Category Archives: Council News

Girl Scouts announces 2018 Denver Metro Women of Distinction: 10 Extraordinary women honored

This year’s honorees were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Tasha Jones, Woman of Distinction ‘15, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. They are shining examples of corporate, civic and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow. The Women of Distinction program brings together a group of women dedicated to raising support for Girl Scout leadership programs.

  • Janine Davidson, President, Metropolitan State University of Denver
  • Ruth Fountain Eide, Community Leader
  • Therese Ellery, Senior Program Officer, Aging Program, Rose Community Foundation
  • Gretchen Hammer, Medicaid Director, Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing
  • Peggy E. Jennings, CPA, Partner, Eide Bailly LLP
  • Lisa Zúñiga Ramirez, Principal, Senior Portfolio Manager, Segall Bryant & Hamill
  • Meshach Rhoades, Partner, Armstrong Teasdale LLP
  • Terri Richardson, MD, Kaiser Permanente Colorado
  • Tinesha Ross, Government and Commercial Programs, Manager, System Safety & Quality, United Launch Alliance
  • Becky Takeda-Tinker, Ph.D., President & CEO of Colorado State University-Global Campus; and CEO of Beyond Campus Innovations, Inc. an entity of the CSU System Foundation

Girl Scouts of Colorado will welcome the Class of 2018 honorees with a private reception on June 21, 2018 at the Colorado Auto Dealers Association from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The celebration concludes with the Thin Mint Dinner on October 2, 2018 at Denver Marriott Tech Center from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. The event includes Thin Mint Cocktails and dessert made with Thin Mints, three-course meal, and event program. Event co-chairs are Brook Kramer, Senior VP, Senior Regional Fiduciary Manager, Philanthropic Services, Wells Fargo Private Bank, Woman of Distinction ‘16 and Pat Cortez, Senior VP, Community Affairs Manager, Community Relations and CRA Risk Management Department, Wells Fargo Government and Community Relations Group, Woman of Distinction ’04.

For information regarding tickets and sponsorships, visit girlscoutsofcolorado.org/woddenver or contact Heidi Books at 303-607-4833 or at heidi.books@gscolorado.org.

 

Girl Scouts announces 2018 Western Slope Women of Distinction: Three extraordinary women honored

This year’s honorees were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Sue Conry, Woman of Distinction ‘17, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. They are shining examples of corporate, civic, and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow.

  • Sister Barbara Aldrich SCL, VP of Mission Integration, St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center
  • Jeni Brown, Chief Financial Officer, J.G. Management Systems, Inc.
  • LeAnn Zetmeir, Philanthropist and Community Leader

Since 2013, including this year’s honorees, Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 18 women on the Western Slope as Women of Distinction. The Women of Distinction program brings together a group of women dedicated to raising funds to support Girl Scout leadership programs.

Girl Scouts of Colorado will publicly honor these inductees on Nov. 8, 2018 at the annual Women of Distinction Breakfast. This year’s event will be held at the Two Rivers Convention Center. The 2018 Event Chair is Stacey Mascarenas, Woman of Distinction ’17.

Event Sponsor: Gold Presenting Sponsor, US Bank.

For information regarding tickets and sponsorships, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/wodgj or contact Cindi Graves at 970-628-8003 or cindi.graves@gscolorado.org.

 

 

You can help all girls have the Girl Scout Experience

As a Girl Scout volunteer or parent, you see the value of Girl Scouting every day. At Girl Scouts of Colorado, we believe that every girl deserves the chance to be a Girl Scout, to have amazing experiences, to do things she wouldn’t otherwise do, and to become the best she can be.

A family’s resources should not be a barrier to a girl’s future success.

Girl Scouts of Colorado awards more than $125,000 annually in Opportunity Grants for families in need. Grants can support membership dues, uniforms and books, costs to attend camp or events, training fees for adult volunteers, and more.

Named after Girl Scout founder Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low, Daisy’s Circle is Girl Scouts of Colorado’s monthly giving program. Funds raised through Daisy’s Circle are available to families who need a little help so that their girls can fully participate in the Girl Scout Experience.

Whether you are already a Daisy’s Circle member or you become one today, you have the opportunity to double the impact of your support. Thanks to a generous match challenge made by lifetime Girl Scout and GSCO Board member Kathy Ambrose, all new Daisy’s Circle monthly donations or increases to existing monthly donations will be matched, up to $25,000.

This offer ends May 31, 2018 so act now to maximize your support!

