Category Archives: Girl Scout News

Scholarship available for Camp Realize Your Beauty

Submitted by Stacey Lorin Merkl

New York

Camp Realize Your Beauty is a sleepaway theatre arts camp with a special emphasis on building self-esteem, kindness and anti-bullying. This summer we’ll be in Estes Park at the YMCA from July 30-August 4. 

Camp is fast approaching, and we just had a spot open up that we need to fill with a Jr. Counselor. Jr Counselors are young women ages 15-18 who would like to attend camp, and can attend at a reduced rate (or in this case, on scholarship, as we have scholarship funds available) in exchange for some light help (supervising younger campers at bedtime, leading simple warm up games, etc.). This is a great opportunity for any young person interested in theatre, arts education. counseling or social work, or just someone that would like to attend a fun sleepaway camp who may not otherwise have the opportunity. It’s also a great opportunity for a Girl Scout getting her Silver or Gold award.

I realize we’re fast approaching our camp dates, and I know the Girl Scouts would be a great place to find the right match. As a native of Denver (born and raised!), and a life long Girl Scout, I know first hand how responsible and dedicated Scouts are. 

We have a scholarship for this camper, so they could attend at no cost.

Our website is: realizeyourbeauty.org. Please don’t hesitate to contact Stacey with any questions at 917-379-5855.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Sarah Ness, Centennial, “Destressing Art Sessions”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was created to address the high amount of stress seen in the student body at my high school, Eaglecrest High School. I held art sessions after school in the art rooms in order to help kids at my school be able to relieve stress. I worked with the National Art Honor Society and Art Club, along with the teachers that sponsor both of those clubs, in order to hold the art sessions. At the end, I had held 23 sessions.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by giving students a survey I had made and asking them if they were feeling stressed and if they thought that the session helped to relieve their stress. In the surveys, 100% of the people surveyed answered that they were feeling stressed, with the reasons why being “family,” “schoolwork,” “work,” “sleep or the lack thereof,” and “expectations for the future.” Along with that, 100% of the survey takers said that the session did help them feel less stressed.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global/national connection is made through the access to free downloads of a manual for the sessions, and some project examples, on the website teacherspayteachers.com. I’ve also created an Instagram account that is dedicated to examples of project ideas and step-by-step instructions for how to do the projects.

What did you learn about yourself?

I’ve learned that I’m a lot more adaptable to situations that I wasn’t expecting and that I’m more capable of being a leader than what I was expecting.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think earning my Gold Award will help show others that I am a hard worker and very dedicated. It has also taught me better ways to deal with stress around me and to help others around me deal with their stress in a healthier way.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it allowed me to use all of the skills that I have gained through my years of being a Girl Scout, along with helping me gain new ones, to make a lasting difference in the world. It helped me draw on all of my past experiences and really make the most out of everything that Girl Scouts has taught me.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me become a

-G (Go-getter): by forcing me to do what I needed to do right now and not allowing me time to procrastinate or not try and do something that was needed.

-I (Innovator): by making me come up with ways to describe every step of an artistic process so that even someone who might think he or she isn’t artistic is able to do the same project as everyone else.

-R (Risk Taker): by causing me to step out of my comfort zone with talking to large groups and teachers, even though I knew that there was a chance that no one would want to help me. I also took a risk with doing an art-centered project because many people aren’t interested in the arts or don’t believe that they could do any projects, so I was taking a risk in the possibility that no one would even come to my sessions.

-L (Leader): by making me step into a leadership position and have to become a kind of teacher to the other students in the sessions along with having to come up with all of the projects and getting ready all of the materials that might be needed to do each of the projects.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Buy, sell, or trade Girl Scout materials

Submitted by Tricia Pearson

Metro Denver

Arvada

Does your troop have extra patches, glue, string, or other supplies that you would like to sell or trade for new supplies for the upcoming year? Troop 66517 from Arvada is hosting an event on August 24, 2017 at Campbell Elementary School from 6:30 – 8 p.m. We will have ready made patch kits, as well as swap kits available for purchase. It is $2 to reserve your table space, so text Tricia at (720) 363-3377. Touring is free! This is open to all Girl Scouts and leaders.

