Category Archives: Alumnae News

Girl Scout alums Katie Couric, Queen Latifah, Melinda Gates, Dolores Huerta, Karlie Kloss, and others remind the world that Girl Scouts grows female leaders who drive powerful change

From Girl Scouts of the USA

Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) released a new national PSA, “Lifetime of Leadership,” heralding the organization’s legacy of fostering female change-makers and preparing girls for a lifetime of leadership, success, and adventure. Featuring notable Girl Scout alums in fields such as technology, politics, media, and sports, the PSA showcases the positive change these powerful female leaders have created through activism, speaking up, breaking glass ceilings, and more—and illustrates the importance of Girl Scouts in providing girls with the leadership experiences they need to make their voices heard and effect change.

From philanthropist Melinda Gates and athlete Venus Williams, to supermodel and entrepreneur Karlie Kloss, Girl Scout alums highlighted in the PSA have inspired people worldwide. Narrated by Queen Latifah, the PSA also features Dolores Huerta, Barbara Walters, Katie Couric, Senator Tammy Duckworth, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Ellen Kuras, Dr. N. Jan Davis, Tyra Banks, Sheryl Crow, Céline Dion, Dakota Fanning, Susan Wojcicki, Senator Susan Collins, and Cassandra Levesque, a 19-year-old Girl Scout alum who worked to ban child marriage in New Hampshire.

“Lifetime of Leadership” brings to life what recent studies have shown: Girl Scouts have better life outcomes than their non–Girl Scout peers. They are more confident, seek challenges to a greater degree, are more active decision-makers, and are more proficient problem-solvers in their communities. The PSA also shows how civic engagement is a core part of the Girl Scout DNA—which is why it premiered today at G.I.R.L. Agenda 2018: Leading Change Through Civic Action. This unique event, which took place in Philadelphia, featured a keynote address from educator and former second lady of the United States Dr. Jill Biden, and a panel moderated by writer, professor, and television host Dr. Melissa Harris-Perry. Thousands of girls and those who care about them joined in-person and virtually for a conversation about preparing girls to lead positive change. The PSA brought to life what a Girl Scout’s leadership journey can look like as she grows into a woman, and it inspired all in attendance to take the lead and take action in support of causes they care about.

“We are proud to premiere our powerful new PSA and showcase the impactful change that Girl Scout alums have created to make the world a better place,” said Sylvia Acevedo, GSUSA CEO. “We know that leadership and meaningful civic action start at a young age—at home, at school, and in local communities. This PSA is a rallying cry for more girls to realize their leadership potential with Girl Scouts. The world is counting on them, and we hope our more than 50 million alums will be inspired to reconnect with us and share their leadership journey with the next generation of girls who will lead our country into the future.”

“I have no doubt that the girls of today will become the leaders and change-makers of tomorrow. Supporting them, empowering them and ensuring they have the opportunities they deserve is good for all of us,” said Dr. Jill Biden. “My Girl Scout experience taught me confidence, perseverance, and gave me skills that inspired me to pursue public service and helped me become a better leader. Girl Scouts is the preeminent organization that gives girls the place and the opportunity to develop their powerful voices.”

The new Girl Scout PSA was created and written by Girl Scout alum, Rachel Howald, founder and CCO, Invisible Man.

To watch the PSA and for more information about Girl Scouts, visit www.girlscouts.org/leadership. To join or volunteer, visit www.girlscouts.org/join.

About the G.I.R.L. Agenda Powered by Girl Scouts

A nonpartisan initiative to inspire, prepare, and mobilize girls and those who care about them to lead positive change through civic action, the G.I.R.L. Agenda makes expert-curated civic engagement resources, derived from Girl Scouts of the USA’s programming, accessible to all girls, as well as adults. The free tools give hundreds of thousands of girls and adults tangible ways to take civic action on topics of their choosing. To advance the G.I.R.L. Agenda and for tips on leading positive change through civic action, visit www.girlagenda.org.

 

Girl Scouts announces 2018 Denver Metro Women of Distinction: 10 Extraordinary women honored

This year’s honorees were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Tasha Jones, Woman of Distinction ‘15, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. They are shining examples of corporate, civic and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow. The Women of Distinction program brings together a group of women dedicated to raising support for Girl Scout leadership programs.

