Category Archives: Girl Scout News

Celebrate 100 Years of Girl Scouting in Colorado with a special license plate

 

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Written by Penny Roberts of Estes Park and AnneMarie Harper, Girl Scouts of Colorado Public Relations Director

2017 marks 100 years of Girl Scouting in Colorado and one of the many ways you can celebrate is by getting a special Girl Scout license plate! It was created in 2012 by a Promise Partners alumnae task force as part of the 100th Anniversary celebration of Girl Scouts of the USA. It has since been available for purchase by anyone who wishes to celebrate and publicize the legacy and continuing efforts of the Girl Scouts of Colorado.

The cost is $50 above the regular license plate fees and the plate can be registered to any type of vehicle, including motorcycles.

Sadly, the Colorado Department of Revenue reports just more than 200 sets of these license plates have been purchased. And since we got more than 3,000 signatures to take our petition to the State Legislature, we hope lots more of you will join us and purchase and display these plates proudly. Even Dad’s Plumbing Co. can put Girl Scout plates on his entire fleet of vehicles!

Request Girl Scout plates at your County Clerk’s office, and they will be shipped directly to you from the State in just a few days. Put them on your motorhome, scooter, new car, or vintage classic.

We promise to wave at you when we see you go by with your new Colorado Girl Scout license plates!

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Colorado Springs

More than three hundred Girl Scout families and friends gathered at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion in Colorado Springs on May 6, 2016 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

More than a dozen Girl Scouts were presented the Gold Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout can earn. All described their projects and how earning the Gold Award has impacted their lives. The amazing young women who inspired the audience included:

  • Katelyn Abbott from Cañon City, Cañon City High School, renovated the courtyard outside of Progressive Care Center, which offers nursing care, rehabilitation therapies, and Alzheimer’s care.
  • After learning a local school was wasting money on trash disposal and recyclable items were being thrown away, Tristina Altman from Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Christian School, developed a recycling program for the school.
  • Madison Block from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, engaged elementary school students in science and other STEM-related topics through a fair attended by more than 300 people.
  • Inspired by her own passion for music, Tierra Carter from Castle Rock, Colorado Springs Early Colleges, brought music to children in the hospital. She visited with more than 300 patients under the age of 8 and offered to teach them simple songs on a keyboard or play for them.
  • Hannah Clair from Colorado Springs, Springs Studio for Academic Excellence, worked to give students at her school a place to discover new friends. She designed and built a weatherproof bench that also stores many toys and games to play while making a new friend.
  • Sarah Depew from Colorado Springs, The George Washington University: Online High School, wrote an almost 80-page booklet that includes original chemistry experiments for homeschool students, along with a parent manual for educators.
  • Maniyah Hart from Colorado Springs, Coronado High School, partnered with Zach’s Place and the Manitou Arts Center to develop an opportunity for children with autism to experience ceramics.
  • Stephanie Huisingh from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon Campus High School, wrote a detailed guide that lays out the specific steps for how to throw a high school party and include students with special needs.
  • Helen Landwehr from Colorado Springs, Air Academy High School, refurbished and redecorated the Severe Special Needs room at Air Academy High School to make it a safe, welcoming, and effective learning environment.
  • Ashley Marttila from Colorado Springs, Doherty High School, created a choir at her church to bring children together and give them the confidence to perform in front of a large audience.
  • Kelsey McKenna from Colorado Springs, Air Academy High School, spread publicity for non-profit junior golf organizations by organizing a junior golf scramble where high school golfers came as mentors for younger girls.
  • Lauren Moran from Colorado Springs, Cheyenne Mountain High School, started a music program at a local retirement community, where high school musicians performed monthly and visited with residents.
  • Angel Potter from Cañon City, Cañon City High School, worked with Loaves and Fishes Ministries of Fremont County and other local non-profits to collect books so children from low-resource families could discover the joy of reading.
  • Meagan Prewitt from Colorado Springs, Coronado High School, created a mobile chest of activities for children with special needs who attend Sunrise United Methodist Church.
  • Alyssa Scaduto from Colorado Springs, Doherty High School, brought books to low-resource families by teaching schools how to hold a used book fair, which can be supported by a book drive.
  • Alessandra Smith from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, created a program that provides residents of care facilities access to iPads and resources to Skype and use other apps to stay in touch with loved ones.

