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Girl Scout Gold Award: Cheyanne Bridges, Colorado Springs, “Cans can help”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I created a program within high schools. This program is both a recycling and donation program. The students’ empty soda cans and other aluminum cans are placed in the collection bins placed throughout the school. Once the collection bins are full (approximately every two weeks but differs for every school), a volunteer for the local animal shelter picks them up and brings them to the shelter. The animal shelter then recycles the aluminum cans for profit. I also created a program guide, educational posters, and wrote morning announcements to develop and implement the program.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The aluminum can profits will go directly to the Pikes Peak Humane Society Animal Medical Fund. In 2016, the shelter medicine expenses were $1,393,781. This amount includes $10,431 spay/neuter operations, emergency surgeries, and medical attention from cruelty and neglect cases. In 2013, the aluminum cans generated $7,573.30 for the Humane Society. Over a course of two weeks, the high school gathered $1.05 in aluminum cans. Within a year that will add up to $27.30 for the Animal Medical Fund.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Cans Can Help will be sustained at Liberty High School through the active participation and management of the student council class through an agreement made with the student council advisor. This class will continue to collect the aluminum cans and prepare them for pick up by a volunteer from the humane society at regular intervals.  The pick-up schedule is managed by communication between the humane society and student council management team. The student council will continue to promote my program by creating a class competition to paint the collection bins. The competition will bring awareness to the collection bins and hopefully decrease the amount of trash found in them. The competition will have an animal theme to promote the cause that the aluminum cans are for.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have created a program guide which was distributed to multiple schools in the community and in a different state. I have distributed my program guide to Rampart High School, Pine Creek High School, Air Academy High School, and Orange High School in North Carolina. I have distributed the program guide by email and presentation. I have emailed Pine Creek, Air Academy, and Orange High School. I have gotten a response from the building managers at Pine Creek and Air Academy. I have also gotten a response from my cousin from Orange High School. I presented my program guide to Rampart High School and have gotten a positive response in return.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I have a passion to pursue a college degree and career that helps animals. I also learned that I know a lot more about animals than I had previously thought. I learned that my leadership can help save animals in the future and the present. I’ve developed leadership skills such as communication and relationship skills.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The many presentations that I have conducted have strengthened my confidence and preparation skills and therefore will help my leadership skills in the future. These skills will help me in college and eventually in my career. This experience has changed me as a person by helping my confidence grow. It helped my confidence in presenting and confidence for making new friends. This experience has challenged me to ask for help. Asking for help has never been easy for me especially when it comes to academics or anything related to academics. However, this project has helped me see that asking for help isn’t as hard as I have always thought.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning a Gold Award is a perfect representation of my life in Girl Scouts. I believe my program is worthy of a Gold Award because it has helped me grow as a person and helped me realize more things about myself than I would have never seen. Earning this award also means a lot to me since it has helped me learn what I love most in this world. The Silver and Gold Awards introduced me to parts of the humane society I would have never been a part of without participating in these awards.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award project helped me become an innovator. I introduced a new program into a high school that links both the high school and local animal shelter and I innovated a way to make that program benefit the humane society with items high school students use every day and end up throwing away.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scouts perform in The Nutcracker

Submitted by Alison Jaramillo

Metro Denver

Westminster

Treat yourself to a magical evening with Clara and the nutcracker as Littleton Youth Ballet casts a spell over your family with its captivating production of The Nutcracker. A number of Girl Scouts are participating. Show times are Friday, Dec. 1, 2017 at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 2 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Dec. 3 at noon and 4 p.m. Performances will be at the Joanna Ramsey Theatre at Westminster High School 6933 Raleigh St. Tickets range from $20 to $36. Parking is free. Please call (303) 794-6694 for tickets or visit the website at www.littletonyouthballet.org.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Closing the STEM gender gap, one Girl Scout badge at a time

From Girl Scouts of the USA 

It’s no secret that there are fewer women than men in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields today. In fact, women hold less than 25 percent of STEM jobs, despite filling close to half of all jobs in the U.S. economy. And women who do hold STEM jobs earn 33 percent more than those in other industries—making the gender wage gap comparatively smaller in STEM fields. 
At Girl Scouts, we’re more than ready for a change—and STEM leaders start here, with us. Since our founding in 1912, Girl Scouts has introduced girls of all ages, from five-year-old Daisies to high school Ambassadors, to these important fields to help them see for themselves how they can improve the world using valuable STEM skills.
We are the foremost experts in preparing the next generation of female STEM leaders. Want proof? Girl Scouts are almost twice as likely as non–Girl Scouts to participate in STEM activities (60 percent versus 35 percent), and 77 percent of girls say that because of Girl Scouts, they’re considering a career in technology. 