  • Janine Davidson, President, Metropolitan State University of Denver
  • Ruth Fountain Eide, Community Leader
  • Therese Ellery, Senior Program Officer, Aging Program, Rose Community Foundation
  • Gretchen Hammer, Medicaid Director, Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing
  • Peggy E. Jennings, CPA, Partner, Eide Bailly LLP
  • Lisa Zúñiga Ramirez, Principal, Senior Portfolio Manager, Segall Bryant & Hamill
  • Meshach Rhoades, Partner, Armstrong Teasdale LLP
  • Terri Richardson, MD, Kaiser Permanente Colorado
  • Tinesha Ross, Government and Commercial Programs, Manager, System Safety & Quality, United Launch Alliance
  • Becky Takeda-Tinker, Ph.D., President & CEO of Colorado State University-Global Campus; and CEO of Beyond Campus Innovations, Inc. an entity of the CSU System Foundation

Girl Scouts of Colorado will welcome the Class of 2018 honorees with a private reception on June 21, 2018 at the Colorado Auto Dealers Association from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The celebration concludes with the Thin Mint Dinner on October 2, 2018 at Denver Marriott Tech Center from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. The event includes Thin Mint Cocktails and dessert made with Thin Mints, three-course meal, and event program. Event co-chairs are Brook Kramer, Senior VP, Senior Regional Fiduciary Manager, Philanthropic Services, Wells Fargo Private Bank, Woman of Distinction ‘16 and Pat Cortez, Senior VP, Community Affairs Manager, Community Relations and CRA Risk Management Department, Wells Fargo Government and Community Relations Group, Woman of Distinction ’04.

For information regarding tickets and sponsorships, visit girlscoutsofcolorado.org/woddenver or contact Heidi Books at 303-607-4833 or at heidi.books@gscolorado.org.

 

Women of Distinction Corporate Champion Award: Nominations now being accepted

Do you know of a Denver business or corporate team who is dedicated to helping women and girls succeed through their volunteerism, mentorship, and philanthropic efforts? Nominate now for the Women of Distinction Corporate Champion Award. Honorees will be announced in May 2018.

The 2018 Corporate Champion will be recognized at the 2018 Women of Distinction Thin Mint Dinner on October 2, 2018 in Denver. The annual Thin Mint Dinner recognizes Women of Distinction and Corporate Champions who serve as models of inspiration to Girl Scouts.

A nominated business should:

• demonstrate dedication to advancing women in their industry
• provide support and encouragement to women and girls in their industry, including a dynamic and inclusive working environment
• have a proven track record of community service/volunteerism to support girls’ and women’s issues
• raise awareness about the remarkable work of talented women in our community

Nominations open through March 23, 2018 at https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/untitled_form_64. (to nominate a business, select Denver, and Woman of Distinction Corporate Champion)

Questions? Contact Heidi.Books@gscolorado.org or 303-607-4833.

Pikes Peak Region to host open house

The Pikes Peak Region of Girl Scouts of Colorado will host an open house at its office on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. The office is located at 5353 N. Union Blvd., Suite 101 in Colorado Springs. Anyone is welcome to attend, and while an RSVP is not required, it is appreciated. Please call Debbie Swanson at 719-304-8322, or contact her at debbie.swanson@gscolorado.org, to give her your reservation.

The invitation to attend has been sent to community and business leaders in the area, along with donors, alumnae, and volunteers. Guests will sample Girl Scout Cookies and learn how to find cookie booths in their area, so they can purchase cookies. They will also see a demonstration of the online cookie ordering process for those guests who are acquainted with a Girl Scout with whom an order can be placed. Other snacks and beverages will be provided.

Guests will also hear about what the Girl Scouts will be doing in the Pikes Peak Region for 2018. This will include an Outreach Program to enroll girls who come from low-resource areas, the Gold Award, and some potential fundraisers. All are invited to come and learn more about the Girl Scouts of Colorado!

Girl Scout Cookie Program 2018 Display at Loveland Public Library

Submitted by Linda Robinson

Northern & Northeastern CO

Loveland

The GSCO History Committee has set up a display at the Loveland Public Library (300 N. Adams Ave, Loveland, CO 80537) featuring the 2018 cookie program. The display will be up for the entire month of January.