Girl Scouts in grades 9th-12th who earn the Gold Award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. More than two hundred Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4th-5th can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented their awards.

Girl Scouts of Colorado CEO and President Stephanie Foote said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

2015 Gold Award recipient Kelsey Quick served as the celebration’s emcee. She is also the winner of the inaugural Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship. To earn the highest award in Girl Scouts, Kelsey created a website and other materials to help children who have been cyberbullied. You can read more about her project here.

“Through my (Gold Award) project, I learned how to better organize my time, create a budget, and how to create a team of experts to help me successfully complete my project,” she said. “I am proud that my project is being used in several places around the state, throughout school districts and police departments. I hope I can truly make a difference in children’s lives by helping them learn how to deal with cyberbullying.”

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The focus of a Gold Award project is to identify and research a community issue she is passionate about, develop a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establish a global connection with others and provide sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Sarah Greichen awarded Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize

Sarah Greichen, 2016 Gold Award recipient, is the winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Sarah from Centennial, Front Range Christian School, officially accepted her award at the Day at the Capitol Celebration for Girl Scouts of Colorado on Monday, May 2, 2016.  Lawmakers in the House of Representatives broke from traditional business to honor the 48 Girl Scouts from across the state who earned their Gold Awards, the highest award in Girl Scouts, this spring.

Inspired by her twin brother who has an Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sarah started a new non-profit organization, Score A Friend, to encourage more schools to offer and have students participate in unified sports teams and clubs. Sarah was selected as the winner of this $1,000 cash prize by an independent panel. Of Sarah’s project, prize committee members said, “We are delighted at the quality of Gold Award projects we reviewed this year and are thrilled to award the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize to Sarah Greichen whose project exemplifies community impact through leadership.”

The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote.

“Sarah’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

In addition to Sarah’s award, the prize committee chose to honor four deserving Gold Award recipients with the title of Honorable Mention. They are: Belle BashawKellyn DasslerCourtney Howell, and Cassidy Klein. Belle from Parker, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to teach elementary school students about the importance of bees, which bees they might see, and how they can help the bee population thrive. Kellyn from Parker, Chapparal High School, increased students’ respect for teachers and educators. She also worked to encourage teachers throughout the year and made working conditions better for staff by taking items off their “to-do” lists. Courtney from Niwot, Silver Creek High School, organized a science, math, and engineering exploration day for middle and elementary school students to show them that science can be fun. Cassidy from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, collected more than 2,900 children’s books, which she used to create a library for Joshua Station, a transitional housing facility for families.

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is to identify and research a community issue she is passionate about, develop a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establish a global connection with others and provide sustainability for the project.  Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Gold, Silver, and Bronze Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Denver

More than a thousand Girl Scout families and friends gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center on May 1, 2016 to honor Colorado Girl Scouts who earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

Nearly 20 Girl Scouts were presented the Gold Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout can earn. All described their projects and how earning the Gold Award has impacted their lives. The amazing young women who inspired the audience included:

  • Belle Bashaw from Parker, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to teach elementary school students about the importance of bees, which bees they might see, and how they can help the bee population thrive.
  • To expand homeowners’ knowledge of crevice gardens and reduce outdoor water use, Carrie Bishop from Golden, Ralston Valley High School, added an educational aspect to the Apex Community Heroes Crevice Garden in Arvada.
  • Hadley Bowles from Denver, Saint Mary’s Academy, worked with Metro Caring, one of Denver’s largest food assistance programs, to teach low-resource children where healthy food comes from and about eating healthy.
  • Allison Caperton from Littleton, Dakota Ridge High School, coordinated a gymnastics camp for children with special needs. They will have access to the best gymnastics bars for home. Her camp was four weeks long and open to children of all ages with special needs.
  • Grace Dorgan from Golden, Colorado Academy, designed a free, hands-on natural science curriculum and taught it to low-resource elementary school students in Denver, through a program called Horizons.
  • Katelyn Eaman from Broomfield, Broomfield High School, designed raised garden beds so students at her school could learn about gardening and the impact it can have on communities worldwide.
  • Delaney Fitzsimmons’ sister spoke on her behalf. Delaney from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a list of books intended for 5th to 8th grade readers with the purpose of providing a resource for students to find engaging books they will enjoy and finish.
  • Martina Gilbert from Castle Pines, Rock Canyon High School, created a more welcoming, aesthetically pleasing, wheelchair-accessible outdoor area for Fisher House, a home for veterans and their families.
  • Meredith Greer from Golden, Lakewood High School, worked to provide personal hygiene items to clients of The Action Center in Jefferson County.
  • Emma Hesse from Golden, Lakewood High School, revitalized the clothing area of The Action Center in Jefferson County, specifically the area for teens. Her work helped raise the self-confidence of teens served by the center.
  • Cassidy Klein from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, collected more than 2,900 children’s books, which she used to create a library for Joshua Station, a transitional housing facility for families.
  • Kimberly Levine from Longmont, Niwot High School, created a food drive tutorial, which was geared toward English and Spanish-speaking communities who are interested in making a difference.
  • Lauren McBeth from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built “House of Words,” a little free library, in newly renovated Tierra Park in northern Aurora.
  • Olivia Noakes from Thornton, Thornton High School, developed a multi-media presentation about opportunities in middle and high school music that was geared toward 4th and 5th grade students.
  • Nieca Robinson from Aurora, Eaglecrest High School, worked to make it easier for teenagers, specifically those at her school, to find help and resources specifically for them regarding domestic violence.
  • Emily Walker from Castle Rock, Castle Rock High School, created a project that provides teddy bears and handmade no-sew blankets to first responders in order to comfort people involved in traumatic situations.
  • Catherine Welch from Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, helped senior citizens at a local retirement center stay in touch with loved ones by teaching them how to use iPads and other technology.

Girl Scouts in grades 9-12 who earn the Gold Award demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. More than one hundred Bronze Award honorees (the highest award a girl in grades 4-5 can earn) and Silver Award honorees (the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn) also were presented their awards.

Girl Scouts of Colorado CEO and President Stephanie Foote said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

2015 Gold Award recipient Christina Bear served as the celebration’s emcee. She is also the winner the inaugural Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence. To earn the highest award in Girl Scouts, Christina organized a week-long summer program for Latino students at the Horizons Summer Program at Colorado Academy. Through informal learning in computer and robot programming and mini-science experiments, students were engaged and excited about technology.

“The Gold Award taught me the value of doing a project that has impact and sustainability. This is the beauty of ‘Going for the Gold.’ It’s not a one-time community service project. Rather, it’s a Take Action project where Girl Scouts can realistically bring about change and sustain it,” she said.

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The focus of a Gold Award project is to identify and research a community issue she is passionate about, develop a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establish a global connection with others and provide sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Colorado House of Representatives honors Gold Award recipients

On Monday, May 2, Colorado’s House of Representatives broke from traditional business to honor 48 Girl Scouts from across the state who received the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts.  Approximately half of this year’s honorees from along the Front Range were at this recognition, which will took place shortly after the session opened at 10 a.m.  As Girl Scout Gold Award recipients, these girls’ accomplishments reflect extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

In addition to honoring these Girl Scouts and their extraordinary Gold Award projects that benefited communities across the world, Girl Scouts of Colorado also introduced the 2016 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Inspired by her twin brother who has an Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sarah Greichen from Centennial, Front Range Christian School, started a new non-profit organization to encourage more schools to offer and have students participate in unified sports teams and clubs. The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “Sarah’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

Sarah was honored along with four other Gold Award recipients, who the selection committee for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize determined were deserving of Honorable Mention. They are: Belle BashawKellyn DasslerCourtney Howell, and Cassidy Klein. Belle from Parker, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to teach elementary school students about the importance of bees, which bees they might see, and how they can help the bee population thrive. Kellyn from Parker, Chapparal High School, increased students’ respect for teachers and educators. She also worked to encourage teachers throughout the year and made working conditions better for staff by taking items off their “to-do” lists. Courtney from Niwot, Silver Creek High School, organized a science, math, and engineering exploration day for middle and elementary school students to show them that science can be fun. Cassidy from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, collected more than 2,900 children’s books, which she used to create a library for Joshua Station, a transitional housing facility for families.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership is making the world a better place.”

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Two Colorado finalists in Girl Scout Cookies recipe contest

We have some exciting (and delicious) news! Two of the finalists in this year’s “Taste of Home” Girl Scout Cookies recipe contest are from Colorado!

