Category Archives: Council News

33 Colorado Girl Scouts earn Gold Award, the Highest Honor in Girl Scouts

In the face of the global coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Girl Scouts continue to do all they can to make our world a better place by taking action to address issues facing their local communities. There are no better examples of this Girl Scout spirit and resiliency than the 33 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, between March 2, 2020, and March 1, 2021. They include:

  • Aarzoo Aggarwal from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, created a program called Girls are SMART (Scientists, Mathematicians, Astronomers, Researchers, Talented), during which she led a group of elementary school girls to make art utilizing STEM topics. They made chromatography butterflies, constellation boards, salt watercolor painting, painted pinecones, and drip art. After each project, they discussed the science behind the project
  • Sidney Barbier from Steamboat Springs, Steamboat Mountain School, tackled the issues of waste and recycling, particularly at Colorado state parks. She designed signage for state parks, hosted events to educate others about waste diversion, and even created a Junior Ranger curriculum.
  • Charlotte Blish from Arvada, Arvada West High School, started a nonprofit, Watering Communities, to teach elementary-aged students about how the lack of clean water impacts socio-economic and education resources in developing countries.
  • Clare Bolon from Longmont, Apex Homeschool Enrichment Program, developed and taught a week-long online course about how to write and read cursive. She also created resources to help students continue to practice their cursive after completing the course.
  • Gayathri Budamgunta from Longmont, Niwot High School, took action to address the issue of low self-esteem and body image in middle school students ages 11-13. In doing so, she created a program called “Warm and Fuzzies,” giving students a way to connect to each other through meaningful notes/letters that they write to one another while engaging in positive reinforcements.
  • Megan Burns from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created a website and social media presence where artists could share work created during, or inspired by, the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Lauren Butler from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, took action when she saw library books and textbooks being thrown away because schools are switching to digital libraries and e-textbooks. She collected more than 3,000 of those books and delivered them to multiple places in need, while creating a pipeline of book donations that will continue to supply books around the world.
  • Safiya Dhunna from Aurora, Grandview High School, addressed the lack of education for fourth and fifth graders on the importance of e-recycling by developing a curriculum to be integrated into the STEM program at an elementary school in her community.
  • Katie Ellenberger from Colorado Springs, Vista Ridge High School, created a space for students at Timberview Middle School to learn how to play the piano or express themselves. She also started the Painted Pianos Club and a school-wide design contest, where the students could come up with the design to paint on the pianos.
  • Kayla Fairweather from Parker, Ponderosa High School, developed a video curriculum on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) to supplement the T1D training that teachers currently receive. It features the perspectives of diabetic students, parents, a professional athlete with T1D, an endocrinologist, and a diabetes resource nurse.
  • Inspired by her own experience with bullying, Lily Goudreau from Monument, Lewis Palmer High School, wanted to encourage self-confidence and self-worth in middle school students. She did this by painting positive affirmations around a local school and worked with the no-bully club to maintain and add to the affirmations each year. She also created a “lunch bunch” group that helps watch out for bullying and does not allow any student to eat alone.
  • Elizabeth Gumper from Colorado Springs, Coronado High School, created a rich online resource website, mycareerconnections.com, that gives high school students a personal, insightful look at numerous careers available throughout society through personal interviews with professionals.
  • Zoe Johnson from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, created a handbook, video, and training program about horse care and safety to educate new or inexperienced horse owners, as well as barn staff at summer camps.
  • Kaitlyn Ketchell from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, addressed the lack of education and awareness about eating disorders; namely, warning signs and seeking treatment, as well as general education about eating disorders by creating new curriculum and materials for local middle and high schools, as well as medical establishments (clinics, pharmacies, etc.)
  • Breanna Lewis from Colorado Springs, Rampart High School, led online sewing classes. Attendees not only learned how to sew, but made pillowcase dresses to be delivered by missionaries to developing countries.
  • Beatrice Lin from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, developed a workshop and handbook for Girl Scout Daisies and Brownies called “Bringing Global to Girls” (BGtG). The goal is to help younger Girl Scouts develop a sense of connection to the rest of the world and appreciation for other cultures.
  • Ellie McWhirter from Denver, East High School, developed a series of educational materials, including a website, to decrease plastic bag use in her community and increase the knowledge of plastic bag pollution.
  • Isabella Mendoza from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a cheap and sustainable habitat for solitary bees to lay eggs in and distributed more than 350 habitats around Colorado and the world. She also hosted a community event for people to make their own habitat.
  • Katelyn Miller from Centennial, Grandview High School, created a website dedicated to helping veterans experiencing homelessness. It includes resources on how to help veterans experiencing homelessness, resources for them, as well as interviews with veterans.
  • With the help of local Girl Scout troops, Ashlyn Morrill from Parker, Chaparral High School, created a pollinator garden that attracts various pollinators, including hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, etc. Girl Scouts learned the importance of pollinators and were inspired to do their part to help conserve the pollinator populations.
  • Opal Mosbarger from Peyton, Falcon High School, addressed the issue of animal displacement during emergency situations. She collected kennels and blankets for Perfect Fit Wellness Center, so people can keep their pets safe during natural disasters and other emergencies.
  • Wren Murzyn from Fort Collins, Poudre High School, partnered with doctors, nutritionists, and others to create a comprehensive guidebook to assist individuals who want to get healthy, but don’t know where to start.
  • Meredith Neid from Denver, George Washington High School, started a self-care club at her high school to healthily address rising levels of stress amongst her peers. After the start of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, she adapted her project to include Zoom conversations with high school seniors about processing the pandemic and what it means to grow up during this time.
  • To address the gender gap in STEM fields, Catherine Pederson from Colorado Springs, Cheyenne Mountain High School, created a website with multiple resources and biographies of model female scientists.
  • Anna Rahn from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created 17 STEM activities for schools and after-school programs. Due to the pandemic, she was unable to distribute them to local schools, so she developed a website where PDFs of the activities are available.
  • Peyton Roeder from Erie, Colorado Early Colleges Fort Collins, created the A Bright Spot program to provide children experiencing homelessness with birthday parties. The program enlists volunteers to provide all birthday party supplies through the Beyond Home program.
  • Giada Rosch from Arvada, Westminster High School, created 50 sensory bags and resources for local organizations. She also created a sensory training program to improve customer service at various venues so that all people can enjoy a variety of activities with a few simple accommodations.
  • Brittney Smith from Colorado Springs created an annual art show tradition at Air Academy High School to showcase student art. Art that is featured targets a worldwide issue or a controversial perspective, allowing people to connect with others through their similarities and differences, and open people’s perspectives on a worldwide issue.
  • Bethany Taullie from La Junta, Swink High School, started the Bethany´s Birthday in a Bag program to make sure children in her community received a present and enjoyed a cake on their birthday. She collected items (including cake mix, frosting, crafts, stuffed animals, games, and more) and assembled 100 birthday bags, which were distributed to elementary schools and foster care systems in her community
  • Inspired by her own experiences as a foster child, Katie Wilson from Longmont, Mead High School, collected more than 100 books for the foster care visitation rooms at the visitation center in Boulder County. The books will allow parents and children to connect when they are in out of home placement.

