Category Archives: Girl Scout News

Colorado Springs Gold Award candidate constructs special shelter for feral cats

Girl Scout Gold Award candidate Leah J. from Colorado Springs constructed a catio, an outdoor cat shelter for feral cats, for the rescue group Look What the Cat Brought In. On Sunday, November 4, 2018, she hosted an open house at the shelter to showcase the catio to the public.

Leah describes her project:

I have always been an animal person, but I am particularly drawn to animals in need. I know I cannot adopt every animal out there that needs a home, so I do everything I can to help make their lives better. Feral cats are a particular challenge. People don’t want them running loose and creating a bigger problem by having more cats. But, rescue organizations are often ill-equipped to adequately address the needs of cats that are used to roaming the great outdoors.  Until they are adopted to live out their lives as barn cats, feral cats must be kept safe at a rescue, which usually means in indoor spaces. To help improve the lives of these cats, I built a cat patio, a catio, where the cats can go to feel the sun and wind, but still be safe. My catio is connected to the rescue’s building so that cats may use the windows to go indoors or outdoors as they choose. The positive effect this choice has had on the cats has been seen in terms of calmer cats; they are no longer always afraid, they have become more accepting of humans, and some are even showing trust towards humans. It thrills me to have made such a difference in the lives of the 12 cats currently living with access to my catio. I hope other organizations with feral cats will build their own!

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Fox21News/ KXRM-TV featured Leah’s project during one of their broadcasts.

 

 

Earning the “First Aid” badge

Submitted by Samantha King

Pueblo & Southeastern CO

Pueblo

Girl Scouts in Pueblo West had fun learning hands-on first aid at a recent workshop held by Service Unit 338. Girl Scouts spoke to an RN and a representative from Red Cross. They learned about 911, wound care, CPR, what to do if someone is choking, and what steps to take in an emergency situation. All girls had fun, earned a badge, learned important skills, and left the workshop able to better help the community and people around them.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Brownies journey through Wonderland

Submitted by Jen Rotar

Northern & Northeastern CO

Berthoud

On November 3, 2018, 32 Brownies from seven different troops took the marvelous “Journey Through Wonderland,” hosted by Troop 70700 of Berthoud. The Cadettes designed, organized, and led this “Journey in a Day,” with whimsical activities based on Lewis Carroll’s original story.

The Brownies earned their “World of Girls” Journey by telling their own stories, practicing teamwork, getting creative, and making healthy choices.

They topped off the day by creating Kindness Cards to distribute in their own communities as a Take Action project. Imagining what would happen if the Queen of Hearts sent her card soldiers to spread kindness, each Brownie will share their Kindness Cards in their own communities.

While the Brownies said they loved all the activities of the day, the favorites were definitely the Mad Hatter Hat Station and Caterpillar teamwork challenge.

Each station was designed and led by Cadettes, who worked through the challenges of planning the event and gained confidence in their own leadership abilities.

Troop 70700 is hosting “Journey Through Wonderland” again in December (already sold out), and is planning additional sessions for 2019. To be placed on an interest list for upcoming sessions, please email Troop 70700 leader Jen Rotar at rotarjen@msn.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Cadette troop visits Lockheed Martin CHIL Lab

Submitted by Christi Bontempo

Metro Denver

Littleton

Littleton Cadettes from Troop 62252 toured the Lockheed Martin CHIL (Collaborative Human Immersive Laboratory) on October 30, 2018. In this space, Lockheed Martin uses virtual reality to create and analyze simulations that are used for engineering solutions before manufacturing begins on products used in space exploration, solar arrays, and imaging satellites. These Girl Scouts have been building and creating in virtual reality through the DECTech program at the Colorado School of Mines. This STEM outreach program is designed especially for girls. The leaders are female Mines students with a passion for engineering, who want to engage the next generation of girls by introducing them to hands-on applications via virtual reality, chemistry, computers, and mathematics. The girls from Troop 62252 have ventured into coding and become familiar with the computer and engineering atmosphere at one of the best engineering schools in the country. Their experience has been amazing and their work was extremely fun. They have attended three out of four classes at the School of Mines and are looking forward to finishing their assignments at the last class.

For more information on STEM classes for all girls: https://tech.mines.edu/

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Silver Award project: Installing Little Free Libraries at community parks

Submitted by Hailey and Megan T.

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

We love reading and wanted to share that with our community. As Girl Scouts, we decided to make this our Silver Award project and partnered with Grand Junction Parks and Recreation. We started with a Little Free Library at Lincoln Park playground. We designed, built, and installed the Little Free Library on Earth Day 2018. The theme was trees because it went with the tree theme at Lincoln Park playground. Then, Grand Junction Parks and Rec asked us to build another Little Free Library at another city park, Canyon View, and we agreed. We kept the same design for the most part, but had a sports theme for this library because it fits in with the theme of sports at this park. We learned a lot from this experience including woodworking skills, patience, and time management. We really enjoy reading, so this was a great opportunity for us to help the community read more and earn our Silver Award.