It is a colorful display of cookie packages, prizes, and information on the program. The committee highlighted this year’s program and The 5 Skills to help educate the public about all that goes into the Girl Scout Cookie Program. It is so much more than girls selling cookies and getting prizes. It is about girls learning goal setting, money management, people skills, decision making, and business ethics. Be sure to check out the bottom shelf for some history of the Girl Scout Cookie Program and see some vintage cookie cases.

If you’d like more information on the history of the cookie program or would like to see some of past year’s prizes and themes, please contact the GSCO History Committee at gscohistory@gmail.com.
Since this display will only be up during the month of January, it will be available for use in another community during the cookie program. Let the History Committee know if you have a place in your area for this display.

We have several programs available for troops to do while visiting the GSCO History Center in Loveland and several take out programs. The History Committee works on Tuesdays and is open by appointment on the 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too

G.I.R.L. 2017: My story

Submitted by Caroline Cornell

Metro Denver

Aurora

Girl Scouts of the USA held it’s 54th Girl Scout National Council Session and Convention in Columbus, Ohio in October. The National Council is made up of delegates from councils across the United States, Girl Scouts Overseas, and National Board members.  It convenes every three years to vote on the business of Girl Scouts including matters like membership dues, electing the National Board of Directors. The National Council Session also includes a discussion about topics that are of interest to The Movement such as how do we better serve all girls? Best of all, we celebrate the Girl Scout Movement and have a great time! No time to sleep – there’s so much to do!

Colorado sent 13 delegates, including two girl delegates and several staff members.  Our delegation was led by GSCO Board Chair Rae Ann Dougherty and President and CEO Stephanie Foote. The delegation was also joined by members of GSCO’s History and Global Girl Scouts Committees as well as Gracie from Boulder who was in the Girls Got Talent Show and Cassidy Christian, a roving reporter from Highlands Ranch who covered the G.I.R.L. Convention. Together, we explored many way girls can be G.I.R.Ls (go-getters, innovators, risk-takers, and leaders).

To prepare for the National Council Session, throughout the fall the Membership Connection Committee (MCC) surveyed membership across Colorado to obtain feedback about how Girl Scouts can better serve girls. I am pleased to report Colorado’s opinions echoed the opinions shared from across the country at Convention such as establishing uniform training and Highest Awards standards, building partnerships to provide new opportunities for older girls (i.e. Outdoor Adventure Club), and supporting our growing outreach program.

In addition to the discussion questions asked at the National Council Session, there were also three proposals relating to the governance of Girl Scouts of the USA. The first proposal was a request from the National Board to reduce the number of Board members from 25 to 15 to bring it in line with best practices. After much debate, this proposal failed to pass. The second proposal was a bit more complicated and also did not pass. It involved the National Board Delegate Committee that chooses the next slate of National Board Members.  As part of their role, members participate in National Board meetings so they can find the best available candidates to be on the National Board during the next triennium. At present three of the seven members are non-voting National Board members. The National Board felt it was important that these three members be considered full Board Members; however, they failed to make the case and the motion was defeated through debate. The third proposal contained three parts and designed to separate the lifetime dues rate from the previous 25 times the annual membership rate and extend the discounted rate to alumni between 18 and 30 years old.  While there was debate around some finer points, this proposal eventually passed with enthusiasm. What this now means is that the lifetime membership dues are set at $400 and that young women age 18 to 30 can now receive a discounted rate of $200 if they are Girl Scouts alumnae rather than just in the year they graduate from high school.  (Pssst – if you’re an alumnus and are under 30, now’s your chance to become a lifetime member!)

If you’re into political science like I am, this day at the National Council session presented an incredible opportunity to see democracy in action and served as an excellent example of how governance should work in an organization such as Girl Scouts. To put it broader terms, this is how a government functions when it’s at its best.

After a day full of Robert’s Rule of Order, it was time for some fun! Over the next few days, the G.I.R.L. team, known as the G-Team made up of 30 girls from across the country hosted a ton of activities for the nearly 10,000 girls in attendance. We had a huge Colorado group who listened to Chelsea Clinton, Barbara Pierce Bush (you know, Jenna’s twin), and many more speakers designed to inspire us about becoming a G.I.R.L. with breakout sessions in each area.