Supply Swap Flyer

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Announcing the 2017 Fall Sale Program

How will you kick off another great Girl Scout year? The 2017 Girl Scouts of Colorado Fall Sale Program begins September 23! In-person sales end October 15. Online sales end October 30.

GSCO’s annual Fall Sale Program is a great way for troops to earn startup money for the year. More importantly, the Fall Sale Program helps girls learn The 5 Skills: goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics. Girls can receive rewards for each different part of the sale and all troops also receive 13% of their magazine orders as troop proceeds, plus $1/item for nuts and chocolates.

Learn more about the 2017 Fall Sale Program on the Girl Scouts of Colorado web-site:  http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/cookies/fall-sale.html

Questions? Email us.

 

Zoe’s Silver Award project: Help for the homeless

Submitted by Melissa H.

Pikes Peak

Monument

For Zoe’s Silver Award project, she hand-sewed and filled 60 bags of basic necessities for homeless people in the Colorado Springs/Monument area. Each bag contained a toothbrush, tube of toothpaste, dental floss, deodorant, bar of soap, washcloth, lip balm, granola bar, bottle of water, shampoo, and sunscreen.

Zoe solicited local businesses, family, and friends for donations of all materials.

After sewing and filling the bags, Zoe and her friends and family kept the bags in their cars to hand out to people in need they see along their way.

Everyone associated with this project thought a lot about the many struggles of living out on the streets. There are so many things that we take for granted, but for someone who doesn’t have such basic necessities, they can seem like extravagant luxuries. Even a simple bar of soap can be extremely helpful.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

New activity opportunity in Northern Colorado

Submitted by Hailey Groo

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Girl Scouts of Colorado has partnered with the Poudre Heritage Alliance of the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area to bring a new activity opportunity! Through the Poudre Heritage Alliance’s Community Wellness Program, Girl Scouts can visit the Cache la Poudre River and participate in a super-fun heritage hunt! The available routes stretch from Bellvue to Greeley, and fulfills requirements towards the Brownie Hiker badge! Find out more about the program and sign up your Girl Scout troop at poudreheritage.org/wellness-program.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Service project: The Solitary Bee Hotel

Girl Scouts have a great service opportunity to help build nests for The Solitary Bee Hotel located at Waterton Canyon in Littleton. Girls can build simple bee nests and then install them on July 21, 2017.

The Solitary Bee Hotel project is a community project which will construct a nesting site for solitary bees at the canyon. The Solitary Bee Hotel will be an active nesting site, and will also educate visitors at Waterton Canyon about solitary bees and their importance in the ecosystem.

Solitary bees make up the majority of bees in Colorado (around 70%), and play an important role in the pollination of plants that are in our food chain. Honey bees are well known as pollinators, but in recent years their populations have been in decline. This makes the role of solitary bees as pollinators more important than ever.

Home Depot is partnering with Denver Water and local bee experts at The Bees Waggle (TheBeesWaggle.com) on this project. Local scout groups are being asked to create the solitary bee nesting houses which will then be placed in the hotel structure at the “Grand Opening” event on July 21, 2017.

For more information, contact Philip Cuka at (303) 489-4521 or send email to SolitaryBeeBandB@yahoo.com

 

Top Sellers celebrate at Greeley Stampede

38 Girl Scouts and guests gathered on Saturday, July 1, 2017 at the Greeley Stampede to celebrate Top Sellers who sold 750 packages or more of Girl Scout Cookies during the 2017 Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program. Top Sellers and their guests enjoyed the Stampede’s many attractions and the PRCA Pro Rodeo while also being treated to a BBQ buffet, during which the girls were presented with their Top Seller medallions by the GSCO Product Sales staff. The event was attended by six of the state’s top 100 sellers for the 2017 sale.