It all starts with a badge. Girl Scouts has more than 35 of them—many introduced earlier this year—that challenge girls to stretch their STEM skills to make the world a better place. And because everything behind our badges is girl-led and girl-approved, we believe each badge can be an important step a girl takes to help close the STEM gender gap once and for all. 

Only 1 out of 3 environmental engineers are women. 

Meet the Water badge for Girl Scout Ambassadors.
With the Water badge, Ambassadors learn innovative ways to find, treat, and conserve this natural resource. Girls can explore the engineering behind dams and water treatment plants and how they help the environment. They might look into hydroelectricity and how they can use it to power the community and address environmental concerns. Or they could get inspired to design their own water filters or initiate rainwater collections to save drinking water. Talk about innovative! Earn this badge

Meet the Trees badge for Girl Scout Cadettes.
Cadettes put their naturalist hats on when earning their Trees badge, digging into the science of trees—from identifying different species on a hike to learning about all the ways we can protect them. Girls make connections between how trees benefit the earth and the people on it, including as components of fuel, medicine, shelter, and more. And as any Girl Scout would, girls use their new tree knowledge to take action in their communities! Earn this badge

Just 1 in 3 chemists are women. 

Meet the Home Scientist badge for Girl Scout Brownies.
Thanks to the Home Scientist badge, Brownies can tap into their inner scientist by conducting various (fun!) experiments in their own home. Girls can test density, concoct tasty treats using the principles of science, discover how carbon dioxide reacts with other compounds, marvel at static electricity, and so much more! Get that periodic table ready! Earn this badge

Roughly 1 out of 10 physicists and astronomers are women. 

Meet the Sky badge for Girl Scout Seniors. 
Seniors are doing more than looking at the night sky when they earn their Sky badge. They’re studying specific stars, constellations, and planets. These girls can learn how telescopes work and how astronomers use them to study the universe. Seniors are also exploring the world of aviation and space missions! How cool is that?! Earn this badge.

Fewer than 1 in 5 women are industrial engineers. 

Meet the Inventor badge for Girl Scout Brownies.
On their way to earning the Inventor badge, Brownies put their STEM skills to use to solve key problems. After warming up their inventor’s mind, girls come up with a list of problems they see play out every day that they’d like to solve. They then pick one they’re especially passionate about and strategize an innovative solution—drafting designs, presenting their ideas to friends and family, and even building prototypes! Earn this badge.

Fewer than 1 in 4 computer and information scientists are women. 

Meet the Website Designer badge for Girl Scout Seniors.
What’s awesome about our Website Designer badge is that girls decide what their website will be about. They might elaborate on a favorite hobby, highlight progress on their Girl Scout Gold Award project, create a digital journal—whatever their passion! With this badge, girls can learn to build a website from scratch, program, and create site blueprints and wireframes. They can also dive into web design, learning about fonts, imaging, and more. And once their site launches, girls are tasked with getting the word out about it! Earn this badge.

Just 1 out of 10 electrical or computer hardware engineers are women. 

Meet the Robotics badges for Girl Scout Daisies.
Through earning these three badges, Daisies learn all about robots, including how they solve problems in STEM fields. Girls brainstorm ways a robot could solve one of their own problems, learn how engineers talk to robots by programming algorithms, and use their new skills to create a robot prototype! Did we mention Daisies start in kindergarten? Now if that’s not impressive… Earn these badges

Less than 8% of mechanical engineers are women. 

Meet the Programming Robots badge for Girl Scout Juniors.
Juniors put their coding skills to the test when earning their Programming Robots badge. After learning about the intricacies of robots, including the sensors that make up a robot’s “brain,” girls program their own algorithms to instruct robots to move and react in a certain situation. The algorithms are then translated into a special code that girls can test and correct using a device of their choosing. Earn this badge.

Discover more Girl Scout STEM badges (and our other fun badges!) via our Badge Explorer. And this is just the beginning! Over the next two years, Girl Scouts will launch 18 Cybersecurity badges and a series of Space Science badges. We’re so excited!