Margaret from Colorado Springs created this “Samoa Swirl No-Churn Ice Cream.”

 Samoa Swirl Ice Cream copy

Jody from La Junta entered a “Fantastic Toffee-tastic Cheesecake.” In addition to creating this delicious dish, Jody is also a Girl Scout! She helps lead a multi-level troop (Daisy-Junior);  assists with recruitment; and serves as her troop’s Fall Sale manager and cookie manager.

Fantastic Toffee-tastic Cheesecake copy

You can vote for Margaret, Jody, or even both by using this link:  http://www.girlscouts.org/en/cookies/all-about-cookies/Cookie-Recipe-Contest.html

 

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Grand Junction

More than 200 Girl Scout families and friends gathered at Colorado Mesa University on April 24, 2016 to honor the more than 1,600 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9th-12th who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in grades 4th and 5th can earn. For the 2015-16 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 30 in Grand Junction and Western Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award. 75 earned the Bronze Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foot said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

2015 Gold Award recipient Mickayla TerLouw served as the celebration’s emcee. In addition to earning her Gold Award, she was also awarded Honorable Mention for the Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize. To earn her Gold Award, Mickayla designed and implemented a program at Orchard Avenue Elementary School, where she organized the first-ever “Fall into Reading Dinner and Game Night.” It was an evening of carnival-style games for kids as well as activities for parents that were designed to advertise and promote family literacy. She collected community donations of hundreds of books to use as prizes for some of these games, which were all book-themed. She also created the Reading Challenge, which was a school-wide competition between the classes to see who could read the most, with bonuses for when students read as a family.

“The Gold Award is a truly exceptional experience, both in the benefit for the community and self-awareness and skill-building the Girl Scout gains,” she said.

Jane Quimby, Director of Public Safety Department, Instructor of Criminal Justice at Colorado Mesa University, and a retired Special Agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, gave the afternoon’s keynote speech. Jane spoke strongly about the character girls develop through activity in organizations like Girl Scouts. “You can’t teach character in a class.” When hiring for the FBI, she looked for character above all. Jane referenced the Girl Scout Law stating, “If only everyone lived by the Girl Scout law, the world would be a better place.”

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Girl Scouts of Colorado will continue to honor this year’s Highest Awards recipients at ceremonies around the state. These events include:

  • May 1st at 2 p.m. at the Denver Marriott Tech Center, 4900 S. Syracuse St., Denver
  • May 6 at 6 p.m. at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion 1661 Mesa Ave., Colorado Springs

 

 

Thank you letters to Girl Scouts

Thank you to all the Girl Scouts who participated in “Hearts Across the Miles” again this year. The program sends Girl Scout Cookies to deployed service members. Girl Scouts, along with other volunteers, helped pack nearly 150 shipping boxes, which included 6,000 packages of Girl Scout Cookies! 2016 Top Seller Ciara Leal and her family brought more than 200 packages, plus a huge number of boxes from Peggy Riordan’s area. Of the 40 addresses provided to “Hearts Across the Miles,” half came from Girl Scouts.  We received the following notes from service members who received the care packages:

Thank you so much for the care packages you sent to us! We really appreciate the warm and encouraging words within the cards. The cookies were amazing! It really means a lot! We had so many cookies delivered, we shared them with other military members throughout our base. Our team also consists of military members from England, Canada and Australia. We let them know where and who they came from; the great people of Colorado! They, too, were very grateful and appreciative of the cookies. The drawings and cards made us smile and remind us of why we do what we do out here. We do it for each and every one of you.

A special thanks to Al and Julie, Jacqui, Bruce, Silvia, Michelle & Daniel, Bill, and Will, Lockheed Martin, our fellow troops at Buckley AFB, our brothers and sisters from St. Michael’s Catholic Church, The Young Marines, our brothers and sisters from Bethany Lutheran Church, the great city of Lone Tree, the Colorado National Guard, Rangeview High School staff and students, all the wonderful HATM volunteersn and the great people of the Denver Metro Community! And of course, our sweet and dedicated Girl Scouts of America, who without you, none of this would be possible.

God bless all of you!

Very respectfully,

Technical Sergeant John J. Vega

______________________________________________________________________

Hi there,

On behalf of the J2 shop for the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) here in Iraq, I wanted to thank you for the massive amount of Girl Scout Cookies- my Soldiers have devoured them! It’s such a blessing knowing that people like you are thinking about us.