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the mark of the truly remarkable— earned only by a high school Girl Scout who works to address an issue she’s passionate about in a way that produces meaningful and lasting change. Whether it’s on a local, national, or global level, Gold Award Girl Scouts provide innovative solutions to significant challenges. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls are entitled to enlist at a higher pay grade if they join the military.

“Gold Award Girl Scouts don’t just change the world for the better, they change it for good—and these Girl Scouts embody everything this achievement stands for,” said Leanna Clark, chief executive officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “Each of these young women addressed an issue that’s important to her in order to earn her Gold Award, and we congratulate each of these Gold Award Girl Scouts on this momentous accomplishment.”

Each year, Gold Award Girl Scouts are eligible to earn the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. This award was made possible through a generous gift to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado’s former President and CEO Stephanie A. Foote. Elizabeth Gumper is the 2021 Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize winner and will receive $1,000 cash gift to recognize her sustainable impact through leadership. Charlotte Blish was named Honorable Mention and will receive a $250 cash prize. “I am proud to recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

In addition, the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award is given in memory of Girl Scout Gold Award Mentor Debbie Haskins, who had a passion for working with older Girl Scouts. It recognizes one outstanding Gold Award Girl Scout from Colorado who exemplifies the Girl Scout spirit through courage, confidence, and character. Lily Goudreau is recognized with this year’s Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award for her confidence, resilience, and courage in succeeding in life.

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

2021 Gold Award Scholarship Ceremony

Girl Scouts of Colorado CEO Leanna Clark presented the 2021 Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award and the 2021 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize to Gold Award Girl Scouts on April 5, 2021. Watch it here. This year’s ceremony was a virtual celebration due to COVID-19. In past years, this special ceremony has been part of Gold Award Day at the Colorado State Capitol.

