Category Archives: Girl Scout News

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Grace Dorgan, Golden, “The Nature Now Project”

Grace Dorgan

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I addressed the need for free, natural science curricula that gets kids outdoors to foster a love of nature and science.  I designed a free, hands-on natural science curriculum for elementary aged students that can be taught anywhere by anyone.  I taught this program to urban, underserved, minority students in Denver. I put together an in-depth manual that included all lessons, learning objectives, worksheets, visuals and teaching suggestions. I then created a website for the curriculum where the manual is posted so that anyone, anywhere can access and teach it.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I taught the program to second graders over a time frame of six weeks.  Before I began the program, I surveyed students, asking them to rate their knowledge on topics to be covered, as well as their personal feelings towards science, as one of my goals was to encourage an interest in science.  Very few students reported liking science or picturing themselves as scientists in the future.  After teaching the program, I surveyed them again and found that every child understood the main ideas taught and almost every child now reported loving science and could easily picture themselves as scientists in the future.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My program will continue to be taught at Horizons at Colorado Academy, a six-week long summer program serving underprivileged children from Denver that transforms the way students see themselves and their future, while also improving their reading and math skills significantly.  In addition, I made a digital manual and hosted it online on a website I created so that instructors anywhere could access and teach the program.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

By creating a website I have put my curriculum on the internet, which allows anyone in the world to access it.  A fun, free, outdoor science curriculum is something that many people all over the world need, and with this extra education, the same kids will grow up to be conscious and contributing global citizens.

What did you learn about yourself?

Throughout the project I had a lot of people who volunteered to work with me.  Without them I never would have finished this project, and I never would have developed the leadership skills I did.  I learned to rely on myself as a project coordinator, and I learned that I possess the perseverance necessary to see such a long term project to completion.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I will absolutely be using my new found skills of public speaking, project management, and communication in my future, whether in college or the workforce.  I also have new confidence in myself that I can accomplish something meaningful.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

This project was the culmination of all the skills I have learned in 10 years of Girl Scouts.  I made a meaningful, positive difference, I developed my leadership and interpersonal skills, I learned a lot about responsibility, and I learned how to stay focused and keep going.  This project was an important part of my Girl Scout experience, but also an important part of growing up.  Girl Scouts has really given me the opportunity to recognize my capabilities, and to make the world a better place.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Amy Nelson, Colorado Springs, “The ABC’s of Eating Healthy”

Amy Nelson

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a cookbook that taught the basics of a healthy, nutritious diet while on a small budget. The book included over 90 recipes and ideas for incorporating inexpensive and healthy foods into one’s diet. I worked with programs such as the Elevate Food Pantry and the Care and Share Food Bank to distribute the books to families and individuals across Colorado and beyond to spread awareness of the possibilities of eating healthy with little time and a tight budget.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project by the number of families my book was made available to. 25 physical copies of my book were distributed to the families within the Elevate Food Pantry Program in October. Elevate is a non-profit organization that operates within the area of Cheyenne Mountain School District 12, providing food and snacks to families with children who qualify for free or reduced meals at school. I also sent the digital copy of my cookbook to local libraries, Mary’s Home (a local organization that helps single homeless mothers and their children), and the Care and Share Food Bank, where it was attached to their monthly newsletter and sent to over 300 food banks and soup kitchens across Colorado.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained beyond my involvement because the cookbooks will be used again and again by the families they were distributed to. Digital copies of my book were also distributed to soup kitchens and food banks across Colorado, who now will be able to print out copies of the book whenever there is demand. I also gave copies to my school and several local libraries so they could be used by anyone interested in my project (or in eating healthier) at any time.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project addresses the issue of obesity. This is a massive problem, not only in the United States, but also around the world. Nearly 39% of the adult population of the world is overweight, with 13% of those people qualifying as obese. The only way to lower these numbers is through forming a habit of healthy diet and exercise, and by teaching the benefits of eating healthy to kids so they can keep those lessons with them for the rest of their lives. I was able to spread these lessons by working with Elevate, local libraries, Mary’s Home, and Care and Share Food Program, who helped to distribute my book to many people and families that could learn from them.