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kayleigh Cornell, Aurora, “Colorado Book Bank”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

In my project, Colorado Book Bank, I collected gently used children’s books from families in a local middle school. The middle school’s chapter of National Honor Society helped collect, sort, count, and box the books I collected.  I received even more books from an elementary school after their used book sale, which NJHS helped sort. After taking the books to the food bank I partnered with to give kids a lunch and a book over the summer, I received 1,360 books.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

By counting how many books I donated I determined that I could reach 1,360 kids as each kid got their own lunch and book. While I can’t see how my program affected their education level, I can impact kids right now by giving them a book to read.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

Colorado Book Bank collected books from several different schools. The largest donor was an elementary school who has an existing used book sale that has always searched for a good donor partner to gift their leftover books to each year. I also worked with a local middle school to kick off the project. They are considering the project into another food bank they work with for an existing food drive they already conduct. The elementary school, Peakview, plans to continue donating books to JFS to support the lunchbox program. For the past decade, they have held a spring used book sale with a large number of books left over. The librarian has agreed to donate all leftover children’s book after each book sale to JFS to continue the project. JFS has agreed to pick up the books from the school since that has been the main stumbling block for book donations in the past. Peakview’s librarian also plans to share about the option to donate book sale leftovers to JFS.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

During my project, the chapter of National Honor Society at my school agreed to help move the books to JFS. They also helped me get in touch with the organization as a whole to get my project open on a wider scale. I connected several parts of my project by working with different National Honor Society (NHS) groups. One of the membership requirements of NHS is to provide community service. In support of this work, NHS has a national website that includes a searchable database of project ideas. Club sponsors and student members use the database to find new projects for their club. My project is being listed on that database with a link to my website so other chapters of NHS can create their own Book Bank in their community. In addition, NHS publishes an e-newsletter and have expressed interest in promoting Colorado Book Bank through that publication. Finally, I have created a website to provide supporting documents for other groups who would like to replicate the project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about planning and how while it’s challenging, it has to be done. I also learned that leading a team of other people can be very tricky because you have to pull together the best parts of everyone and make sure all the parts you have work together seamlessly.  I’ve always known I like doing things, but during my project I learned how important it was to delegate tasks to my team to get everything done.  One of the biggest things I learned was that good communication played a key role in my project.  It’s important to ask for help because that is the only way people know you need it and it is important to be clear in written emails and phone calls.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

In the future, I want to be able to lead my own team of scientists and study the formation of planets. I need to be able to work with multiple teams to do this and pull together many different resources to achieve top-notch results from my team. Because of my project, I know how to contact different organizations and pull together people who wouldn’t have worked together otherwise.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I learned so much about myself and how to help others. I wouldn’t have been able to learn the same skills I did if I hadn’t done my Gold Award. I could learn how I could help my community and make a difference beyond what I thought possible.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I became a go-getter because I saw a problem in my community that I wanted to solve, so I found a way that I could start solving it.

I was an innovator because I found a new way to try to start lowering rates of poverty while including people in my community.

A risk-taker meant being able to start something and talk to people that could have become a lot less popular than it actually did. But I wanted to try my project and it paid off in the end.

I became a leader because I created a team of people I relied on as they simultaneously relied on me. I took their strongest skills and combined them to form an amazing project and amazing team.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Colorado Girl Scout license plate will NEVER be retired

Written by Penny Roberts of Estes Park and AnneMarie Harper, Girl Scouts of Colorado Public Relations Director

We have exciting news from the Department of Revenue! The Colorado Girl Scout license plate will never be retired! Earlier this year, the Department of Revenue informed GSCO if 3,000 people had not registered for the plate by July 1, 2018, it would be retired. However, they have since decided that the Colorado Girl Scout license plate will remain whether or not 3,000 people register for it by July 2018.

The cost is $50 above the regular license plate fees and the plate can be registered to any type of vehicle, including motorcycles. Put them on your motorhome, scooter, new car, or vintage classic. Even Dad’s Plumbing Co. can put Girl Scout plates on his entire fleet of vehicles!  Girl Scout plates can be put on a currently registered vehicle after a transfer.  Also, Girl Scout plates can be transferred from one vehicle to another under the same ownership.

Get started at the Department of Revenue’s website: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dmv/node/40131/ You can also request Girl Scout plates at your County Clerk’s office, and they will be shipped directly to you from the State in just a few days.

The Girl Scout license plate was created in 2010 and 2011 by a Promise Partners alumnae task force as part of the 100th Anniversary celebration of Girl Scouts of the USA. It has since been available for purchase by anyone who wishes to celebrate and publicize the legacy and continuing efforts of Girl Scouts of Colorado.

Get your Colorado Girl Scout license plates today and we promise to wave at you when we see you go by!

Questions? Contact Penny Roberts at probertscolo@gmail.com or (970) 586-1775 for additional information.