  • Inspired by her own experience with bullying, Lily Goudreau from Monument, Lewis Palmer High School, wanted to encourage self-confidence and self-worth in middle school students. She did this by painting positive affirmations around a local school and worked with the no-bully club to maintain and add to the affirmations each year. She also created a “lunch bunch” group that helps watch out for bullying and does not allow any student to eat alone. Lily is recognized with this year’s Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award for her confidence, resilience, and courage in succeeding in life.
  • Elizabeth Gumper from Colorado Springs, Coronado High School, created a rich online resource website, mycareerconnections.com, that gives high school students a personal, insightful look at numerous careers available throughout society through personal interviews with professionals. Elizabeth is the 2021 Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize winner and will receive $1,000 cash gift to recognize her sustainable impact through leadership.
  • Charlotte Blish from Arvada, Arvada West High School, started a nonprofit, Watering Communities, to teach elementary-aged students about how the lack of clean water impacts socio-economic and education resources in developing countries. Charlotte was named 2021 Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize Honorable Mention and will receive a $250 cash prize for her project’s impact.

Each year, Gold Award Girl Scouts are eligible to earn the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. This award was made possible through a generous gift to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Endowment by former Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “I am proud to recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

In addition, the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award is given in memory of Girl Scout Gold Award Mentor Debbie Haskins, who had a passion for working with older Girl Scouts. It recognizes one outstanding Gold Award Girl Scout from Colorado who exemplifies the Girl Scout spirit through courage, confidence, and character.

“Gold Award Girl Scouts don’t just change the world for the better, they change it for good—and these Girl Scouts embody everything this achievement stands for,” said Leanna Clark, Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “Each of these young women addressed an issue that’s important to her in order to earn her Gold Award, and we congratulate each of these Gold Award Girl Scouts on this momentous accomplishment.”

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Be sure to join us on the GSCO Facebook page on May 16 for a virtual, statewide Highest Awards Celebration honoring Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts from the past Girl Scout Awards Program year. Aren’t on Facebook? That’s OK. Email highestawards@gscolorado.org for an alternate link.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Buy a Box of Joy for Hometown Heroes: Every donation of Girl Scout Cookies supports girls’ success

Girl Scouts of Colorado is excited to offer a new opportunity for Coloradans to honor hometown heroes in their community while supporting Girl Scouts in Focus on Abilities, a multi-intensive program for Girl Scouts with learning, behavioral, mental, and physical disabilities led by GSCO Outreach staff. Between now and the end of the Girl Scout Cookie Program on March 21, 2021, you can go to the Girl Scouts of Colorado website and purchase packages of cookies to be donated to educators, first responders, health care workers, food banks, and military personnel. After the Cookie Program ends, Girl Scouts of Colorado will deliver a mix of Girl Scout Cookies to these hometown heroes on your behalf.

“It really is a win-win-win! With your support, Girl Scouts can fund their next adventure and we’ll deliver the cookies to hometown heroes to enjoy the sweet taste of ‘normal’ everyone is craving right now!” said Leanna Clark, Girl Scouts of Colorado chief executive officer.

Girl Scouts in the Focus on Abilities program are children with multiple disabilities who have used the money raised through the Cookie Program to fund field trips and other experiences, like adaptive horseback riding. The K-12 special needs Girl Scout group at Fletcher Miller School in Lakewood has participated in the cookie program for 20 years using some of their proceeds to fund adaptive equipment for the classroom.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

More In-Person Meeting Options for Girl Scout Troops

Girl Scouts of Colorado is excited to share an update from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment that will allow for more options for Girl Scout troops to meet in person.

We have been working with state officials throughout the past year regarding COVID-19 guidelines. As positivity levels change and more of the population becomes vaccinated, the CDPHE has been able to re-evaluate the guidance they provided.

The state previously classified Girl Scout troop meetings as “personal gatherings,” but now only meetings or activities occurring in a private residence fall under the ”personal gatherings” category. This means Girl Scout troops have more options to meet in person as long as they follow the guidelines for indoor events, outdoor events, or outdoor recreation, depending on the location and activity planned for the meeting. Be sure to check the state and county guidelines, but in most cases, this means a hike, a get-together in a park, or a meeting at a neighborhood clubhouse may be options for you. However, Girl Scout troops cannot meet in a private residence, whether the meeting is held indoors or outside.

Safety is always No. 1 priority and we stress that troops must follow all safety guidelines and take the responsibility of ensuring their activities are aligned with the safety standards for the activity and location.