What did you learn about yourself?

This project taught me not only about the benefits and importance of maintaining healthy diet, but also more than I thought I would about myself. This project was not an easy task, and took me over 80 hours of research, testing, calculating, creating, assembling, and distributing the books to complete it. It was through this hard work that I realized that I was capable of achieving whatever I set my mind to because I had the skills in communication and organization, as well as persistence and drive within me to overcome the obstacles I faced.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award is a huge honor, and the lessons I have learned from it will continue to help me throughout the rest of my life. My Gold Award taught me not to give up, especially when times get tough and to always remember to budget my time correctly and stay organized when working on a project. Since the Gold Award is such a high honor, earning it has and will also help me in job and scholarship interviews and throughout the application process to college.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I used so many of the lessons I had learned throughout my Girl Scout career to complete it. Girl Scouts teaches girls across the world to be capable, smart, and hard working individuals. To earn the award, young women must prove that they are all three. The Gold Award is the pinnacle of achievement in Girl Scouts and earning it closes the door from one stage of my life and opens the door for the next, where I will be able to use the lessons Girl Scouting has taught me to make a difference in the world.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kimberly Levine, Longmont, “Food Drives to Save Lives”

Kimberly Levine

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

In an effort to spread awareness of hunger within the community, as well as to rally others around helping fight hunger, I created a food drive tutorial. The tutorial was geared toward English and Spanish-speaking communities who were interested in making a difference.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The impact of this project can be measured through the amount of views the tutorial receives on media platforms, such as YouTube. If more people in a community see the video, food banks could receive more donations. The video stressed the necessity of food donations, so the video’s capability to inspire is great.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

This project will be sustained through the media platforms which support my video. Both the English and Spanish videos have been posted on YouTube and my local food bank has been provided with necessary information to access and upload the videos to their website. These videos will be accessible for all future generations, so people can watch it and be inspired to help for many years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The video was translated into Spanish so that two separate dialects would be able to understand the message of how to fight hunger. The videos were also sent to the National Home Owners Association so that HOAs all over the United States could have knowledge and access to the tutorial. In addition, a local food bank has access to distribute the video to other HOAs and people who are looking for ways to help out.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I still have a lot of work to do on my leadership skills. This project helped me identify all of the areas that I need to work on, such as public speaking and time management. Throughout the process of the project, I was able to work harder on skills that I was lacking.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I know that I will continue to grow as a leader. This project has really shown me that the best leaders are always evolving and that it’s impossible to know exactly how to lead a group at all times. I was able to learn a lot about group dynamics and how to effectively communicate what I needed as far as directing the video. Also, I learned a lot about the importance of time management, I will continue to work on developing this essential skill.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award provided an excellent culmination of all of the lessons I had learned through my Bronze and Silver Awards. I thought it was an excellent way to wrap up my Girl Scouting career before I graduate high school. This experience allowed me to really dig deep and execute a project that will actually make a difference in the world. I am very proud of my hard work and the final product.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Voting begins in #BlingYourBooth contest

Bling Your Booth2

Thank you to everyone who entered this year’s #BlingYourBooth contest! We received dozens of entries and are so impressed by the creativity and enthusiasm of all of these cookie-bosses. Now, it is time to rally your friends and family to vote!

All of the entries have been uploaded to our Facebook page and are part of the album: #BlingYourBooth Challenge 2016. Tell your friends and family to vote for your entry by simply clicking “like.” The photo that receives the most likes by March 1 at 9 a.m. wins!

 First Prize: $200 in Cookie Credits

Second Prize: $100 in Cookie Credits

Third Prize: $50 in Cookie Credits

If you have questions, please email Girl Scouts of Colorado Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Carrie Bishop, Golden, “Unknown Garden Crevices”

Carrie Bishop

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award Project, I addressed the need for low water landscaping through adding an educational aspect to the Community Heroes Crevice Garden at the Apex Simms Street Center. In addition to fundraising for and purchasing a bench, I also designed and purchased an educational sign and a website domain (www.communityheroesgarden.com). The website provides information on my Gold Award project, crevice gardening, and information specific to the Community Heroes Crevice Garden.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my Gold Award project through a brief survey accessible from the website, as well as a website hit counter on the homepage of the website. All of the responses from the survey showed an increase in knowledge about crevice gardens, and most people surveyed responded that they would be more likely to create a crevice garden in place of a traditional garden in the future. In the time the website has been public (since September 30), there have been 690 views on it (as of February 10, 2016).