In related news, earlier this week we announced a brand new initiative to reduce the gender gap in STEM fields by bringing millions of girls into the STEM pipeline over the next eight years. The Girl Scout STEM Pledge is an initiative that seeks to raise $70 million by 2025, affecting 2.5 million girls. To support the Girl Scout STEM Pledge, visit www.girlscouts.org/STEMpledge.

 

Cookie University is coming

Girl Scouts of Colorado is excited to announce additional training for troop cookie managers for the 2018 Girl Scout Cookie Program. If you’re planning to serve as a TCM this year, THANK YOU! We understand the time, commitment, and heart this volunteer role requires and we truly appreciate it. We will host a variety of Cookie University training sessions throughout the state.

Cookie University is an excellent opportunity for you to spend time with other troop cookie managers, get your required basic cookie training, and most importantly, ensure your troop’s Starting Inventory Order is well thought-out and meets the needs of your girl and troop. You can also participate in some exciting enrichment sessions, including Inventory Management, Digital Cookie, eBudde, and Sale Etiquette.

You can register for Cookie University by going to the Events page (http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events/training-events.html) on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website. If you can’t attend the training session in your area, feel free to attend one in another area.

2018 Cookie University Flyer

Packing for Impact with Project C.U.R.E.

Join us for Project C.U.R.E. and Packing for Impact this month! Girl Scouts in the Western Colorado and Metro Denver regions will collect basic medical supplies to create kits for Project C.U.R.E. Packing for Impact will have two events, one in Grand Junction on Nov. 12 and one in Denver on Nov. 18. Girls participating in both regions will get a special event patch.

Girl Scout troops in Western Colorado kick off our 2017 Packing for Impact event on Sunday, Nov. 12. Area troops will gather from 1-3 p.m. at the Girl Scout Service Center in Grand Junction to pack their kits, enjoy fun activities, and learn more about Project C.U.R.E. Interested Girl Scouts will want to sign-up for supplies to bring at https://goo.gl/YavfSG . Please sign up quickly as spots are filling fast. A big thank you goes to the Mesa County Service Unit and Troop 10065 for organizing this event and sponsoring kits!

Our Packing for Impact event continues Saturday, Nov. 18 as troops in Metro Denver gather at Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children in downtown Denver to bring their donated supplies and pack kits. Girls will learn more about the countries that Project C.U.R.E. serves, first-aid, and safety through fun activities. There’s still space for this event and volunteer opportunities, but Girl Scouts will want to sign up quickly as this event has sold out quickly in the past. Cost for the Denver Project C.U.R.E. event is $6 per kit. Please note this event’s fee is per kit, not girl. Troops can decide how many kits they would like to donate and pay the fee for those kits. To register, go to https://goo.gl/UJNto5 and choose from three different sessions.

We still have spots for older Girl Scouts to volunteer at the activity tables. This is a great volunteer opportunity for Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors and especially, to fulfill Program Aide internship hours. To volunteer, please go to https://goo.gl/ehzwdj . Questions? Please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scout Teddy Bear Toss with Metro State Hockey

Join us for the Girl Scout Teddy Bear Toss with Metro State University Hockey, Saturday, December 2, 2017. All Girl Scouts, friends, and family are invited to cheer on the Roadrunners as they take on the CU Buffs. The game will start at 3:45 p.m. and will be played at the Ice Center at the Promenade in Westminster, the Roadrunners’ home ice. Come early for door prize drawings.

Bring a bear for the teddy bear toss! Everyone is encouraged a bring a teddy bear or other stuffed animal to toss on the ice when Metro State makes their first goal. Bears must be clean, preferably new and brought in plastic bags to prevent them from getting dirty when tossed on the rink floor. Bears will be donated to the Ronald McDonald Houses of Denver and Aurora. Feel free to bring more than one bear. Let’s fill the rink’s floor!

Cost is $1 and a teddy bear or other stuffed animal per person. Cost without a bear is $5/person. To register, please email Victoria Fedorco at  msuvictoriaf@gmail.com with your troop number, number of Girl Scouts, adults and siblings, leader name and contact. Victoria will respond with instructions on where to mail payment and instructions for the day. Checks made out to MSU Hockey are the preferred payment. PayPal payments are available upon request -just note this in your email subject line. Please purchase tickets early as the rink has limited space and we think this may fill quickly.

