Games, and Inventor

Girl Scouts can choose one badge to work on in the morning session and another badge in the afternoon session.

Cost: $10/Girl Scout for both morning and afternoon sessions

$5/Girl Scout for one session (morning or afternoon)

Registration: Please contact cbarth8432@gmail.com to sign-up. Registration deadline is April 8, 2017.

Girl Scouts staying for both sessions should bring a sack lunch and water bottle.

All instruction will be provided by volunteers. Girl Scout volunteers and parents will be needed to maintain safety ratios. A space will be available for parents to hang out during the event if needed.

Questions? Email Christina Bartholomew at cbarth8432@gmail.com.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Lindsay Iannone, Castle Rock, “Revitalization and Organization of the Faith Lutheran Church Library”

 

Lindsay Iannone

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I addressed the library functionality at Faith Lutheran Church (FLC) and the shortage of public computer availability in the city of Castle Rock. I removed unwanted books, received new donations, and purchased books and DVDs. In addition, I created an online cataloging/organization system for the library. I also added a public computer that church members, visitors at the church waiting on financial aid, and anyone in the community can use as a resource.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The biggest example of the project’s impact on the community is the overall turnaround of the library. The library is completely organized and accessible to all members and visitors of the church and anyone in the community. Multiple members and staff of the FLC commented on how grateful they were that I completed this project and how they will be able to use the space in the future. I also reached out to different community organizations to educate them about the new computer and book resources so that they could refer their clients to the church as well.

Howis your project sustainable?Howwillyourprojectcontinue to impact after yourinvolvement?

A group within FLC will be continuing the maintenance of the library for years to come. I wrote a guide about how to keep the library organized, how the cataloging system works, and how the computer should be kept up to date, so that the group has all of the details and expectations laid out clearly. This will keep the library organized, accessible, modern, and interesting for the congregation and community to use.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global link was with the Lutheran Church of South Sudan (LCSS). The LCSS is building the Trinity Lutheran Seminary in Gambella, Ethiopia to train local and regional pastors. One of their most important buildings will be, of course, a library. However, the LCSS does not have the funds to buy thousands of resources for their seminary library. We donated 223 books, VHS, and Bibles that were not being used in the FLC library to the LCSS seminary. These books will help them reach their goal of 10,000 copies, and allow them to train even more pastors in the region.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned so many valuable things from doing this project! The most obvious skills I have developed are communication skills. Additionally, I learned more about multi-tasking, organization, and adult-life skills. I also greatly expanded my leadership experience and skills through this project, and discovered that I actually really enjoy leading teams and individuals.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has set me on a road to success. With all the skills I’ve learned, I feel very prepared to enter college and the adult world as a strong and contributing member of society. The Gold Award has also given me an advantage in select college and scholarship programs, which will help advance my knowledge and fund my education.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts since kindergarten, so earning my Gold Award felt like the greatest culmination to my Girl Scout journey. It was a way to combine all of the skills I had learned in Girl Scouts over the years into one great project that could serve the community. There is not better way to honor and celebrate your time as a Girl Scout than through the Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Molly McPherson, Boulder, “Saving the World One Bottle at a Time”

 

Molly McPherson

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Bottled water has horrific environmental and health effects, and costs an absurd amount of money for buying water, a liquid that is most often close to free.  An average American uses 167 plastic non-reusable water bottles in one year, however, by being proactive we can reduce our impact on our environment including the air, and oceans specifically.  My role in this issue, was promoting the use of reusable water bottles, as well as uncovering the truth of the harmful effects of bottled water.  I created a 25 minute presentation on the subject that I had researched then I presented in 12 different places, including elementary, middle, and high school classes, as well as clubs, and a business.  I also created a website (www.savingtheworldonebottleatatime.com) and Facebook page. I informed at least 300 people about plastic water bottle pollution, and I gave out stickers with my website domain to people to spread the word about my project.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The most rewarding aspect of my project is that I have had numerous people come up to me and tell me that they just bought a reusable water bottle and are no longer using bottled water.  I work in an ice cream shop, and little kids whom I have given my presentation to, will come in and recognize me, and their parents have told me that their kids told them about my presentation and that as a family they have been inspired to eliminate their use of plastic water bottles.  The little successes of people telling me that they are thinking about their use of plastic and being conscious of what they are adding the environment shows that I have truly made an impact in people’s lives.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have shared my presentation with over 300 people, and given them stickers with my website address.  People will always be able to view my website, and learn about the issue.  I will also be coming out with a short movie soon that I will share.  In addition, I have several presentations scheduled for the future, so I will continue to reach new audiences.