CPT Rob Vendley

______________________________________________________________________

Your box of cookies arrived and will be shared among grateful soldiers. Thank you so much, nothing better to put smiles on soldier’s faces than Girl Scouts cookies from. Your dedication and hard work is appreciated. Thank you also, for all your prayers and support.

You are my heroes!

Father Emmanuel

______________________________________________________________________

I unexpectedly received a wonderful package from your organization this afternoon. My name is Dillon and I am currently stationed in Kuwait. Along with the goodies I also received two wonderful colorings from, Robbie and Chris. I just wanted to take a minute to say thank you for all you do. This package was a wonderful surprise and not only lifted my spirits, but also those with whom I am serving. There are only four of us in my office, so I was able to take a few boxes of cookies and some of the goodies for us and I give the rest away to other troops who, like me, always enjoy a good girl scout cookie. Keep up the great work and know your efforts are truly appreciated it. Thanks again from the Camp Buehring CID Office.

Dillon, Jose, Orin, and Marcos

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Pueblo

Nearly one hundred Girl Scout families and friends gathered at the Center for American Values on April 22, 2016 to honor the more than 1,600 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in grades 4th and 5th can earn. For the 2015-16 Girl Scout awards program year, more than one thousand girls across the state and 24 in Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last two years, 18 girls across Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado COO Jacky Noden said the girls’ spirit and motivation inspires us all to think of the needs of others and take action to make the world a better place.

“You are strong role models for our community and our world,” she said.

Gold Award recipient and Troop Leader Carrie Chase served as the celebration’s keynote speaker. She talked briefly about earning her Gold Award, but most of her speech focused on how becoming a troop leader has impacted not only her and her daughter’s lives, but also how she has seen it change the lives of girls throughout Pueblo and southeastern Colorado.

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100thanniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Girl Scouts of Colorado will continue to honor this year’s Highest Awards recipients at ceremonies around the state. These events include:

  • May 1st at 2 p.m. at the Denver Marriott Tech Center, 4900 S. Syracuse St., Denver
  • May 6 at 6 p.m. at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion 1661 Mesa Ave., Colorado Springs

 

 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Nancy Mucklow

Nancy Mucklow

 

Ask Nancy Mucklow how long she’s been a Girl Scout and she’ll say “forever!” This lifetime Girl Scout joined our sisterhood in the second grade and hasn’t looked back. She planned on having a daughter and becoming a troop leader, but life doesn’t always work out like we plan.

After she and her husband moved to Steamboat in 1989, they had two boys. Nancy remained involved in Girl Scouts as a Service Unit Manager, but soon the boys’ 4H activities required more of her attention. Even though Girl Scouts had to “take the backseat” for a few years, she remained involved and did what she could to support local girls, leaders, and other volunteers.  After her youngest son graduated from high school a few years ago, she jumped full force back into Girl Scouts.

“Nancy has REALLY helped grow Girl Scouts in our Mountain Communities, particularly in her service unit,” said Cricket Hawkins, Volunteer Support Specialist for Girl Scouts of Colorado.

So, how did she do it? Nancy will tell you it was one volunteer…  one troop… one girl at a time. She got to know each of them personally. What did they want to do as Girl Scouts? What did they need help with? What activities did they only dream of doing and what was getting in their way of accomplishing their goals?

Nancy did all she could to help. She worked to secure local funding, which enabled Routt County Girl Scouts to go horseback riding regardless of their ability to pay. She has also helped to organize a STEM Day, troop camping trips, and events designed for specific age groups, like Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors.

“Our older girls need to be participating in events designed just for them, so Girl Scouts is more than just a line on their resume or college application,” she said.

Nancy realizes she is able to do more than the average volunteer, but that doesn’t stop her from encouraging others to help whenever and wherever they can.

“Whatever small amount you are doing—whether it’s providing snacks at a meeting or driving girls to a field trip–  it’s important. Even if you can only do one small thing, it matters and it makes a difference in the lives of girls,” Nancy said.

Nancy is also a member of the Girl Scouts Board of Directors. Her term expires later this year, so she applied for a seat on the GSCO Membership Connection Committee. In addition to her role as a Girl Scout volunteer, Nancy also sits on the board of the Routt County United Way and volunteers with the local Methodist church.