At the opening session to the National Council Session, we were treated to a presentation from JoAnn Deak about building stronger girls by exercising our elastic brains. How do you top that? Have astronaut and Peace Corps physician Mae Jamison opened the G.I.R.L. Convention telling us about how she took risks to reach for the stars. The finale was featured Olympians Gabby Douglas and Sasha Cohen. Such an amazing week!

If you’re interested in learning more and having an opportunity to serve as a delegate to the 2020 convention in Orlando, Florida, the MCC is seeking new members, particularly from metro Denver, northeastern Colorado, and Colorado Springs.  Learn more about the MCC on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

G.I.R.L. 2017: My experience

Submitted by Nicole Fry

Northern & Northeastern CO

Severance

Having been a Girl Scout for several years and going on several solo trips I have been able to experience and learn so much. Since becoming an adult member, these trips have become slightly simpler with my troop of mixed girls up until recently when I had the opportunity to attend the Girl Scout National Convention in Columbus, Ohio this past October. This was an opportunity that I was so grateful for and learned so much along with making so many new Girl Scout memories. My favorite place to be at convention, besides the business sessions, was the Hall of Experiences.

The Hall of Experiences is exactly what it sounds like, a large hall with a wide variety of experiences for girls and adult members. This is a place where Girl Scouts are exposed to other vendors that support Girl Scouts and a chance to meet the other product vendors as well. Some of the vendors in the hall were Paypal, Disney on Broadway, and Universal Studios just to name a few. Along with our product program vendors, M2 Media and Little Brownie Bakers, there was also Ashdon Farms and ABC Bakers. All of the product program vendors had samples of their products, so it gave you a chance to taste the other items and have an idea of what our customers refer to during the cookie program.

The most popular spot in the hall was the NASA space spot. This is because girls were able to have lots of hands-on experiences while the adults were able to gain more information about the programs that they offer to Girl Scouts. Along with all the opportunities they offered to Girl Scouts, they had a poster that girls were able to take home which showed the various women astronauts and when they were Girl Scouts. Girls were really able to be themselves in the hall because all vendors were centered on them and how it can help them as a Girl Scout.

Being a first time delegate and convention member, I was definitely open-minded to all that I was about to experience. While in the Hall of Experiences, it’s all about gathering all the information and bringing it back to share with everyone else who was unable to attend. Simply because your troop may not be interested in space camp, but another troop in your area may be.

I highly recommend if anyone has the chance to attend a future convention to not pass up the opportunity. You will come back feeling like a brand new leader with lots of knowledge and insight to share with everyone.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Gold Award Girl Scout delivers featured speech at Women of Distinction Breakfast

Gold Award Girl Scout Kathleen Otto of Fort Collins was a featured speaker at Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Women of Distinction Breakfast in Grand Junction.  She told the audience of Girl Scouts and supporters about her journey through Girl Scouts.

My last 12 years as a Girl Scout has given me so many opportunities to learn and grow, making me the person I am today. This morning, I’m thrilled to share my amazing experience in Girl Scouting with you.

I remember the first Girl Scout meeting I attended. I was in first grade and a new Brownie. My troop would meet in the library of my elementary school and I remember we would have tables lined up in a big “U” shape so we could all see one another. We spent time learning the Girl Scout Promise and Law—and at every troop meeting we would stand to say the Pledge of Allegiance and then the Promise and Law to remind ourselves of how to behave toward one another and our community every day. Of course, being 6-years-old, I did not yet realize what a remarkable family and community I had joined.

Being a Girl Scout helped me learn important business and people skills and one of the most well know skill building opportunities is, as you all probably know, selling cookies. The first thing I learned about selling cookies was to be charming! This tip works well when you are still a Brownie, but as you become older, it gets a little trickier. Once I reached middle and high school, selling cookies door-to-door required connections and loyal customers that had known me since I was a little Brownie. But, the best way to earn and sell cookies was always at a booth. I remember I was in 4th or 5th grade, it was January, and snowing. My friend and I stood at a cookie booth outside of Safeway for 30 minutes, which seemed like forever at that age.  Over 45 minutes passed and we thought to ourselves, “Why did we sign up for a two-hour booth?!” My friend and I were shivering in our boots and snow pants, we were so bored, and no one was coming to buy cookies. Eventually, I was so cold and tired that I decides to let out my pent-up energy, by singing and dancing.