One of my presentations was for my school’s garden club in which I am involved.  They have agreed to continue my presentation for years after my involvement in the club.  I have shared my presentation with them and my note cards for each slide with all the information so that they will be able to continue the presentation.  In this club, we typically grow a garden, then harvest our crops in the summer, however in the winter we always try to learn more about the subject, and work to become more eco-friendly, and educated on the subject.  So this is something that they can learn about every year as new members join.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have given my website and Facebook page information to friends and family across the United States, so they can research and also become educated on the subject.  I have involved many of my friends and family members to be a part in sharing my project, so it has been able to reach as far as cousins in England, as well as family in Wisconsin, Florida, Chicago, and California.  My website includes information on all the effects that I teach in my presentation, so anybody can easily learn about the subject.  Therefore, it is accessible to anyone who wants to learn more.

What did you learn about yourself?

I’ve learned that presenting in front of people is not as easy as it looks.  I found that I got really nervous when I started talking in front of people even just family, which is where I practiced first.  I practiced the presentation at least 20 times before I took it to a classroom, and finally my sentences started flowing better and I was able to form coherent sentences without using unnecessary filler words.

For the first three presentations I was very nervous, but by practicing in between them, asking people for constructive criticism, and filming myself, I improved in a short amount of time.  After about five presentations, I no longer got nervous, I felt prepared and confident, and I really felt comfortable. I have gotten really great at public speaking, and learned that practice is really important in projects like these.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Next year, I will be studying education at Fort Lewis College, because I want to become a middle school social studies teacher. Now when I have presentations, I feel that I am really great at leading the classrooms.  I have learned how to keep a classroom engaged in the subject I’m teaching, and how to answer questions that students have in a positive way to not steer away from the subject.  These presentations have taught me leadership and given me a taste of what it’s like to speak in front of classrooms and teach my own lesson, similar to what I will be doing when I’m a teacher.

In addition, I will be continuing with the subject of bottled water pollution.  I am currently in the process of making a movie about the subject, then planning on sharing it with my Facebook page, and website, where I hope it will reach many more people.  I also have scheduled presentations for the upcoming months, so just because I have completed my Gold Award, does not mean that I have finished making an impact with this project.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

This project has inspired me to know that I really can make a difference in the world!  I have learned that if you have a true passion for something, you can make a change!  Knowing that even just one person listened to my ideas, and bought a reusable water bottle, and wants my sticker to put on it, is the best feeling in the world.  Knowing that I can be the one to get someone to choose to not use bottled water at a party, or school, or any sort of event, and instead bring their reusable water bottle around, shows that I am limiting the amount of bottled water being used, even if it’s just one person.  I feel the momentum that I have with this project, and I do not plan on stopping because I know I can make a larger impact! I have learned that change can start as small as you want it to be, but by being passionate, positive and hopeful, that change can turn into anything you want it to be!

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Day of Service: Fireside Productions & GSCO Outreach

Below is a great video from Fireside Productions, who volunteered with one of our Girl Scout Outreach Brownie troops in Jefferson County. Volunteers helped the girls with activities from the Brownie Journey, Wonders of Water.

Thank you to Amelia Jones for working with Fireside Production staff and coordinating the volunteer activity!

Fireside Productions also does video work for our GSCO Women of Distinction events. The company’s culture has a large focus on service and their team does a quarterly service project as a team. We are honored their team choose GSCO’s Outreach Program for this first quarter of 2017!

 To access the video, click this link –   http://firesideproduction.com/fireside-day-service/ . Enjoy!

Outdoor Skills Day Camp

Submitted by Molly M.

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

Are you looking for outdoor fun and adventure? You are in luck! Senior Girl Scout Troop 7 is running outdoor skills days.

Get ready for camping fun! The Girl Scout Outdoor Skills day camps on April 22, 2017 (Thornton-regular) and April 29, 2017 (Boulder-advanced) prepare girls for camping and outdoors. Each girl will earn an outdoor skills patch, in addition to learning:

  1.  Knife craft and safety
  2. Compass use
  3. Outdoor cooking
  4. Fire building
  5.  Campsite Set-up
  6. Tent pitching
  7. Emergency first-aid and preparation

Regular Camp: April 22 (Thornton)

Who: 1st Graders and up. No experience necessary

When: 9:30 a.m. — 3:30 p.m.

Price: 1 Girl – $17 includes hot lunch and Outdoor
Skills patch

Additional adults: $5/day

Advanced Camp: April 29 (Boulder)

Who: 4th Graders and up. Must have prior camping
experience

When: 9:30 a.m. — 3:30 p.m.

Price: 1 Girl – $18 includes hot lunch and Outdoor
Skills patch

Additional adults: $5/day

Register early. A sell-out is expected.

Advanced Payment Required

Website link to register both scouts and adults:
https://sites.google.com/site/gsoutdoorskillsdayscolorado/

Contact Senior / Ambassador Girl Scout Troop 7
at

Girlscouttroop70007@gmail.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.