Always check with the location or business before hosting a meeting or activity to ensure you are within capacity limits for that location and ensure you follow all safety guidelines associated with that business or activity.

At this time, overnights are not allowed per GSUSA for our state’s current phase of reopening. We continue to work on this with the state to determine what requirements will be in place once overnights are allowed again.

We appreciate your patience as we’ve all tried to navigate these challenging and ever-changing times while making safety a top priority.

Visit girlscoutsofcolorado.org/covid for the most up-to-date information. You can also use this document  to help you navigate where your activity might be categorized.

Learn More

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts of Colorado CEO Inducted into 40 Under 40 Hall of Fame

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to announce that Chief Executive Officer Leanna Clark is the 2021 inductee into the Denver Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 Hall of Fame. Leanna, along with this year’s class of 40 Under 40 award recipients, will be honored during the Denver Business Journal’s virtual awards program on May 4.

In 1998, Leanna was named to the list of 40 Under 40, honoring up-and-coming Denver leaders. Now as an inductee to the 40 Under 40 Hall of Fame, Leanna joins Colorado Gov. Jared Polis, who was the DBJ’s inaugural Hall of Fame inductee in 2020, in this prestigious group of leaders who have accomplished much and still have their greatest contributions ahead of them.

As Leanna took the reins at GSCO in May 2020, the organization was responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and developed a wide variety of virtual programming so girls could continue on their Girl Scout Leadership Experience journey. With Leanna’s leadership and community connections, Girl Scouts of Colorado extended its diversity, equity, and inclusion badge work beyond Girl Scouts to families and community members, and took the lead on a series of roundtable discussions about race. Now in the midst of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, she continues to help girls find new and innovative ways to safely reach their cookie goals and learn essential life skills.

Additionally, making a difference in her community, being an advocate for girls and women, and championing female ambition have long been traits Leanna values. She was named a Woman of Distinction by Girl Scouts of Colorado in 2009, co-chaired the signature event in 2014, and has remained well-connected to the network of amazing women. She’s also served on the boards of the DPS Foundation, Colorado Music Hall of Fame, Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Volunteers of America, the Red Cross and many others.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

In the face of the global coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Girl Scouts continue to do all they can to make our world a better place by taking action to address issues facing their local communities. There are no better examples of this Girl Scout spirit and resiliency than the 16 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who recently earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting. They include:

  • Sidney Barbier from Steamboat Springs, Steamboat Mountain School, tackled the issues of waste and recycling, particularly at Colorado state parks. She designed signage for state parks, hosted events to educate others about waste diversion, and even created a Junior Ranger curriculum.
  • Charlotte Blish from Arvada, Arvada West High School, started a nonprofit, Watering Communities, to teach elementary-aged students about how the lack of clean water impacts socio-economic and education resources in parts of Africa.
  • Clare Bolon from Longmont, Apex Homeschool Enrichment Program, developed and taught a week-long online course about how to write and read cursive. She also created resources to help students continue to practice their cursive after completing the course.
  • Kayla Fairweather from Parker, Ponderosa High School, developed a video curriculum on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) to supplement the T1D training that teachers currently receive. It features the perspectives of diabetic students, parents, a professional athlete with T1D, an endocrinologist, and a diabetes resource nurse.
  • Zoe Johnson from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, created a handbook and video about horse care and safety to educate new or inexperienced horse owners, as well as barn staff at summer camps.
  • Beatrice Lin from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, developed a workshop and handbook for Girl Scout Daisies and Brownies called “Bringing Global to Girls” (BGtG). The goal is to help younger Girl Scouts develop a sense of connection to the rest of the world and appreciation for other cultures.
  • Ellie McWhirter from Denver, East High School, developed a series of educational materials, including a website, to decrease plastic bag usage in her community and increase the knowledge of plastic bag pollution.
  • Isabella Mendoza from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a cheap and sustainable habitat for solitary bees to lay eggs in and distributed more than 350 habitats around Colorado and the world. She also hosted a community event for people to make their own habitat.
  • With the help of local Girl Scout troops, Ashlyn Morrill from Parker, Chaparral High School, created a pollinator garden that attracts various pollinators, including hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, etc. Girls learned the importance of pollinators and were inspired to do their part to help conserve the pollinator populations.
  • Opal Mosbarger from Peyton, Falcon High School, addressed the issue of animal displacement during emergency situations. She collected kennels and blankets for Perfect Fit Wellness Center, so people can keep their pets safe during natural disasters and other emergencies.
  • Wren Murzyn from Fort Collins, Poudre High School, partnered with doctors, nutritionists, and others to create a guidebook to assist individuals who are wanting to get healthy, but don’t know where to start.
  • Meredith Neid from Denver, George Washington High School, started a self-care club at her high school to healthily address rising levels of stress amongst her peers. After the start of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, she adapted her project to include Zoom conversations with high school seniors about processing the pandemic and what it means to grow up during this time.
  • Anna Rahn from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created 17 STEM activities for schools and after-school programs. Due to the pandemic, she was unable to distribute them to local schools, so she developed a website where PDFs of the activities are available.