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

After my involvement, my project will be sustained by the Apex Parks and Recreation Department and Rocky Mountain Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society, which has over 300 registered members. Both of these organizations have committed to keep up the garden, with Apex doing general ground maintenance, and RMC-NARGS continuing to plant and maintain the plant garden and website as a whole. The Community Heroes Crevice Garden has also received permission to use Jefferson County Open Space funding.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I created a public website that is visible to anyone, and can be accessed anywhere. The website is www.communityheroesgarden.com. I have also contacted the department heads at Parks and Recreation departments in the area, and shared my project and the website with them, so that they, if they choose, can implement the idea and further share it in their communities. I shared my website and project with family members who live in other states, and they have shared the website further. I have received survey responses from Colorado, New Mexico, California, Florida, and even Victoria, Canada. I presented my project to the Apex board on December 10  and was the first Girl Scout who had done so. The North American Rock Garden Society has also included the Community Heroes Crevice Garden in a national brochure that they published. I have also written a blog post, “Unknown Crevice Gardens”, to further share my project. In addition, The Colorado Water Conservation Board listed the Community Heroes Crevice Garden as a xeriscape demonstration garden on their website, along with a link.

What did you learn about yourself?

Throughout my project, I learned that I need a time plan to keep myself accountable and make progress on a long term project. I learned how to communicate with multiple organizations and companies, and how to coordinate an event. Also, I learned that I can be a good leader.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will provide me with essential communication and collaboration skills, as well as the ability to successfully budget. Also, completing the award gave me the confidence to know that I can accomplish anything.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was a huge part of my Girl Scout experience; it took many of the skills and abilities I have learned from 10 years of Girl Scouts, and allowed me to apply the knowledge to create an amazing addition to the community garden. It was a great cumulative experience, and I will continue to hold the memories of my project as some of the best in my Girl Scouting career.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emily Walker, Castle Rock, “Community Comfort”

Emily Walker 2

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a project that provides teddy bears and made no-sew blankets to the Castle Rock Fire and Rescue and Castle Rock Police Department. Both organizations will distribute my items during emergency situations in order to offer comfort to people involved in traumatic situations.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Each blanket has a tag which identifies this as a Gold Award project and contains a link to a survey which people who have received my items can complete, if they choose to do so, which asks if they felt comforted by the item.   Contacts at the CRFD and CRPD have agreed to provide feedback from their responders regarding how victims reacted upon receiving a teddy bear and/or blanket.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The Meadows Neighborhood Board of Governors has agreed to make Community Comfort an annual event for the Meadows. The BIONIC (Believe It Or Not I Care) group at Castle Rock Middle School has agreed to take over my project.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My national connection was to research other projects that are taking place throughout the country that are similar to mine. For my global connection, I established contact with a Girl Guide Leader in the United Kingdom who had earned her own Gold Award and knows of groups in the United Kingdom who wish to start a project in similarity to mine in their area.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am capable of doing a large project such as a Gold Award project, and that I am able to inspire others to do community-benefiting projects of their own. Additionally, I now know that I cannot do everything by myself, and that it is okay to ask others for assistance.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I know now the importance of time management and better understand how to best manage my time, a practice I will be using at college. I also will continue to do volunteer service and community-based projects in order to help others as I have through my Gold Award. I am also more confident in my abilities for public speaking and interacting with those in authority or administration, a skill that will greatly benefit me in my future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Ever since I was a Daisy, I have wanted to earn my Gold Award. I believe that through my project, I have a greater understanding about my community and myself, and have learned very useful and important life skills which I may not have earned if I did not complete my Gold Award project.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Parking & transportation information for Girl Scouts’ birthday celebration

Join us as we celebrate Girl Scouts’ 104th birthday, along with brave, incredible women who have led the way for today’s generation of young women.