My journey through Girl Scouts did not stop at cookie booths. During my Junior and Senior year of high school, I had the opportunity to earn the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouting.

The Gold Award gave me the opportunity to teach people about a topic that is very important to me – dyslexia. I wanted to educate both parents and teachers about dyslexia and how it impacts children in school settings. This is an important topic for me because I am dyslexic and without the teachers I had, who knew about dyslexia, my school experience would have been so much harder. Without the support system I had growing up, and the teachers I had I don’t think I would have graduated high school with a 4.0 GPA or would have been as prepared as I feel for college.  My Gold Award was a two-step process. First, I organized a viewing of the documentary “The Big Picture – Rethinking Dyslexia”, a story about of people who struggle with dyslexia, and their stories of how they overcame their disability. After the movie, I held a panel discussion with dyslexia experts, who included: a doctor, who specializes in diagnosing dyslexia; teacher, who works specifically with children with learning disabilities;  student and lifelong friend, who suffers from dyslexia; and representative from the Rocky Mountain branch of the International Dyslexia Association. The panel discussion was eye opening for everyone who attended and gave people the chance to connect with others in the community, whom they might have never met without my project. Many parents with children who have dyslexia were able to come together and find understanding with each other and help each other find support for their children.

Step two of my project was to create a Little Free Library in my neighborhood to promote literacy among both adults and children. In all the books that are in the library, I put informational bookmarks provided by the Rocky Mountain branch of the International Dyslexia Association in the hope that I could not only encourage people to read, more but also to continue educating people about dyslexia.

Through earning my Gold Award, I learned many skills required of a successful leader. I learned how to best communicate with my peers and adults, along with programing, public speaking, and marketing skills. I had tapped into each of these skills throughout my years as a Girl Scout and perfected them through earning my Gold Award.

These are the concrete skills that Girl Scouts has taught me, but it also opened doors to see the world. Last summer, I had the chance to go on one last trip with my Girl Scout troop and we decided to go to Europe. With the funds, we earned from the Girl Scout Cookie Program, along with our own money, we went on a 15-day trip across Europe. We went to amazing places and saw wonderful things. My favorite part of our trip was going to Adelboden, Switzerland, and visiting Our Chalet – one of five World Centers of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. The beauty of Our Chalet and the town of Adelboden was incredibly stunning and peaceful. learning the history of how Our Chalet was founded was truly a learning experience and showed me that Girl Scouting really is an international sisterhood.

In addition to traveling around Europe, I had the opportunity to be a camp counselor at Tomahawk Ranch, one of the Girl Scouts of Colorado’s summer camps. After being a camper almost every summer and then a counselor in training, becoming an official counselor at 18 just seemed like the natural next step in my relationship with Girl Scout Camp. Becoming a counselor, I could, make sure that younger girls had the best summer possible. I remember the Director of Tomahawk, Monica Gray, aka Obi Joe, told us during our training – “Camp is a safe place for girls to come and be themselves.” That is what camp was like for me as a child and that is what I wanted camp to be for girls today. Working at Tomahawk is like being in a totally different world. The Director Team at Tomahawk does such an amazing job at making camp a wonderful and amazing experience for every girl. 

One day, half-way into a two-week session, all of the counselors are living off of coffee at this point I thought to myself at lunch, “I knew someone would do it! I knew someone would dip the lettuce in the chocolate!” This might seem completely odd statement, so let me explain. 

For lunch, we were having fondue and there was a chocolate fountain for dessert, our chef spoiled us, with all the fixings you would expect – strawberries, pound cake, bananas, and more. But, these desserts were set on a bed of lettuce, and I thought to myself watch one of these girls dip the lettuce into the chocolate and eat it up. Sure enough, one of my girls came back to the table with chocolate covered lettuce, and everyone started laughing as she began to eat it! I can tell you now that chocolate and lettuce is not a good combo, but everyone laughed, smiled, and tried something new and surprising.

This is the point of Girl Scout Camp – it is random and funny and sometimes completely unexpected. But, no matter how unexpected things are, you’ll always be met with a welcoming smile. Camp is one of the safest places for girls to go where they can be themselves without being branded weird or different. Girl Scout Camp is a safe place for girls to grow and find out who they would like to be and all the amazing things that they are capable of.