News Channel 11/KKCO-TV in Grand Junction even featured our project on one of their broadcasts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwA_-jxga-E

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Second Service Unit 747 hike

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

A few Girl Scouts from Service Unit 747 went out in the chilly Sunday weather to hike at Hewlett Gulch. Since it ended up being all older girls, they decided to do the entire trail. They hiked eight miles altogether! The next service unit hike is not until April, but be on look out for it! We hope to have more girls join in next time.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twelve Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Emma Lily from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Junior Troop 416 earns “Business Owner” badge at Rita’s

Submitted by Christy Knight

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

Junior Troop 416 earned the “Business Owner” badge at Rita’s Italian Ice Creamery in Castle Rock. The girls learned how the owners decided to open the small business and some of the steps of setting up the store. They learned about marketing and customer service. They toured the store, watched how the ice was made, and learned about day-to-day operations. The girls also got to taste some of the ice! The owners answered all the girls questions about the business. They had a first-hand experience about small business and learned a lot of new information.

We loved learning about this small business that does a lot to help their community. Knowing about future options is exciting! We were able to ask so many questions.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Brownies learn the importance of cybersecurity and STEM

Submitted by Courtney Ryan

Metro Denver

Denver

The internet and media are a daily part of our Girl Scouts’ lives and we felt it was important to arm them with the knowledge and understanding of how to stay safe while engaging with these sources. This is why we selected to pursue the cybersecurity badges and patches for our troop! Please enjoy the story about defending our castles, but tread carefully, you may find an alligator, a bear trap, or a grenade disguised as candy…

One high-energy afternoon, a bunch of Girl Scouts in Troop 65709
eagerly awaited the starting tune to learn how to keep themselves safe
in cyberland, all while running a race from alligators, bears, and secret predators.

They brainstormed and created elaborate defenses to keep out enemies pretenses, creating trap doors, moats, secret entrances, invisible castles, and candy tricks.

They discussed and debated the best shields and learned how it related  to keeping them safe in daily practice fields.

These G.I.R.L.s are armed and ready to take on the world and be safe when it comes to cyberland!

The girls came up with very creative ideas on defending their castles, family, and friends. They learned about how to layer defenses and how that relates to online defenses with passwords and safeguards they use every day. It was a great start to arming them with the knowledge to keep themselves safe while online! Our troop is pursing the cybersecurity trifecta of badges: Basics, Safeguards, and Investigator.

By completing this activity, the girls will earn this special cybersecurity patch. Learn how to earn yours.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Angela Foote, Centennial, “Computers for All”

 What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project helps provide computers to families in need. My project works directly with Family Promise of Greater Denver. Family Promise of Greater Denver is an organization that is dedicated to serving families experiencing homelessness. I chose to work with Family Promise of Greater Denver to help provide them with computers for high school students enrolled in their program. My project then grew to getting computers for the entire family.

I learned about Family Promise of Greater Denver through my church. Our church hosts families four times a year. I volunteer for them by making meals and by providing babysitting when the families are at our church. I have met several homeless teens going to school without a computer. I couldn’t imagine not having a computer for school. This is what has helped me identify the need for my project.

In my search for computers, I found another non-profit, Denver Tech for All.  Denver Tech for All has agreed to provide the computers to Family Promise of Greater Denver families in need. Currently, more than 100 computers have been distributed since January 2018.

I wanted to help Denver Tech for All by hosting a computer equipment collection. This allowed my project to help other individuals that needed a computer that are not part of Family Promise of Greater Denver.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

One long-term impact for my target audience is learning computer skills that will serve them over their lifetime. Family Promise of Greater Denver shared this success story.

“A single mom and her two teenage daughters all got laptops.  Because of that, the mom (who had been unemployed) was able to search for jobs and apply online, and she got hired and is now employed full-time!  And her daughters are able to do their schoolwork at home now – and one of them made the honor roll and won an award for ‘most improved 9th grader’.”   

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Denver Tech for All has agreed to provide computers to five families every week through Family Promise of Greater Denver.  These computers are free and the individual can come back to Denver Tech for All for technical support at any time.  Additionally, six companies have agreed to provide Denver Tech for All any computer equipment they no longer need.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have shared the success of my project with Family Promise headquarters in New Jersey.  There is an article published on their website about this project (https://familypromise.org/category/the-latest/) and it was shared on social media.  Additionally, my project success has been shared with over 200 Family Promise affiliates around the United States.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I am a hard worker and I really enjoy helping in the community. I learned how to communicate with people and get my point across.

At the computer equipment drive, I learned I had great leadership skills. I helped organize the collection of the computer equipment and trained my volunteers.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning the Gold Award has prepared me not to give up, even if I receive rejection or run into obstacles. During my project, I had times when it became difficult, but I pushed past the obstacles and completed strong.  Knowing I can do this will be invaluable in my future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I identified a need in my community and I found a solution. I have my troop to thank. The years leading up to my Gold Award, we did several projects and I learned a lot about completing projects. I was lucky to belong to a great troop full of love, friends, and support.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning the Gold Award helped me become a go-getter.  All of the goals that I set; I have surpassed. I wanted two tons of computer equipment for Denver Tech for All to be donated and so far, they have received 2.5 tons; I wanted all teens enrolled in Family Promise of Greater Denver to receive computers (about 20-30 teens) which they did plus computers have been given to all family members over the age of five enrolled in Family Promise of Greater Denver. I wanted to get five companies to continue donating computer equipment to Denver Tech for All and I have six companies.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org