When: Saturday, March 12, 2016 * 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Where: Denver Public Library, 7th Floor, Vida Ellison Gallery
10 W. Fourteenth Ave. Pkwy. Denver 80204

Here are some resources to help you and your troop plan your trip downtown.

This year, the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame is hosting an exhibit of their 146 inductees, 39 of whom are Girl Scouts of Colorado Women of Distinction. The exhibitors have generously extended an invitation for Girl Scouts of Colorado to host activities during Girl Scout week.

All girls in attendance will receive a special event patch.

10 – 11 a.m. : Highest Awards and Take Action training for troop leaders (registration required)

11:30 a.m. : Sing-A-Long with GSCO Songbirds choir!

Noon : Council Update from President & CEO Stephanie Foote

12:30-3:30 p.m. The Girl Scout Way Badge workshop for Brownies, Juniors,  Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors. Come celebrate and complete requirements towards this fun badge. Daisies are welcome to join the fun, too!

Stop by for anytime activities including birthday refreshments, tours of the Women’s Hall of Fame exhibit, badge earning opportunities and service projects. Also, see the GSCO archives roadshow and meet the History Committee! Bring your own Girl Scout memorabilia to be identified by the committee!

Questions? Contact Heidi.books@gscolorado.org or 303-607-4833

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Hadley Bowles, Denver, “Sustainable Secrets”

Hadley Louise Keist Bowles

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Usually people have some resources to get food but do not know enough about healthy eating. For my Gold Award Project I focused on helping kids learn where food comes from and about healthy options. To do that, I created an educational program for Metro Caring that was geared to teach kids about food and sustainable crafts. Metro Caring is one of Denver’s largest food assistance programs. It has a fresh food shopping market for low income people at no charge. To help it have available fresh food, it also has gardens for vegetables. Every day Metro Caring distributes food, baby items and personal care products to an average of 70 people.

In 2015, Metro Caring completed construction on n a new building. The new building includes a learning area for kids, as well as a classroom for Metro Caring to teach adults about healthy foods. My program is to provide kids a learning activity while their parents are either shopping in the food market or attending a class at Metro Caring.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Hunger is a world problem. By starting with kids at a young age you can teach them how to work with what they have or learn to improve things to eat a little at a time. Once they understand healthy eating, they can spread the word to their parents and others. They may even grow to help others learn what they did. Hunger is everywhere but with these classes maybe a few more people will be able to improve their eating.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained by volunteers at Metro Caring. I have prepared 15 lesson plans for Metro Caring to use for children’s activities and put together supplies for the activities. I copied the lesson plans and put them into three notebooks to make it easy for volunteers to use and add new ideas. I wrote an article about my project for the Metro Caring newsletter so that their volunteers and supporters can learn more about the work I did for my Gold Award. The article was published and is a way to let volunteers know how they can help with the program. I am going to also write a similar article for the Kirk (my church) newsletter for members who might want to do something more at Metro Caring. When the supplies were delivered, Metro Caring was excited and the new volunteer coordinator believed there were several volunteers who are retired teachers that would be interested in doing the classes. In addition to my article in the Newsletter, the coordinator plans to recruit volunteers to teach.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Around the world there is approximately 925 million people who are under nourished on a daily basis. This means they get less than 2,100 calories a day. This despite world being able to produce enough food to feed everyone. Closer to home, more than 200,000 children in Colorado live below the poverty line. Also, more that 25% of working families in Colorado do not have enough food by the end of the month. Although Metro Caring is working to address these food needs, they do not have a program to help children understand food, what is good for them and how they can create things from other things. My Gold Award project focuses on children and their understanding of food.

What did you learn about yourself?

