Category Archives: Girl Scout News

The most fun ever: PA hours completed

40963104_brownie_elf_story_photo

Submitted by Jessica Gentilini

Mountain Communities

Eagle

Girl Scout Cadettes Hailey Gentilini and Olivia Ferzacca from Service Unit 5 (Mountain Communities) recently completed their Program Aide (PA) hours by teaching brand-new Brownie Troop 56349 the Girl Scout Promise and Law and how they relate to us as Girl Scouts. They read the Brownie story and each girl got to take a turn identifying who the Brownie in the reflection was. After the story, the girls learned the Brownie Smile song, made a SWAP, and passed the silent hand-squeeze wish around the circle before twisting around and departing from their first meeting. As Olivia and Hailey reflected on how they thought they did, which was awesome by the way, they both thought working with the Brownies was the most fun ever and can’t wait to plan and run an event for more girls!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Centennial Celebration in Grand Junction

More than 150 Girl Scouts, friends, and family gathered on Saturday, April 29, 2017 in Grand Junction to celebrate 100 years of Girl Scouting in Colorado at the third in a series of Centennial Campfire celebrations. A final celebration will be held May 21 at Meadow Mountain Ranch near Rocky Mountain National Park.

Girl Scouts participated in a “passport” full of fun activities, including archery with Cabela’s, crafts with GSCO camp directors Obi Joe and Ruddy, a scavenger hunt, and fun with sidewalk chalk. The National Park Service was on-hand to teach girls history about the Colorado National Monument, and the GSCO shop was there with all kinds of merchandise celebrating the centennial.

Each Girl Scout in attendance also had the opportunity to meet GSCO President and CEO, Stephanie A. Foote.

All Girl Scouts who attended received a free, fun patch honoring 100 years of Girl Scouting in Colorado. The first Girl Scout troop in Colorado got started in 1917 in the Colorado Springs area.

Bronze and Silver Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Grand Junction

Nearly one hundred Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on April 30, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 35 on the Western Slope and in Southwestern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last year, nine girls on the Western Slope and in Southwestern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

Shauna Clemmer, a Gold Award recipient, and current Gold Award Mentor for the Western Slope, served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked about her own journey in Girl Scouts and wished all the girls the best in their pursuit of the highest achievements in Girl Scouting.

Sandy Jackson, a First Class recipient, current Gold Award Mentor, and Professor of Anthropology, Archaeology, and Sustainable Studies at Colorado Mountain College served as the keynote speaker. She spoke about her experiences in Girl Scouting from earning her First Class (what we now call the Gold Award), recycling and planting trees, to traveling the world and visiting Our Cabaña, one of the WAGGS World Centers in Mexico.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Square dance review Flag Ceremony

40963104_img_20170424_111644

Submitted by Laura Hobden

Pueblo & Southeastern CO

Lamar

Around Lamar, square dancing is a big thing. The square dance year is culminated in a three-night review where the dancers show off what they have learned. Each year the scouting groups take turns performing the Flag Ceremony for each night. It is great to see the girls who dance join their Girl Scout sisters in the presentation of the flag. The girls did an amazing job this year and represented Girl Scouts well!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Grant available for Women’s Wilderness Summit Sisters retreat

40963104_summit_sisters

Submitted by Annie Pierce, GSCO Property and Outdoor Program Administrator

This year, Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to offer one of our adult volunteers a space at the Summit Sister’s Camp run by Women’s Wilderness. Women’s Wilderness is hosting this camp at Meadow Mountain Ranch June 4, 2017 to June 6, 2017. Women’s Wilderness’s mission is to strengthen the courage, confidence, and leadership qualities of girls and women through the challenge and support of group wilderness and community based experiences. Summit Sisters focuses on a deep nature connection, connection to your body, inspiration and calling, and competence and outdoor skills. Presentations at Summit Sisters this year will include: The Call of the Earth, Self Confidence Formula, Wildlife Tracking in the Rockies, Inner Beauty Workshop, and so much more. For more information about Summit Sisters, please visit their website at https://www.womenswilderness.org/summit-sisters/.