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the mark of the truly remarkable— earned only by a high school Girl Scout who works to address an issue she’s passionate about in a way that produces meaningful and lasting change. Whether it’s on a local, national, or global level, Gold Award Girl Scouts provide innovative solutions to significant challenges. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls are entitled to enlist at a higher pay grade if they join the military.

“Gold Award Girl Scouts don’t just change the world for the better, they change it for good—and these Girl Scouts embody everything this achievement stands for,” said Leanna Clark, Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “Each of these young women addressed an issue that’s important to her in order to earn her Gold Award, and we congratulate each of these Gold Award Girl Scouts on this momentous accomplishment.”

You can learn more about these Gold Award Girl Scouts and their projects on the Girl Scouts of Colorado blog.

Support Girl Scouts of Colorado and Schedule Your Colorado Gives Day Donation NOW

Year-round, you support our efforts to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. On December 8, 2020, you can make your gift go even further. Colorado Gives Day is an annual statewide effort to celebrate and increase philanthropy through online giving. To make giving even easier, schedule your donation TODAY by using this link: https://www.coloradogives.org/index.php?section=organizations&action=newDonation&fwID=6854 

By supporting Girl Scouts of Colorado on Colorado Gives Day, your donation dollars go further than they would on any other day of the year. That’s because the FirstBank Incentive Fund increases all donations made on December 8! Every nonprofit receiving a donation on Colorado Gives Day receives a portion of the incentive fund, which increases the value of every dollar donated.

Schedule your donation today or give on December 8 at https://www.coloradogives.org/index.php?section=organizations&action=newDonation&fwID=6854.  Once you do, share one of these two images on your social media accounts and be sure to tag Girl Scouts of Colorado on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

 

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Updated public health order affects troop gatherings

On Oct. 23, Gov. Polis and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) amended its Safer at Home public health order to limit personal gatherings in all counties at all Safer at Home levels. The revised order reduces the size of personal gatherings to no more than 10 people from no more than two separate households. Girl Scout troop meetings are considered “personal gatherings” and are affected by this public health order. You can find your county’s level here. At this time, the public health order affects all but four Colorado counties.

Girl Scouts of Colorado reached out to officials with CDPHE to determine how the amended order affects troop activities. These are the answers they provided.

Larger Girl Scout events, such as a service unit event, only qualify as “outdoor or indoor events” if they are intended for and open to the community.

Girl Scout troops can attend events or activities at a business in accordance with the rules and regulations for the business. Businesses are under separate regulations and can also set their own rules and regulations that are stricter than the state or county. We recommend if you are hosting activities or events at a business, you should contact the business to confirm their rules and share their plan to ensure the business is fine with the group size, mask requirements, etc. For instance a business may decide that a group gathering is a personal gathering and apply those rules of no more than 10 people from no more than two separate households in a party.

We know it’s disappointing not to be able to meet in-person, but it’s also important to follow the public health order and each of us must to do our part to curb the spread of COVID-19.  There is a wide variety of online programming available and tips to help your troop stay connected even when we cannot gather in person. Please reach out to your VSS if you need help setting up virtual programming for your troop.

Please see the COVID page on our website and the COVID FAQs for the most up-to-date information.

Colorado wildfires – how you can help

 

When disaster strikes Girl Scouts want to reach out and make a difference to those affected and the current situation with wildfires in Colorado is no different. Your Girl Scout or troop may want to start a clothing or food drive, but that may not be what most people need. In fact, relief workers have said the time it takes to accept, sort through, and distribute all that stuff often gets in the way of the most important relief efforts.

We encourage you to instead consider making a gift to an organization helping with disaster relief. GSUSA has lifted the fundraising restriction to enable girls to raise money for Girl Scout recovery efforts at Girl Scouts of Colorado.

