Category Archives: Alumnae News

Colorado Girl Scouts participate in The Juliette Low Seminar

Girl Scout alums Anna Beucler, Krista Beucler, Kayleigh Cornell, and Caroline Farmar, along with GSCO Board Chair RaeAnn Dougherty participated in The Juliette Low Seminar, the flagship leadership development event for the World Association of Girl Scouts and Girl Guides (WAGGGS). Nearly 1,000 WAGGGS members from 150 countries traveled to 20 different host countries to make new friends, connect with different cultures, and exchange ideas on leadership and gender equality. The seminar took place November 14-20, 2019.

Anna, Krista, Kayleigh, and Caroline were each awarded funds from the RaeAnn & Richard E. Dougherty Look Wider International Travel Fund. Krista’s program was in Thailand, Anna’s in Nigeria, Kayleigh traveled to England, and Caroline to Peru.

Girl Scouts honors 2019 Women of Distinction for the Denver metro-area

Wednesday, October 30, 2019, Girl Scouts of Colorado honored the 2019 Women of Distinction during the Thin Mint Dinner at the Hyatt Regency Denver Tech Center. The 2019 Women of Distinction for the Denver metro-area are:

  • Marti J. Awad, Founding Partner, Cardan Capital Partners
  • The Honorable Dianne L. Briscoe
  • Elycia Cook, President and CEO, FRIENDS FIRST, Inc.
  • Helen Drexler, President and CEO, Delta Dental of Colorado
  • Verónica Figoli, President and CEO, Denver Public Schools Foundation
  • Helen Young Hayes, Founder and CEO, Activate Workforce Solutions
  • Vanecia B. Kerr, Regional Executive Director, College Track Colorado
  • Theresa Szczurek, Chief Information Officer and Executive Director, Colorado Governor’s Office of Information Technology
  • Dr. Sarah Winbourn, Medical Director, Kids First Health Care
  • Robin D. Wittenstein, CEO, Denver Health

A group of nearly 450 gathered at the event, which was chaired by Women of Distinction Tasha Jones ’15 and Michelle Lucero ‘13. The honorees were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Kim Bimestefer ‘15. They are shining examples of corporate, civic, and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow.

New for 2019! Girl Scouts of Colorado recognized the first-ever Corporate Champion – Crocs! This award recognizes hard work in advancing women in their industry, supporting and encouraging women and girls, and working to raise awareness about remarkable women.

The evening’s keynote speaker was Gold Award Girl Scout Emily Kretschmer from Colorado Springs and recipient of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence.

Click here to see pictures from the event! And, be sure to watch Emily’s keynote speech, and listen to the inspiring words from our 2019 Honorees and Corporate Champion, Crocs!

Thank you to all of our generous event sponsors, including Silver Presenting Sponsor, Crocs, and Samoa Sponsors: Arrow, BBVA Compass, Cardan Capital Partners, Delta Dental, Hogan Lovells, and Volunteers of America.

Since 1997 Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 446 Denver-area women with this honor. More than $2 million has been raised by Women of Distinction for Girl Scout programs.

For more information on the Girl Scouts Women of Distinction program, visit girlscoutsofcolorado.org/woddenver or contact heidi.books@gscolorado.org or (303) 607-4833.

 

My visit to the GSCO History Center

Submitted by John Silver, GSCO Guest Blogger

Metro Denver

Denver

Hello Girl Scouts,

Earlier this year, I wrote a blog about my visit to the GSCO History Center in Loveland. There were so many exciting things to talk about that I couldn’t include everything in one post, so I am adding to it today!

The History Center has more than 600 vintage Girl Scout uniforms, sashes, vests, and other accessories.  If a troop is planning to participate in a parade, memorial, or similar event, girls can borrow uniforms and accessories to be worn by the Girl Scouts who will be participating.

Begin the process by giving the center a description and date of the event. The History Center will need to know the number of Girl Scouts who will be participating and their approximate clothing sizes as soon as possible. The volunteers at the center will gather uniforms and accessories matching the occasion. For example, for a Veterans Day parade honoring World War II veterans, uniforms from that era were lent to the troop participating in the parade. The center makes uniforms and accessories available for about 20 events each year, although this number is not an upper limit so check it out.  The lending is done on requests from individual troops.

For other occasions, the volunteers at the center will put together display tables containing Girl Scout artifacts or photos that are “themed” to the occasion.  Examples are Highest Award ceremonies, World Thinking Days, Women of Distinction events, local gatherings, memorials, or anywhere Girl Scout history is of interest.  Display tables can also be prepared for local libraries and for Girl Scout properties around the state.

To learn more or to request uniforms for an event, contact the GSCO History Center at 2004 West 15th Street, Loveland 80538 or email gscohistory@gmail.com.

If your troop plans to participate in a parade, ceremony, or other event, contact the center to see about borrowing uniforms and accessories, or about arranging for a themed display table!

John Silver of Metro Denver is proud to be an adult volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado. As the brother and son of Girl Scouts, John is now an adult seeing Girl Scouts through new eyes. John will be reporting on things he learns– that you might not know either! He will also be researching badge earning and other opportunities for Girl Scouts today.

Daisy’s Circle Supporter Spotlight: Nicole Eubanks

Tell us about your connection to Girl Scouts.

I am a third generation Girl Scout. My grandmother, mom, and I have all participated as Girl Scout volunteers. I have two daughters that are now Girl Scouts and this makes them fourth generation Girl Scouts. I served in various roles in the Girl Scout organization from troop support volunteer, service unit team member, troop leader, and also was on staff at GSCO at one time.

What is the most valuable thing that Girl Scouts gives girls today?

Girl Scouts gives girls the empowerment to build them into strong women as they graduate high school. It offers opportunities for service to others and to improve our communities. The girls receive education in various topics from STEM to the outdoors.

Why did you join Daisy’s Circle?

I believe it is important for all girls to have any opportunity to participate in the Girl Scout program. Girls have an opportunity to participate not only in troop activities, but also in camps and Destination programs. These programs define the women they become. All girls deserve to be courageous and strong!

What is the best thing about monthly giving?

It is easy because you don’t have to remember to write checks.

Is there anything else you would like us to know about you?

Please consider joining Daisy’s Circle. It is easy to set up and then you can make monthly contributions without having to write checks! It provides support to girls in Colorado to have an opportunity to participate in the Girl Scout program. It is an investment in the future of the young women in our state!

Named after Girl Scout founder, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low, Daisy’s Circle is Girl Scouts of Colorado’s monthly giving program. Funds raised through Daisy’s Circle provide financial assistance for girls and volunteers, support Outreach Programs and more.  For more information: https://www.gscodaisyscircle.org/

Four generations of Girl Scouts

Submitted by R. Vicki Scott

Metro Denver

Aurora

My granddaughter’s first Daisy gathering was earlier this month. We are so excited to have four generations of black women in Girl Scouts. We have covered it all:

  • Cookies and area cooking chair (Lola age 83)
  • Volunteer trainer and outdoor skills (Vicki age 59)
  • Marketing staff (Michelle age 35)
  • Our Daisy (Presley age 5)

I just want to shout it from the rooftops – we are all proud and super excited. She will have some of the same experiences we had: camping, horseback riding, ropes courses, team building, making friends – still with my bestie – supporting women’s rights, learning “Leave No Trace,” wider opportunities, parades, day camps, troop meetings, Pax Lodge, Our Cabana, and on and on…

I just wanted to share… Girl Scouts has made a major impression on us all, truly a part of who we have become. Thank you!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout honored as Environmental Educator of the Year

Submitted by Penny Roberts

Northern & Northeastern CO

Estes Park

Gold Award Girl Scout and Lifetime Girl Scout Wendy Roberts, daughter of Jay and Penny Roberts of Estes Park, was recently honored with a prestigious award:  the 2019 Vern A. Fridley Formal Environmental Educator of the Year.  This honor was awarded by the Utah Society for Environmental Education (USEE), and the awards presentation was held on August 9, 2019 at Rowland Hall in Salt Lake City.

Wendy was a teacher in the Estes Park schools for several years in the early 2000s. She began with her student teaching, followed by working as a private tutor and substitute teaching. After she was hired full-time, she taught classes in ESL, Alternative Education, and science to enhance her experience.

She moved from Estes Park to Liberal, Kansas, where she taught eighth grade physical science for two years at the middle school level.  She then moved on to Ogden, Utah, where she now teaches at the DaVinci Academy of Science and the Arts, a public charter school. At DaVinci Academy, she teaches high school Biology, Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination, a college prep program for 7th-12th grades), and also includes electives such as Botany, Zoology, Aquatic Biology, Wildlife Biology and Current Issues in Science in her curriculum.  Previously, she had taught Chemistry and Earth Systems.  This year, she has added to her job description the role of Instructional Specialist for the teachers of 7th-12th grades and professional development training.

Wendy has also worked extensively with the Great Salt Lake Institute at Westminster College; she instructs teachers how to use the Great Salt Lake in their science curriculum and how to take students on field trips there.  She has worked the entire water cycle into field trips by traveling from the top of the watershed to the entire length of the Salt Lake, showing students the magic and wonder of this unique environment.

In addition, she has worked through the Utah State University to acquire Master Naturalist certifications in Mountains and Wetlands.

Alex Porpora, Executive Director for USEE says, “We are so proud to acknowledge this year’s environmental education awardees and their contributions to our community.  These individuals are role models and inspire me to do the work we do at USEE.”  Further she reports, “Our mission is promoting excellence in environmental education by providing support, resources and networking opportunities to Utah’s community of educators.  Our vision is an environmentally literate society committed to a sustainable future.”

One of Wendy’s current environmental science students was also honored at the USEE awards ceremony, as one of Utah’s “5 under 25” for her work with air quality legislation at the city and state levels. Wendy says she was more in awe of her student’s recognition and levels of dedication than her own award. At the awards ceremony, Wendy said, in summary, “My mom was my greatest inspiration.  She made me look at things (in the surrounding environment) and then she told me that I needed to tell everybody else.  Yes, I make my students hug trees and I make my administrators stop buying plastic bottles.”

She attributes her love for the outdoors and education to her years of working with the Girl Scouts, primarily at Meadow Mountain Ranch near Allenspark.  It’s easy to see how that Girl Scout background has translated to the level of “master teacher,” as evident in her success which is now reaching beyond her own school and into the broader Utah community.

Wendy worked as Assistant Camp Director at MMR for three years, where she directed program and trained staff.  In addition, she participated with “The Milkweeds” in the adult trip to Our Cabana in Mexico where the group visited the Monarch butterfly preserve and helped with an International Festival and a community outreach service project.  Several years later, part of that same group of women, including Wendy, returned to Our Cabana this year to take part in Sea Adventure II, where they were awarded an opportunity to help with a project to protect and preserve sea turtles near Acapulco.  For Wendy, almost any outdoor project is a huge attraction, and she will continue to seek out similar adventures inside or outside the Girl Scout organization.

She helps her mom, Penny, with the program and promotion of Women’s Week at Meadow Mountain Ranch every year, returning to her roots to reconnect with that very special wilderness environment.  Adventures are never-ending when she gets a chance to share with friends old and new on her personal “stomping grounds.”

Please join her parents in celebrating Wendy’s outstanding accomplishment. The future will continue to be bright and will reward her over and over as she works to further her personal and professional goals.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

 

 

Gold Award Girl Scout: Three years later

My name is Emily Walker and I am currently a senior completing my final semester at the University of Northern Colorado as an Audiology major. I grew up in the town of Castle Rock, where I was involved in Girl Scouts from elementary school to high school.  