Join now or learn more about Daisy’s Circle and how you can help.

Why wait? Join now and take advantage of new extended year membership

New girls and volunteers are invited to join Girl Scouts now with the new extended year membership offer! Now when you sign your girl up for Girl Scouts this spring or summer, you can take advantage of the new extended year membership offer and get 17 months of Girl Scouts for $35 (new members only).

Now’s a great time to start a new troop! With the extended year membership, you can get your new troop going right now.  There’s no better way to kick off a great Girl Scout adventure then by starting off with some outdoor spring and summer fun! When school  opens up next fall, your girls will already have formed friendships, tried new things, and be ready to keep their Girl Scout journey going.

Troop leaders: It’s a great time to add new girls to your troop! Any new girls who sign up can purchase an extended year membership, join the troop on your spring and summer activities and keep the adventure going next fall.

 

GSCO Retail Shop update: April 2018

The GSCO Retail Shop will have new merchandise in stock for all our Girl Scout Ambassadors out there who are ready to graduate! They can walk down that graduation aisle beaming with Girl Scout pride for all of their accomplishments.  You can order these items online or come in to the retail shop and purchase.

Also, summer is around the corner and camps will be in full swing. Don’t forget that there will be no trading posts at Tomahawk Ranch this year, but we do have a pre-order form for Tomahawk swag and camp kits. Sky High Ranch will have their trading post up and running, but there is also a pre-order form.

https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/2018_skyhigh_camp_preorder_form

https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/2018_tomahawk_camp_preorder_form

Staff at the retail shop will contact you and get a form of payment and your shipping request.

Please remember cookie cards are only available to use through Girl Scouts of Colorado and not available to use online at girlscoutshop.com.  However, if you would like to purchase online, you can do so using your own credit card and submit a form for reimbursement.

http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/for-volunteers/forms-and-resources/credit-reimbursement0.html

The last Saturday of the spring season will be May 19, 2018. After that, summer hours start on May 22. We have an amazing retail team, and we are here to make our volunteers/members happy, confident and to represent Girl Scouts to their full potential.

Girl Scouts of Colorado Provide Trees for Forest Restoration

Submitted by Ryan Lockwood,  External and Media Communications Specialist for the Colorado State Forest Service

As part of a budding partnership between the two organizations, the Colorado State Forest Service has received a donation from the Girl Scouts of Colorado to provide 7,500 seedling trees to be used for reforestation efforts in Colorado.

The donation, made to the CSFS-administered Restoring Colorado’s Forests Fund, will be used to provide seedlings for planting in areas impacted by wildfires, floods or other disasters, and that are critical to water protection and wildlife habitat. The number of trees was chosen to honor each of the approximately 7,500 Girl Scout volunteers statewide.

The timing of the gift this month coincides with today being National Arbor Day and last week being National Volunteer Week; this year, in lieu of individual gifts typically given to its volunteers, Girl Scouts of Colorado instead chose to invest in the seedling trees.

“Girl Scouts of Colorado volunteers give their time, energy and, most importantly, their heart to making Girl Scouts a great experience for girls and that has a lasting and positive impact,” said Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “In recognition of all the amazing things that these volunteers do, we chose the gift of trees that will also have a lasting and positive impact by helping to restore forested areas in our beautiful state.”

Mike Lester, state forester and CSFS director, said that the goal is for this to be the beginning of a long-lasting organizational partnership between Girl Scouts of Colorado and the CSFS. As part of a collaborative arrangement, the agency is helping Girl Scouts gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of trees and forests in Colorado, initially through increased participation in an annual CSFS-led Scout Day, tours of the CSFS Nursery and educational materials designed specifically for youth.

“We see clear parallels between our mission to achieve stewardship of Colorado’s forests and the mission of the Girl Scouts of Colorado to prepare our youth for leadership,” said Lester. “Both of our organizations have the potential to mature and shape our collective future in positive ways.”

Those interested in volunteering or making donations to help conserve and restore Colorado’s forests can go to csfs.colostate.edu for opportunities and information. To make a donation directly to the Restoring Colorado’s Forests Fund, visit https://advancing.colostate.edu/RestoringColoradosForests.