My Gold Award project taught me about what I could do—to have courage to lead and to learn at the same time. It also taught me the importance of self-confidence. This was a big project. I put it off for a long time because I did not know what to do. Once I got started though, I figured out I could do it as long as I kept things moving forward. Also, I learned the importance of communication. I needed to keep Metro Caring more informed of my progress. Then when I taught the kids, I learned I had to adjust my lessons based on the age of the kids or if they spoke English. Finally, it taught me that I can make a difference in the world.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Having made this project work, I suspect I will be more open to leadership positions because of the self-confidence I gained while working on my Gold Award. I learned to accomplish new things, such as new projects to help others, and I may even find a new idea that I want to develop further in my future.  Earning my Gold Award, has given me a sense of pride that I will not hesitate to mention to others.  I also think it will help open doors to other opportunities.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Ever since I joined Girl Scouts, I have wanted to get my Gold Award. The reason being that my brother was a Boy Scout and was doing a ton of fun things. So I though in Girl Scouts I could do the same things and I did. We went backpacking, canoeing, camping, spelunking and more I had a ton of fun. But then my brother started working on his Eagle project and I wanted to do one to. So I looked at what Girl Scouts had to offer and I found the Bronze, Silver and Gold Awards. So I started working on them. The Bronze was fun and we did it as a troop. The Silver was more interesting doing it on my own with help from my mom. Then it was time I was old enough to do my Gold Award. I choose something that I wanted to have an impact on and change. The experience was great and it taught me a lot. It was a lot of fun and was a good way I felt to graduate from Girl scouts to being a Counselor.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Cooking with Girl Scout Cookies on 9News/KUSA-TV

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Colorado Girl Scout Crystal Schlueter was a finalist in the first-ever National Girl Scout Cookie Recipe Contest, sponsored by Taste of Home in 2015. Crystal, who is from Northglenn, created a “German Chocolate Ice Cream Cookie Torte.”

To help promote the 2016 Girl Scout Cookies sale, Crystal joined Media Stars Anna and Mika for an interview with Corey Rose of 9News/ KUSA-TV. Girl Scouts showed Corey how to make Crystal’s “German Chocolate Ice Cream Cookie Torte” and talked about the sale. To watch the interview, click here.

Click the links below for Crystal’s “German Chocolate Ice Cream Cookie Torte” recipe and other recipes she created using Girl Scout Cookies.

German Chocolate Ice Cream Cookie Torte Pic 4

German Chocolate Ice Cream Cookie Torte Recipe

Samoas Hot Chocolate Pic 1

Samoas Hot Chocolate Recipe

Toffee Apple Crumble Cups Pic

Toffee Apple Crumble Cups Recipe

Girl Scout Cookie time means contest time

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There are so many ways for you to win BIG during this year’s Girl Scout Cookies sale. We’re hosting a variety of contests, including ones for best cookie video and best cookie dad.

Each contest is listed below along with a brief description. To learn more about the rules, deadlines, etc., click on the contest name. It will take you to the blog announcing the contest.

Best Cookie Video Contest

Selling Girl Scout Cookies online? Make sure you’re taking advantage of all the tools, which Digital Cookie gives you to be creative and customize your website, like creating and uploading a video. In addition to attracting more customers and increasing sales, your video could earn you $200 in Cookie Credits!

Share Your Awesome Cookie-Earnings Stories

We’re so excited to hear about all of the amazing things you will do with your cookie money! Help us celebrate girls and inspire customers to support you by submitting your cookie-earnings story here. Be sure to include your goals, Hometown Hero, and troop number, along with a fun pic of you and your troop! Submit yours by March 13, 2016 and you will get a free, fun patch.

 Colorado Girl Scouts: #BlingYourBooth

The #BlingYourBooth Challenge is back and this year, you could win up to $200 in Cookie Credits! This is also your chance to come up with fun and creative ways to attract more customers and increase sales.

Why is your Cookie Dad the best?

Dads are an important part of the Girl Scouts of Colorado Cookie Team. That’s why we honor dads, who help cookie bosses all across Colorado meet their goals. If your Cookie Dad is the best, write a short essay about what he does that is so awesome and submit it through the Share Your Stories form on the Girl Scouts of Colorado blog.

If you have questions, please email Girl Scouts of Colorado Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper.