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Girl Scouts learn about forensics

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Troop 720 went to the forensics lab at the local sheriff’s department and got to hear and see some of how it all works. It was a very cool and inspirational trip and definitely sounds like a very neat career.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Abagail Sickinger, Castle Rock, “Operation Occupation”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I hosted an event, called Operation Occupation, to teach high school students how to get a job. There were employers, speakers, and lots of information and research that they interacted with. They learned things like how to fill out a resume, how to dress and behave properly at interviews and on the job, and went through a mock interview.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact on my target audience with two different surveys. The first one was given to them at the event as they were leaving. This one had questions pertaining to the short-term affects they got from the event. Some questions included, “Did you learn something new?” and similar questions to judge their initial thoughts of the event. The second one was emailed to them at the end of the summer to see how they used the information over the two months after the event. Some of these questions were, “Did you get a job?”, “If you did get a job, where?”, “Do you feel confident when applying for jobs now?”, and so on.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable through the FBLA Club at Douglas County High School. I received a letter of commitment from the FBLA Adviser, that was signed by him, the principal of the school, and the school district. A couple of officers from the club attended my event to make sure that theirs is as close to mine as it can be, while changing what needs to be changed to make it better.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project had both a global and national connection. The national connection is a website in Florida that shared my website with their company. I also contacted Gap Outlet and asked them to put the links to all of my social media on their national page. This will take a while to go through the system, but I am hopeful it will get through. The global connection was mainly through my YouTube channel, I have reached three different countries with my video, United States, Canada, and The Philippines. I am hoping to expand this outreach even further.

What did you learn about yourself?

A couple of things that I learned about myself through this project is that I am very organized when I want to be, and I am great at running events in a short period of time. I started working on my event way too late, and realized that with the amount of compliments I got about how smooth my event was, that I am good at pulling together at the end. Also, I stayed organized throughout the entire project to keep from missing anything.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The Gold Award has taught me many things. It has given me a lot of leadership qualities and skills that I will use for the rest of my life. It has also taught me to not procrastinate, and to work in a timely fashion. I will never put off something until the last minute again, because I do not like the feeling that I might be forgetting something important.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that the Gold Award was a big part of my Girl Scouting experience because it put all of the things I learned throughout the program all together. It’s almost like it tied off my Girl Scouting years (as a girl) with a bow.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

The Gold Award taught me to be G.I.R.L. by making me be a go-getter. I have always had a passion for helping others my age, and this project made me take a step to helping them. Seeing progress was being made by the people who attended, showed me that I made a difference in their lives. I became a risk-taker by learning how to speak in front of an audience, and how to talk to adults and tell them that I need help. I became a leader by learning how to find a problem in the community, what I can do to fix it, and stepping out of my comfort zone, to get it done. Also, I learned how much the world needs people to step up and be the leader for causes that don’t get enough attention.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Day with DU Women’s Soccer

Join us for Girl Scout Day with DU Women’s Soccer on Sunday, October 1, 2017. Cheer on the Pioneers as they take on North Dakota State. All Girl Scouts, friends, and family are invited! The game will start at noon and will be held at the University of Denver Athletic Fields.

Cost is $7/person. Purchase tickets at https://goo.gl/Rch9vQ using the promo code GIRLSCOUT. A portion of ticket sales is donated back to Girl Scouts of Colorado.

Questions? Please contact Trent Dunn at 303-871-3682.

We hope to see you there!

Girl Scout Night with DU Women’s Volleyball

Girl Scouts are invited to Girl Scout Night with DU Women’s Volleyball on Friday, Nov. 3, 2017! Come cheer on the Pioneers as they take on Oral Roberts University. All Girl Scouts, friends, and family are welcome. The match starts at 7 p.m.

Cost is $9/person. Tickets can be purchased at https://goo.gl/Rch9vQ with promo code GIRLSCOUT. A portion of ticket sales will be donated back to Girl Scouts of Colorado.

Girl Scouts attending will get a fun event patch.

Questions? Please contact Trent Dunn at 303-871-3682.

We hope to see you there!

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Rose Goodman, Boulder, “Protecting the bees”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Being from Boulder, I am someone who is very environmentally friendly, and a tree hugger at heart. Therefore, for my Gold Award project, I wanted to address an environmental issue. I decided to go with the problem of the bee population declining. For my Gold Award project, I created a lesson plan to fit the common core curriculum of second grade. This was important because I made my lesson plan accessible to teachers via the internet, and because it fits the common core standards, it is easier for teachers to use.  I then presented my own PowerPoint presentation, that was based off of my lesson plan, to a few groups in the community to get my message across. My overall goal was to educate people about the importance of bees and how we can help them.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by asking the kids I presented to, at the end of my presentation, what they had learned from my presentation.  The kids responded with several answers such as “bees are not the same as wasps”, “the bee population is going down,” “we need to help save the bees,” “pesticides kill bees,” “planting plants helps bees.”  I also realized the impact I was making when one of the kids came up to me full of emotion, in tears, and said she was very sad about the bees and really wanted to help them.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have made sure that my project is sustainable.  First, Sammie Reynolds, a teacher at Mt. Saint Vincent in Denver, has promised to continue this lesson plan and committed to use it in the future.  Additionally, I made my lesson plan accessible online to teachers, by sharing my lesson plan and presentation with Kristin Reynolds who is putting it on the Earth Guardian website.  Hopefully, people other than Ms. Reynolds will access my lesson plan and use it in their classrooms.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Bees are not just a species that roam around in my town of Boulder. Bees are all over the world, and globally, bees are the number one pollinator. This problem affects the whole world.  My project starts in this little corner of the world in Boulder, but will longterm affect the whole world.  Also, by sharing my lesson plan with Ms. Reynolds, I am making my lesson plan accessible for teachers all over the nation.

What did you learn about yourself?

From my project, I have learned so much more about bees. I started with only basic knowledge about bees, and then began my research. I also learned how to work with people, and how to pick the correct people for my team.  I learned that sometimes certain people are a little more of procrastinators than I am, and they can be hard to work with. Additionally, I learned an extremely valuable skill: how to speak well in front of people.  All these skills will help me in my future in going to college, and then, hopefully, medical school.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project not only opens up doors because it shows how dedicated I can be and  thus, people will hopefully be more likely to hire or accept me into a position, but this project also opens the door to presenting more often. It shows me that if I can accomplish my Gold Award,  then I can do any presentation.  It encourages me to feel more and more comfortable when collaborating with others and talking to a big group.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been a Girl Scout since I was a little Daisy. Throughout my Girl Scout career, I had been doing fun activities that involved learning and helping the community.  Each of these activities, however, were fabulous, I didn’t feel as though I, myself was making a difference.  I would work with a group of roughly 10-15 girls in completing an activity that my great troop leader had come up with for us do.  Yes, we earned badges and I felt accomplished with every badge, none of them made me feel as good as I felt when I completed my Gold Award.  I had not only felt that I had made a difference, but I had measured and proved that I actually had made a difference.  On my own, I came up with an idea, executed it, and made an impact.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My project made me a go-getter because although it took me over a year to complete my project, I kept with it and pushed until I succeeded.  I knew some girls that started their project, but never finished it.  I also had some times of self doubt, but I decided that I wanted to get my Gold Award, make a difference, and continue on.  I proved to myself that I had true dedication, along with leadership.  I learned how to be a leader and inspire others to take action.  Every kid I presented to showed great excitement in wanting to help the bees.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Trails 2000 Girl Scout Trailwork Day

Submitted by Trails 2000

Southwestern CO

Durango

Trails 2000 is pleased to invite Girl Scouts of all ages to join us for Trailwork at Overend Mountain Park near Durango on Saturday, September 23, 2017 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Volunteers will meet at the Leyden Street trailhead, with lunch to follow at 12:30 p.m. No experience is necessary for Trailwork, and Trails 2000 will provide the necessary instruction and safety tool talk, all tools, gloves, and water and snacks for the entire crew.

Waivers can be found on local service unit Facebook pages. If you are not part of these pages, please contact GSCO Volunteer Support Specialist Amy Moscowitz at amy.moscowitz@gscolorado.org for a waiver. Please complete one waiver for each participant; parent or guardian must sign for participants under the age of 18.

For directions to the worksite, meet at Leyden Street Trailhead; from Durango, take Main Street to Montview. Turn right on Forest Ave to Leyden St; take a left on Leyden and park at the end of the cul de sac. Directions.

Volunteers should wear closed toe shoes or boots, long pants, shirt (long or short sleeved), sun hat, sunscreen, and bring a water bottle and rain jacket (optional). Trails 2000 will provide all tools, instruction, water, and snacks.

Questions? Please contact Amy Moscowitz at amy.moscowitz@gscolorado.org.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Volunteer View: September 2017

Fall Product Program begins Sept. 23

Get ready to explore your dreams! The Fall Product Program starts on September 23. In-person sales will run through October 15. Online sales will end October 30. All troops must have a completed ACH formfor the 2017-18 membership year in order to participate.
Our popular S’mores Club is returning this year, and girls and adult volunteers who rock both the 2017 Fall Product and 2018 Cookie Programs will receive special rewards! Make sure your troop participates in the Fall Product Program so you can join the club.
Deadline for Bronze and Silver Award notifications
Earning one of the Girl Scouts Highest Awards is a way for girls to change their corner of the world and beyond! Girls bridging to Cadettes or Seniors this summer have until Sept. 30 to submit online notification that they have earned their Bronze or Silver Award. Through submitting online notification, you will order letters of recognition, certificates, and pins, and girls will be invited to participate in our spring Highest Awards Celebrations.
Signup for a Leadership Summit
Meet fellow leaders, have your questions answered, learn new skills and gain lots of useful information to make your Girl Scout year a successful one at a Leadership Summit! Register today for one of four upcoming Leadership Summits around the state.
Visit the MCC at a Leadership Summit to provide your feedback during our Service Unit Survey. You’ll also have an opportunity to talk with GSCO National Council Session Delegates who will represent Colorado at G.I.R.L. 2017, the Girl Scout National Convention in Columbus, Ohio this October.
Check out the GSCO Family Guide
Share this guide with parents so they can see what Girl Scouts is all about!

Download now »
Girl Scouts’ partnership with JOANN
GSUSA and JOANN Stores will be teaming up to inspire girls, troops, and volunteers to explore their individual creativity and use it to make a positive influence on the world. Through a new reward program, JOANN will offer a discount to members of Girl Scouts and donate a portion of sales to GSUSA.
Some JOANN stores will allow troop leaders space to meet and may be open to troops selling cookies in front of their store during cookie season. Troop leaders should check with the District Manager to connect with a local store and should always check with the landowner as well.
Upcoming events
Sept. 29: Sky High Ranch Fall Rendezvous
Test your mettle at Sky High by flying over the canyon on our zip line, balancing on the low-ropes course, honing your archery skills, and more at our annual staff-led troop camp Rendezvous.

Oct. 1: Girl Scout Day with DU Womens’ Soccer
Come cheer on the Pioneers as they take on North Dakota State. Tickets are $7 per person with promo code GIRLSCOUT.

Oct. 7: – Engineering Day with Society of Women Engineers at Colorado School of Mines
Learn about Engineering with a fun project! We’ll be working on badge requirements for some of the new engineering badges.

Oct. 14: Air Force Football Scout Day and Camp Out
All Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, friends and family are invited to cheer on the Falcons as they take on the UNLV Rebels. Troops and families can stay after the game for the annual campout.

Want event details delivered to your inbox weekly? Sign up for the Events email at gscoblog.org.

Cadettes complete BREATHE Journey

Submitted by Staci Calderon

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

It was an awesome weekend for Girl Scout Cadettes in Troop 4636! The girls escaped to the trees in gorgeous Hartsel, Colorado where they learned all about the BREATHE journey and loving our planet. Our Cadettes had an amazing time!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

60 years of Girl Scouting with Edna “Skipper” Hollis

Submitted by Ann Thacker

Metro Denver

Lakewood

Edna “Skipper” Hollis led Girl Scout Troop 362 during my growing-up years. Who knew she would still be leading us, as adults, 60 years later?

Troop 362 was a big troop with three different age-groups. I was in the middle. That was nearly 60 years ago. And, we’ve kept in touch all those years… reuniting the last Saturday of every July at Skipper’s rustic cabin on the shores of Lake Eldora. She left this place on Thanksgiving 2016 at 104 ½ years old. As we gather at the cabin for one last time, we reminisce and bask in her love. She was a remarkable woman whom I deeply loved and admired.

Her energy was limitless. Even though she was nearing 50 back then, she taught us to: swim, canoe, hike, snowshoe, mountain climb, toboggan, ice skate, and chop ice from a deeply encrusted mountain spring. We learned to dip our buckets in the cold, clear water for drinking and bathing. She filled our days and nights with songs, swimming, cooking on a wood-burning stove, wildflower hikes, bird walks, campfires, and scary stories that went “boo” in the night.