***

The Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) provides professional forestry assistance, wildfire mitigation expertise and outreach and education to help landowners and communities achieve their forest management goals. The CSFS is a service and outreach agency of the Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University and provides staffing for the Division of Forestry within the Colorado Department of Natural Resources. For more information, visit csfs.colostate.edu.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong – more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

 

 

May 1 Gold Award proposal deadline for graduating seniors

Starting in 2017, Girl Scouts of Colorado implemented a May 1 deadline for graduating seniors to submit their Gold Award project proposals. This means that any girl who is graduating from high school has until May 1 (annually) to submit her Gold Award project proposal via the Go Gold website. After May 1, girls who are graduating from high school will no longer be eligible to earn their Gold Award if they have not already submitted a project proposal.

Colorado lawmakers honor Gold Award Girl Scouts

On Monday, April 9, 2018, Colorado State Representatives broke from traditional business to honor 40 Gold Award Girl Scouts from across Colorado. More than half of this year’s honorees were at this recognition, which took place shortly after the session opened at 10 a.m. To earn the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, each of these young women completed a large-scale project that solves a community problem not only in the short-term, but for years into the future. By doing so, they’ve gained extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

In addition to honoring these Girl Scouts and their extraordinary Gold Award projects that benefited communities across the world, Girl Scouts of Colorado introduced the winners of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize and the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award. Riley Morgenthaler from Morrison received the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. She created Creativity Tool Tubs to help close the gap that students living in low-resource areas face when participating in the STEM-based activity, Destination Imagination. The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “Riley’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

Riley was honored along with one other Gold Award Girl Scout, whom the selection committee for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize determined was deserving of Honorable Mention. Marieke van Erven from Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.

Elizabeth Hoelscher from Aurora was named the first recipient of the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award. She partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage survivors of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls. This award is given in memory of Girl Scout Gold Award Mentor Debbie Haskins, who had a passion for working with older Girl Scouts. It recognizes one outstanding Gold Award Girl Scout from Colorado who exemplifies the Girl Scout spirit through courage, confidence, and character.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Foote. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership are making the world a better place.”

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

The following Colorado Girl Scouts are among the 40 statewide who will be receiving the prestigious Gold Award for the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards year:

  • Losing a close family friend to testicular cancer inspired Geneva Ascher from Breckenridge, Summit High School, to teach young people how to properly perform self breast and testicular exams. The lesson plans she created and delivered to her classmates will continue to be used by her school.
  • Meg Bleylefrom Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, worked to increase the bee population by teaching children about how people need and depend on bees.
  • Beth Bolonfrom Longmont hosted a workshop for sixth through ninth grade girls to help them improve their communication skills and bolster their confidence when interacting with others.
  • Cheyanne Bridgesfrom Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with the Pikes Peak Humane Society to support their animal medical fund by providing a sustainable source of donations from her school.
  • Tara Butlerfrom Denver, Overland High School, created a course and curriculum specifically for senior citizens to educate them on how to use their smartphone and better understand the technology.
  • Nicole Choma from Breckenridge, Summit High School, developed a partnership between her own rugby team and a local after school program designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating behaviors in children. Older students taught a rugby lesson at elementary schools around Summit County.
  • Kayleigh Cornellfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, started the Colorado Book Bank and collected more than 1,300 new and gently used books for students in a summer lunch program.
  • Aubree Crockett from Colorado Springs, Vanguard High School, wanted to create understanding and acceptance between people around the world while inspiring people to create positive change on their own. She did this through distributing electronic kits, which included a digital camera and instructions for how people could share their daily life, to people all over the world. Fifty-two participants and 25+ partner organizations have all received a copy of the book and more stories are being collected and added to the project.
  • Peyton Dailey from Centennial, Grandview High School, created a coalition between Spanish Honor Society students at her school and the Independent Learning Communities program, to provide ILC students the opportunity to learn and practice Spanish in a one-on-one setting.
  • Victoria Delatefrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, created a four-week self-defense course to give her fellow students the knowledge and skills to protect themselves from sexual assault.
  • Emma Deutschfrom Denver, Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning, improved the cat rooms at the Denver Animal Shelter. By creating a more welcoming and colorful space, she encouraged more people to adopt cats.
  • Kamaryn Evansfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, worked to raise awareness for victims of domestic violence and for the Crisis Center, which works to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and prevention.
  • Inspired by her own love of music and struggles with mental health, Madeline Farr from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, worked to install a piece of outdoor musical equipment called a “metallophone” on the playground of a low-resource elementary school. She also provided the school with lesson plans for how to use the instrument and educated her community about the importance of alternate recess activities for anxious young people.
  • Brenna Giblin of Westminster, Jefferson County Open School, worked to increase awareness for Turner Syndrome and help girls who are diagnosed with it. TS is a chromosomal disorder that affects 25-50 out of every 100,000 live baby girl births. Brenna created a video of girls with TS sharing their stories, experiences, and advice for others.
  • Rose Goodmanfrom Boulder, Boulder High School, created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees.
  • Elizabeth Hoelscherfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage survivors of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls.
  • Ashlin Hultfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, created a series of materials for middle-school girls to encourage healthy body image and increase self-esteem.
  • Zoi Johnsfrom Golden, Lakewood High School, coordinated the installation of three 10,000-liter water filtration tanks in a school in rural Uganda and educated students in Uganda and in Colorado about the importance of clean water.
  • Emma Kerr from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, built a bookshelf and reading center at a local elementary school. With the help of administrators and teachers, she also started a fun and competitive read-a-thon program in which more than 300 students participated.
  • Emelie Knitz from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon Campus High School, created a cookbook for FoCo Café in Fort Collins to educate people about what community cafés are, how they help the public, and where people can find other community cafés.
  • Makayla Kocherfrom Monument, Colorado Springs Christian School, created an art program for nursing home residents.
  • Kayleigh Limbachfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, wrote a guidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academic future.
  • Ty’esha Lockyer from Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Christian School, worked to encourage more people to volunteer for Special Olympics. She created a brochure and posters that went to more than 100 volunteer and civic organizations across the county.
  • Justine Monsell from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, partnered with American Legion Post 82 and the Elizabeth Cemetery to provide emblem markers and flags for the more than 150 veterans who are laid to rest in the cemetery.
  • Alexis Montaguefrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, hosted a panel discussion so girls could learn more about career opportunities in STEM.
  • Riley Morgenthaler from Morrison, Conifer High School, created Creativity Tool Tubs to help close the gap that students living in low-resource areas face when participating in the STEM-based activity, Destination Imagination.
  • Sarah Nessfrom Centennial, Eaglecrest High School, hosted nearly two dozen after-school art therapy sessions to help kids at her school relieve and manage stress.
  • Gwyneth Ormesfrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, organized a series of after-school workshops to teach elementary school girls Processing (a basic programming language), along with the foundational concepts of computer science.
  • Emma Parkhurstfrom Centennial, Littleton High School, revitalized The Lions Cupboard, a local clothing closet, to make the space more accessible for families in need.
  • Jaden Scott from Fort Collins, Fort Collins High School, partnered with BASE Camp, an after school enrichment program, to offer dance classes as an extracurricular activity. Throughout her project, she taught more than 230 children dance at elementary schools throughout the Fort Collins area.
  • Abagail Sickingerfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to help high school students get a job. Topics included: resume writing, what to wear, conducting yourself during an interview, and how to answer interview questions.
  • Katrina Stroudfrom Boulder, Niwot High School, created an activity booklet for The Butterfly Pavilion to teach children about Monarch butterflies and bumble bees.
  • Grayson Thomasfrom Lyons, Lyons High School, designed a mural of diverse and significant members of the STEM community for Lyons Middle/Senior High School.
  • Lillian Tobias from Breckenridge, Summit High School, partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and traveled to Haiti to set up an entrepreneurship program at St. Paul’s school in the rural coastal town of Petit Trou de Nippes.
  • Marieke van Ervenfrom Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.
  • Melissa Wilsonfrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, developed several materials to educate people who can hear about how to interact with those who are deaf.
  • Inspired by her mother’s battle with cancer, Susan Wilsonfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, created a media center for cancer patients undergoing treatment at Parker Adventist Hospital.
  • Mihaela Zaharescu from Broomfield, Prospect Ridge Academy, worked with her school’s National Honor Society chapter to create dental care packets for children in need. She also organized a drive to collect toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, and mouthwash to go into the packets.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Volunteer Appreciation Month: A tree for every volunteer

Girl Scouts prepares girls for a lifetime of leadership. You – our amazing volunteers – play a big part in their success.

Our appreciation gift to volunteers this year is to have thousands of trees planted in areas around the state of Colorado that have been devastated by wildfires and floods. We made a donation to the Restoring Colorado’s Forests Fund, through the Colorado State Forest Service, to purchase a tree in honor of each of our volunteers.

Your time, energy, and dedication to making Girl Scouts a great experience for girls has a lasting and positive impact. In recognition of all the amazing things that you do, we chose the gift of trees that will also have a lasting and positive impact by helping to restore forested areas in our beautiful state.