GSCO understands that many are already stretched thin, emotionally and financially due to the pandemic and are unable to contribute finically. But you can still help! Girl Scouts can send letters of thanks and support to firefighters and first responders working to combat the fires. You can mail cards for Girl Scouts affected by the fires to our Northern Colorado office, 2725 Rocky Mountain Ave., Suite 420, Loveland, CO 80538, and we will make sure they get to troops in the area. You can also post banners or signs at your home and/or on your social media networks.

Though it’s not safe for community volunteer projects related to the fire yet, United Way will post volunteer opportunities online at www.NoCoVolunteers.org when they do become available.

GSUSA has also produced a Disaster Response Booklet for Girl Scouts and troops.

Below is a list of some organizations you can make monetary donations to

The United Way has also started a page and a donation Amazon list

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/homepage/ref=smi_se_cl_rd_ge?orig=%2Fhz%2Fcharitylist%2Fls%2F32XYQIYVV3BI4%2Fref%3Dsmi_ext_lnk_lcl_cl%3FpldnSite%3D1

https://www.larimerhumane.org/blog/cameron-peak-fire-information-page/

https://www.gofundme.com/f/emergency-supplies-noco-evacuated-livestock?utm_source=customer&

  • The Ranch Events Center is accepting donations of grass hay to help with large animal shelter. Call Maggie Steely at 970-619-4009 first to donate.

 

  • Volunteers of America: To donate to Volunteers of America, which has been helping with pre-evacuation calls for the Cameron Peak Fire, visit voa.org.

 

 

 

Activity Approval Form

At the beginning of each Girl Scouting year, Girl Scouts of Colorado and Girl Scouts of the USA review our volunteer/program policies, Volunteer Essentials, and our safety policies, Safety Activity Checkpoints. These resources are here to not only communicate our policies, but to ensure every adult member and girl are prepared and safe. It is the expectation of every volunteer to review these resources every year. The 2020 version of Safety Activity Checkpoints includes a new section on key components of an Emergency Action Plan, clarification of which activities require approval by GSCO and updated guidelines on general Girl Scout program safety.

In the same light of ensuring girl safety, we have a new process at Girl Scouts of Colorado for council approval for activities, events, and trips held by troops and service units. The Activity and Event Approval Form must be completed at least 30 days prior to your event, activity or trip. Activities that require prior approval include any:

  • Troop or service unit hosting a money earning event or activity.
  • Troop or group overnight or travel experience.
  • High-risk activity that requires approval per the Safety Activity Checkpoints.

This new process for Activity and Event Approval goes into effect for any activities taking place after December 15, 2020.

What are Safety Activity Checkpoints?

Safety Activity Checkpoints (SAC) is a resource that provides safety standards and guidelines for general Girl Scout programs and specific activity areas. SAC includes information on required volunteer certification, adult volunteer to girl participant ratios, emergency plan templates and guidelines for specific activities. SAC includes activity chapters on everything from bicycling to camping to horseback riding to rock climbing! Each activity chapter includes a resources to help troops plan the activity and specific safety guidelines around equipment, instructor experience/training, limited to Girl Scout program levels that can participate and if approval from GSCO is required before your troop or Girl Scout group can do the activity. You can review the 2020 version of Safety Activity Checkpoints here!

Why do some activities require approval by GCSO?

In Girl Scouts we want to ensure that girls are participating in activities that are developmentally appropriate, progressive, and of course safe. By requiring the approval of some of the more “high-risk” activities girls can participate in, Girl Scouts of Colorado can make sure the group has the proper insurance, have taken the necessary leader training, is taking the necessary safety precautions, and is properly prepared for the activity. It is in no way meant to limit a girls experience, rather our goal is the increase the amount of fun, safe experiences girls can participate in.

What is the activity and event approval form? How do I know if my activity needs approval?

This is a form that troops, Service Units and other Girl Scout groups in Girl Scouts of Colorado will need to complete 30 days prior to any activity that needs approval. Activities that require approval are:

  • Any troop or service unit hosting a money earning event or activity.
  • Any overnight or travel experience.
  • Any high-risk activity that requires approval per the Safety Activity Checkpoints. You can determine if your activity needs approval by reading the activity specific chapter, or by looking at the “Activities at a Glance” chart on p. 21 of Safety Activity Checkpoints

What is the timeline for activity approval and how will I know I am approved?

Please complete the form 30 days prior to your activity. Depending on the type of activity you are planning, you may not need to wait for additional GSCO approval after your submission. Upon completion of the form you will receive an email indicating if additional staff approval will be required for your activity. If additional approval is required, you will be connected via email from a GSCO staff notifying you of your approval within 10 business days of your submission.

Still have questions? Reach out to us at inquiry@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.