She demonstrated kindness, compassion, unconditional love, and even taught us to “date young men.” To this day, my best date was the one she arranged for us (and chaperoned) with Air Force Academy Cadets. She showed us nature in its authentic purity, tender beauty, raw power, and rugged grandeur…all the while keeping us safe and secure.

More than anyone I’ve known, she trusted the goodness and abundance of life. Knowing that nature is God-made-manifest, she revealed a natural world, full of miracles that live forever in my heart and imagination.

Because of her, I remember to pause and drink in a sparkling dew drop, or inhale the scent of a soft, pink rose. I hug trees, speak to crickets, and sing duets with meadowlarks. I stand tall when lightning splits the clouds and thunder rolls. And all the while, I feel her presence, sense of wonder, and joy; as I take in the awe of each moment.

She embodied all that is good and continually expressed gratitude for life itself. She stood as a pure reflection of the divine, an illuminated mirror in which we could see our own souls.

How intimately she knew and loved the One Creator! And, how generously she loved each of us!!! I’m profoundly grateful for the privilege of opening the gift that she was… and I celebrate her; for she enriched my life.

Thank you, Skipper, for being who you are… a blessing to us all!

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to celebrate the legacy of one of our most cherished alumnae, Edna “Skipper” Hollis. In 2016, Skipper passed away at the age of 104, leaving a 94-year history of Girl Scouting as a girl and an adult volunteer.  Skipper touched the lives of hundreds of girls, families, and volunteers and will be remembered for her love of the outdoors and the annual troop gathering she hosted at her Colorado cabin for more than six decades.

To make a gift in honor of Skipper, which will support opportunity grants to ensure any girl is able to attend camp, or  to honor an alum who has made a difference in your life, go to the Girl Scouts of Colorado website: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/support-us/alumnae.html 

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Alexis Montague, Castle Rock, “Encouraging females to pursue STEM careers”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I focused on encouraging girls to pursue STEM careers by providing middle school and high school girls with role models. My research showed that STEM is primarily dominated by males with ratio being around ¾ male and ¼ females. Women in STEM is a complex issue that is caused by numerous problems. I decided to focus on role models since studies have shown that by providing successful female role models, more women are willing to put in the effort for these careers. In order to achieve this, I developed a panel consisting of engineers from many different fields within engineering. They came and talked about the challenges within the STEM field and how to overcome them. The panelists also discussed what employers are looking for both in academics and internships.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project through a survey given at the end of my panel event. The survey contained questions about how to improve the event for the future and if the girls who attended had learned anything new. I also talked to many of the girls after my event to hear what they had thought about the event.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained through my high school. My school has been divided up into four different academies: STEM, BHS, VPA, and LGC. As I had already done my event at the school and had numerous teachers and administers involved, my advisor/teacher is willing to sponsor another girl to run the event with the guidance of my manual, so all they must do is choose a date that works with them, find panelists, and advertise to the middle schools.

One of my panelists is a member of the Denver chapter of Business and Professional Women. When she heard that a component of the Gold Award project was that it needed to be sustained in some way, her chapter agreed to also put on this event in the future as part of their programming.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The imbalance between the genders within STEM careers is a national issue. For my project to reach a wider audience nationally, I created a website. The website depicts the issue of women in STEM and highlights some of the reasons behind the difference between the genders.  I sent letters to 50 schools within Colorado, ranging from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs, with the information about my event and what girls learned, why they should do it, and where they could get the manual and visit my website for more information.

What did you learn about yourself?

The most important aspect that I learned about myself was discovering what I was most passionate about and discovered my voice for it. It has enabled me to stand for what I believe in and develop solutions for the problems. It also showed me that I am able to successfully put on events as a leader.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Gold Award has provided me with numerous professional skills and the ability to put on a major event. I know it will have a major impact on my ability within my own career. My Gold Award taught me invaluable tools that I need for my future career, both in acting professional and the ability to lead and develop a major event.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been a Girl Scout since I was in kindergarten. The Gold Award was the final award that I could complete within the program after finishing the Bronze and Silver. But, it was more than that. The Gold Award took all my leadership and event planning skills I had obtained through the program and pushed them to their limits, and expanded past what I already had. It showed me what I was able to achieve with the skills I had learned through my 13 years of being a Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

G:  The Gold Award made me find an issue that occurred within my community and forced me to find a solution, or in the case of my project be a part of the solution. It made me develop a plan in order to achieve the solution of providing role models so that I could pursue a component of the entire problem of the unbalanced genders within the STEM field.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org