Thank you for being a Girl Scout volunteer!

Stephanie A. Foote, President and CEO

Girl Scouts of Colorado

Thank You Letter to Girl Scouts of CO From Mike Lester

 

40 Colorado Girl Scouts earn Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts

This spring 40 Colorado Girl Scouts will receive the Gold Award, the highest achievement in Girl Scouts. These young women are challenged to change the world – or at least their corner of it. Gold Award Girl Scouts are making the world a better place. They’ve completed a large-scale project that solves a community problem not only in the short-term but for years into the future. By doing so, they’ve gained extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

This year’s Colorado Gold Award projects benefited communities around the world. Topics varied from creating a cookbook and raising awareness for community cafés nationwide to educating elementary school students about the declining bee population to helping Haitian children learn valuable business skills. Lillian Tobias from Breckenridge traveled to Haiti to set up an entrepreneurship program at St. Paul’s school in the rural coastal town of Petit Trou de Nippes. Emelie Knitz from Colorado Springs created a cookbook for FoCo Café in Fort Collins to educate people about what community cafés are and how they help the public. Rose Goodman from Boulder created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees. Marieke van Erven from Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the local elections department into high school government classes.

The following Colorado Girl Scouts are among the 40 statewide who will receive the prestigious Gold Award for the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards year:

  • Losing a close family friend to testicular cancer inspired Geneva Ascher from Breckenridge, Summit High School, to teach young people how to properly perform self breast and testicular exams. The lesson plans she created and delivered to her classmates will continue to be used by her school.
  • Meg Bleylefrom Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, worked to increase the bee population by teaching children about how people need and depend on bees.
  • Beth Bolonfrom Longmont hosted a workshop for sixth through ninth grade girls to help them improve their communication skills and bolster their confidence when interacting with others.
  • Cheyanne Bridgesfrom Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with the Pikes Peak Humane Society to support their animal medical fund by providing a sustainable source of donations from her school.
  • Tara Butlerfrom Denver, Overland High School, created a course and curriculum specifically for senior citizens to educate them on how to use their smartphone and better understand the technology.
  • Nicole Choma from Breckenridge, Summit High School, developed a partnership between her own rugby team and a local after school program designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating behaviors in children. Older students taught a rugby lesson at elementary schools around Summit County.
  • Kayleigh Cornellfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, started the Colorado Book Bank and collected more than 1,300 new and gently used books for students in a summer lunch program.
  • Aubree Crockett from Colorado Springs, Vanguard High School, wanted to create understanding and acceptance between people around the world while inspiring people to create positive change on their own. She did this through distributing electronic kits, which included a digital camera and instructions for how people could share their daily life, to people all over the world. Fifty-two participants and 25+ partner organizations have all received a copy of the book and more stories are being collected and added to the project.
  • Peyton Dailey from Centennial, Grandview High School, created a coalition between Spanish Honor Society students at her school and the Independent Learning Communities program, to provide ILC students the opportunity to learn and practice Spanish in a one-on-one setting.
  • Victoria Delatefrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, created a four-week self-defense course to give her fellow students the knowledge and skills to protect themselves from sexual assault.
  • Emma Deutschfrom Denver, Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning, improved the cat rooms at the Denver Animal Shelter. By creating a more welcoming and colorful space, she encouraged more people to adopt cats.
  • Kamaryn Evansfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, worked to raise awareness for victims of domestic violence and for the Crisis Center, which works to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and prevention.
  • Inspired by her own love of music and struggles with mental health, Madeline Farr from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, worked to install a piece of outdoor musical equipment called a “metallophone” on the playground of a low-resource elementary school. She also provided the school with lesson plans for how to use the instrument and educated her community about the importance of alternate recess activities for anxious young people.
  • Brenna Giblin of Westminster, Jefferson County Open School, worked to increase awareness for Turner Syndrome and help girls who are diagnosed with it. TS is a chromosomal disorder that affects 25-50 out of every 100,000 live baby girl births. Brenna created a video of girls with TS sharing their stories, experiences, and advice for others.
  • Rose Goodmanfrom Boulder, Boulder High School, created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees.
  • Elizabeth Hoelscherfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage survivors of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls.
  • Ashlin Hultfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, created a series of materials for middle-school girls to encourage healthy body image and increase self-esteem.
  • Zoi Johnsfrom Golden, Lakewood High School, coordinated the installation of three 10,000-liter water filtration tanks in a school in rural Uganda and educated students in Uganda and in Colorado about the importance of clean water.
  • Emma Kerr from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, built a bookshelf and reading center at a local elementary school. With the help of administrators and teachers, she also started a fun and competitive read-a-thon program in which more than 300 students participated.
  • Emelie Knitz from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon Campus High School, created a cookbook for FoCo Café in Fort Collins to educate people about what community cafés are, how they help the public, and where people can find other community cafés.
  • Makayla Kocherfrom Monument, Colorado Springs Christian School, created an art program for nursing home residents.
  • Kayleigh Limbachfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, wrote a guidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academic future.
  • Ty’esha Lockyer from Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Christian School, worked to encourage more people to volunteer for Special Olympics. She created a brochure and posters that went to more than 100 volunteer and civic organizations across the county.
  • Justine Monsell from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, partnered with American Legion Post 82 and the Elizabeth Cemetery to provide emblem markers and flags for the more than 150 veterans who are laid to rest in the cemetery.
  • Alexis Montaguefrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, hosted a panel discussion so girls could learn more about career opportunities in STEM.
  • Riley Morgenthaler from Morrison, Conifer High School, created Creativity Tool Tubs to help close the gap that students living in low-resource areas face when participating in the STEM-based activity, Destination Imagination.
  • Sarah Nessfrom Centennial, Eaglecrest High School, hosted nearly two dozen after-school art therapy sessions to help kids at her school relieve and manage stress.
  • Gwyneth Ormesfrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, organized a series of after-school workshops to teach elementary school girls Processing (a basic programming language), along with the foundational concepts of computer science.
  • Emma Parkhurstfrom Centennial, Littleton High School, revitalized The Lions Cupboard, a local clothing closet, to make the space more accessible for families in need.
  • Jaden Scott from Fort Collins, Fort Collins High School, partnered with BASE Camp, an after school enrichment program, to offer dance classes as an extracurricular activity. Throughout her project, she taught more than 230 children dance at elementary schools throughout the Fort Collins area.
  • Abagail Sickingerfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to help high school students get a job. Topics included: resume writing, what to wear, conducting yourself during an interview, and how to answer interview questions.
  • Katrina Stroudfrom Boulder, Niwot High School, created an activity booklet for The Butterfly Pavilion to teach children about Monarch butterflies and bumble bees.
  • Grayson Thomasfrom Lyons, Lyons High School, designed a mural of diverse and significant members of the STEM community for Lyons Middle/Senior High School.
  • Lillian Tobias from Breckenridge, Summit High School, partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and traveled to Haiti to set up an entrepreneurship program at St. Paul’s school in the rural coastal town of Petit Trou de Nippes.
  • Marieke van Ervenfrom Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.
  • Melissa Wilsonfrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, developed several materials to educate people who can hear about how to interact with those who are deaf.
  • Inspired by her mother’s battle with cancer, Susan Wilsonfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, created a media center for cancer patients undergoing treatment at Parker Adventist Hospital.
  • Mihaela Zaharescu from Broomfield, Prospect Ridge Academy, worked with her school’s National Honor Society chapter to create dental care packets for children in need. She also organized a drive to collect toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, and mouthwash to go into the packets.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, president and chief executive officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership are making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado will honor these Gold Award Girl Scouts as well as recipients of Girl Scouts’ other two Highest Awards, the Silver (the Highest Award a Girl Scout Cadette can earn) and Bronze (the Highest Award a Girl Scout Junior can earn), at upcoming ceremonies around the state. These events include:

  • April 20 at 6 p.m. at Center for American Values, 101 S. Main St. #100, Pueblo
  • April 22 at 2 p.m. Embassy Suites by Hilton, 4705 Clydesdale Pkwy, Loveland
  • April 29 at 2 p.m. at the Denver Marriott Tech Center, 4900 S. Syracuse St., Denver
  • May 4 at 6 p.m. at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion 1661 Mesa Ave., Colorado Springs
  • May 6 at 2 p.m. Colorado Mesa University, 1100 North Ave., Grand Junction
  • May 11 at 6 p.m. at Silverthorne Pavilion, 400 Blue River Pkwy, Silverthorne

You can learn more about these extraordinary young women and their projects on the Girl Scouts of Colorado blog. You have permission to use the photos and biographies of any of the girls listed above in print or online publications. If you would like to interview any of these Girl Scouts about their project and the impact it had, please contact AnneMarie Harper, Girl Scouts of Colorado public relations director.