It has been three years since I earned my Girl Scout Gold Award for my project “Community Comfort.” The focus of this project was to bring comfort to individuals and families involved in emergency situations. Teddy bears and blankets were originally provided to the Castle Rock Police and Castle Rock Fire and Rescue departments to be handed out to those in need of their services. Now, these items of comfort are being distributed by the emergency services of Castle Rock, the Help and Hope task force of Douglas and Elbert County, and the Denver Rescue Mission. The students involved in the BIONIC team of Castle Rock Middle School continue to host an annual fundraiser to purchase teddy bears and blanket materials for Community Comfort. 

The Gold Award has continued to impact my life in the past three years. I have been able to apply the life skills I have learned from completing my project to my studies at my university, especially time management, financial management, and public speaking. As I am preparing for graduate school, I know these skills, and many others I have gained through the Gold Award experience, will continue to benefit me in the future. My compassion for helping and serving my community continues to grow and I hope to inspire others to do the same for their own communities. 

Historical Girl Scout Collection

Former Girl Scout troop leader and passionate collector Jacklyn Beard donated her extensive collection of Girl Scout memorabilia to the Grand Junction Leadership Center. The collection includes antique dolls, books, bandanas, pins, towels, and more. Girl Scouts of Colorado is grateful she chose to share these unique finds with us. The bulk of the dolls will be on display in Grand Junction before heading to the Girl Scout History Center in Loveland. Historical donations can be made in your local Girl Scout office or by contacting Heidi Books at heidi.books@gscolorado.org.

Daisy’s Circle Supporter Spotlight: Karrie Adamson

Tell us about your connection to Girl Scouts.

I started as a leader when my oldest was in second grade. I had those girls until they graduated high school. When my girls were in school, I was the service unit manager for five years. I loved what the Girl Scout Cookie Program gave the girls, so I got heavily involved and loved watching the girls achieve goals and gain confidence. In 1994, I got talked into volunteering at day camp and found my place! I worked at Genesee the next year as a counselor and then moved to the urban team as the business manager and then took over as the director where I stayed until the program was eliminated. During the school year, I worked at a few different outreach programs until I found my passion for the Focus on Ability program where I have been for the last 20 years.

What is the most valuable thing that Girl Scouts gives girls today?

The ability to have self confidence! I love that it gives them a place where they can try new things and explore with safe boundaries and amazing mentors, My girls still attribute many of the leadership skills they have and self confidence to Girl Scouts.

Why did you join Daisy’s Circle?

I joined because as a leader and camp director, I saw many girls benefit from scholarships that allowed them the experience when money was not available for them. I would like to help girls have that experience.

What is the best thing about monthly giving?

It produces an ongoing, reliable source of income.

Named after Girl Scout founder, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low, Daisy’s Circle is Girl Scouts of Colorado’s monthly giving program. Funds raised through Daisy’s Circle provide financial assistance for girls and volunteers, support Outreach Programs and more.  For more information: https://www.gscodaisyscircle.org/

Daisy’s Circle Supporter Spotlight: Amy Deschamp

Tell us about your connection to Girl Scouts.

I am a leader in a multi-level troop, mostly working with Daisies. I am a mom of a Girl Scout and a Girl Scout alum.

What is the most valuable thing that Girl Scouts gives girls today?

Experiences in a place where risk-taking and leadership is encouraged and developed with great role models

Why did you join Daisy’s Circle?

Not every girl is as lucky as my daughter or other girls in our troop, all girls should get an opportunity to be a Girl Scout!

What is the best thing about monthly giving?

It is easy because you don’t have to remember to write checks.

Named after Girl Scout founder, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low, Daisy’s Circle is Girl Scouts of Colorado’s monthly giving program. Funds raised through Daisy’s Circle provide financial assistance for girls and volunteers, support Outreach Programs and more.  For more information: https://www.gscodaisyscircle.org/