Each of these stories describe what Girl Scouts has done for me. Girl Scouts has been the place for me where I can be myself and grow into a person that I didn’t know I could be. Girl Scouts is the reason I can stand before you and speak clearly and with confidence. Girl Scouts is the reason I know I will always have a home and a family no matter where I am. The skills that Girl Scouts has taught me, has given me the self-confidence to live on my own, to start my freshman year of college with only a little trepidation.

This year, I am a freshman at Colorado Mesa University. As of right now I am just starting my core education classes, but my plans are to go into the medical field as a nurse. Girl Scouts has shown me that I love people and enjoy helping my community. Girl Scouts has help teach me that I can achieve whatever I set my mind to.

I want to remind you all the mission of Girl Scouts, “Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.” I stand before you this morning, a Girl Scout for over a decade and a woman with the courage, confidence, and character to continue becoming the best person I can be and make the world a little better every day.

Thank you all so much.

 

 

Girl Scouts honors 2017 Western Slope Women of Distinction

Thursday, November 2, 2017, Girl Scouts of Colorado honored the 2017 inductees into the esteemed Women of Distinction program on the Western Slope during a breakfast at Two Rivers Convention Center in Grand Junction. A group of nearly 275 gathered at the event, which raised more than $20,000 for local Girl Scout programs.

This year’s honorees were:

  • Carma Brown, Personal Lines Manager, Home Loan Insurance
  • Sue Conry, Director, Hilltop Home Care
  • Stacey Mascarenas, Community Development Director, Family Health West

These extraordinary women were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Susan Alvillar, Woman of Distinction 2015, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. They are shining examples of corporate, civic and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow.

The morning’s featured speakers included Gold Award Girl Scout Katie Otto and Silver Award Girl Scout Anela Cronk, who shared their stories of growth and leadership through Girl Scouting. Paula Reece, Woman of Distinction 2016, was this year’s event chair and Betsy Bair, Woman of Distinction 2014, was the event emcee.

The Women of Distinction program began on the Western Slope in 2013. Including this year’s honorees, Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 12 other women on the Western Slope with this honor.

Thank you to our Gold Presenting Sponsor: USBank and Silver Presenting Sponsor: Chevron and FCI Constructors, Inc, and to our Media Sponsor: Townsquare Media.

For further information, contact Cindi Graves at cindi.graves@gscolorado.org or (970) 628-8003.

View the event on Flickr.

Experience the GSCO History Center

Submitted by Linda Robinson

Northern & Northeastern CO

Loveland

The GSCO History Center is located in Loveland. We have a dedicated group of volunteers who meet every Tuesday and give tours by appointment. Due to the popularity of troop visits, we have decided to dedicate the 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month starting January 13, 2018 for troops to set up appointments for a visit. We are also available by appointment during the week while school is out.

We have several programs for troops, including working on the “Playing the Past” badge, “Girl Scout Way” badge, and GSCO Centennial patch. Each program can also include trying on vintage uniforms, as well as a scavenger hunt to find items in the unique areas of the center.

Whichever activity troops choose, please plan on a one and half to two-hour visits. We will be scheduling one visit in the morning and one in the afternoon. Common start times are 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., but we are flexible with start and end times as we understand that some troops travel from around the state.

At the History Center, girls and adults will get to see many different vintage items ranging from uniforms and books to camping equipment, jewelry, and cameras. We have more than 600 uniforms and at least that many books dating back to the early days of Girl Scouting. All the items at the History Center belong to Girl Scouts of Colorado. Many have been donated by individuals around the state over the course of many decades.

Our committee works hard to preserve and protect our Girl Scout history as well as making sure that today’s Girl Scouts have a place to experience what Girl Scouting in the past was all about.
We offer out-based programs and loan uniforms for local parades and events. We only ask that we get pictures of your group in uniform and that they get back to us in a timely manner. Out-based programs include Books in a Bag. These bags are specific to grade level or topic and include vintage books and a program for their use. Contact us for more information.  We also have a vintage fashion show complete with uniforms and a script. Please contact us at gscohistory@gmail.com to set up an appointment or arrange for an out based program or uniforms to be sent to your area.

Don’t have a troop, but would still like to visit? Please send us an email and come join us on a Tuesday work day. There’s always something to do and we can provide on-site training if you’d like to help out for a bit.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.