We will choose one adult volunteer for a free space at the Summit Sister’s Camp – a $450 value! All meals, lodging, and programming are provided. To apply for this opportunity, click on the following link and complete the questionnaire no later than May 10, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. All applicants will be contacted on May 15 after the winner of the grant has been chosen. Applicants must have a current or lifetime membership with Girl Scouts of Colorado.

The link to the application is  https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/grantforsummitsisters06042017_06062017.

 

Town scavenger hunt

Submitted by Laura Hobden

Pueblo & Southeastern CO

Lamar

To end Girl Scout Week, our service unit planned a scavenger hunt around our town. Our oldest Cadette/Senior troop plotted the points and came up with the clues to each location. At each of the locations there was an activity to do. The girls made cheer bows and DumDum flowers to give away and helped create and watched their t-shirt being made. At the end, they had ice cream at a local shop. Each group of girls had different age levels and worked together to solve the clues to their next location.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Inez Winter

6F6B0220-D7FF-4AA3-BC8D-3A34D366D275

 

 

 

 

 

 

In honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month, Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Troop Leader Inez Winter in Pagosa Springs was nominated as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community. She recently shared the following letter about why she is a GSCO volunteer.

C604DBDE-3944-4E0C-82E7-DD6E5DB6BF3F IMG_0670

I have always known that I wanted to be a Girl Scout leader. I remember being of Brownie-age and watching the kids down the street heading for their Girl Scout meeting. I don’t know why my mom didn’t let me be in Girl Scouts at that time. I told myself at a young age that if I couldn’t be a Girl Scout I would someday be a leader. I was so excited when my daughter started kindergarten and brought home the flyer to join. I went to the organizational meeting and of course, I was the first person to raise my hand to be a leader. I was able to be a leader for my oldest daughter for almost seven years and for my youngest for two years. Now, many years later, I am into my second year as a leader for my two granddaughters. We currently have 12 girls in our troop. This is the beginning of my 10th year as a Girl Scout leader. I can honestly say that being a Girl Scout leader was one of the choices that I made with my heart and a choice that I have never regretted making. I have many girls who, still to this day, tell me about how much of a difference that I have made in their lives. I am still in contact with many of “my girls.” Many of them are mothers themselves now and it always puts a smile on my face when we talk about the “old days,” going to Rancho Girl Scout Camp, camping at the Sand Dunes, Mesa Verde, and so many other places that we went to. We always made memories that will truly last a lifetime. If you have an extra couple of hours a week, we’d love to have you join us as an assistant leader or better yet start your own troop as a leader.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

 

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Embassy Suites by Hilton in Loveland on April 23, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Before the celebration, Stephanie Foote presented Gold Award recipient and 2017 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni with an engraved silver medallion from The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma, from Arvada and senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, was named one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. This is a nationwide program honoring young people for outstanding acts of volunteerism. As a State Honoree, Emma will receive $1,000, the medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip in early May to Washington, D.C. She will join top honorees from other states and the District of Columbia for four days of national recognition events. During the trip, 10 students will be named America’s top youth volunteers of 2017.

 

Record-breaking food drive in Berthoud

40963104_ronnie 40962780_jen-fooddrive

Submitted by Jen Rotar

Northern & Northeastern CO

Berthoud

Scouting for Food in Berthoud brings together Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts to collect donations for the House of Neighborly Service. On April 1, 2017, the Scouts exceeded all previous records, raising a total of 6,292.13 pounds of food and other donations for the community. Approximately 40 Girl Scouts, along with their leaders and parent volunteers, helped with promotion, collection, and sorting donations.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Bronze and Silver Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Pueblo

Nearly one hundred Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Center for American Values in Pueblo on April 21, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 24 in Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last two years, 18 girls across Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.