Our event organizer, Victoria Fedorco, earned her Gold Award this past year and continues to volunteer to create great events like this for our Girl Scouts. A big thank you goes to Victoria! Questions? Please contact Victoria Fedorco at  msuvictoriaf@gmail.com.

Save the date: Pajama Jam with the Denver Nuggets

Save the date for this year’s Girl Scout Pajama Jam with the Denver Nuggets on February 23, 2018! Join us for this annual game and sleepover at the Pepsi Center and cheer on the Nuggets as they take on the San Antonio Spurs. After the game, participants will enjoy a post-game shoot on the Nuggets court, midnight snack, movie screening on Pepsi Vision, and breakfast. Girl Scouts will also get a special event patch.

This year, the Nuggets has expanded their prizes to include TWO cookie booths, giving another troop an additional chance to sell cookies after the game at the Pepsi Center. The top three troops that refer the most participants can choose from these booths or additional fan experiences.

Prices and more information are coming soon. To be notified when registration opens, please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org to be added to the event information list. We hope to see you and your Girl Scout there!

Girl Scouts honors 2017 Western Slope Women of Distinction

Thursday, November 2, 2017, Girl Scouts of Colorado honored the 2017 inductees into the esteemed Women of Distinction program on the Western Slope during a breakfast at Two Rivers Convention Center in Grand Junction. A group of nearly 275 gathered at the event, which raised more than $20,000 for local Girl Scout programs.

This year’s honorees were:

  • Carma Brown, Personal Lines Manager, Home Loan Insurance
  • Sue Conry, Director, Hilltop Home Care
  • Stacey Mascarenas, Community Development Director, Family Health West

These extraordinary women were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Susan Alvillar, Woman of Distinction 2015, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. They are shining examples of corporate, civic and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow.

The morning’s featured speakers included Gold Award Girl Scout Katie Otto and Silver Award Girl Scout Anela Cronk, who shared their stories of growth and leadership through Girl Scouting. Paula Reece, Woman of Distinction 2016, was this year’s event chair and Betsy Bair, Woman of Distinction 2014, was the event emcee.

The Women of Distinction program began on the Western Slope in 2013. Including this year’s honorees, Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 12 other women on the Western Slope with this honor.

Thank you to our Gold Presenting Sponsor: USBank and Silver Presenting Sponsor: Chevron and FCI Constructors, Inc, and to our Media Sponsor: Townsquare Media.

For further information, contact Cindi Graves at cindi.graves@gscolorado.org or (970) 628-8003.

View the event on Flickr.

Junior Intellectual Property patch workshop with the U.S. Patent Office

Earn your Intellectual Property patch and a step towards your Product Designer badge on Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017! The Intellectual Property Owners (IPO) Education Foundation and IPO Women in IP Committee invite Girl Scouts to join us for a morning of fun and creativity as you earn your Intellectual Property (IP) patch and a step towards your Product Designer Badge.

Through a series of hands-on activities and presentations, Girl Scout Juniors will explore the many ways in which inventors solve problems and use IP to protect their ideas and creations. Girls will also visit with volunteers from local law firms and corporations to learn how their organizations use IP to support innovation. Last year, Girl Scouts got to try inventions and visit with teams from 10 organizations that shared a variety of inventions.

The event is scheduled for Saturday, December 2, 2017 from 9 a.m. – noon at the United States Patent and Trademark Office Rocky Mountain Regional Office in downtown Denver. This event is open to only Juniors and is free thanks to the Intellectual Owners Education Foundation. Space is limited and this event could fill quickly.

Advance registration is required and limited to the first 50 Girl Scouts. Register your Girl Scout at https://goo.gl/3huyti Questions? Please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scouts celebrate 20th anniversary of Women of Distinction in Denver

Thursday, October 19, 2017, Girl Scouts of Colorado celebrated 20 years of Amazing Women of Distinction during the 20th Anniversary Thin Mint Dinner at the Denver Marriott Tech Center. This year, we had the unique opportunity to honor all 426 Women of Distinction who have been recognized since the program began in 1997, and awarded a very special group of Women of Distinction with a 2017 Award. The Awardees were selected through voting by Women of Distinction, and are shining examples of corporate, civic, and philanthropic leadership who serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow.

The 2017 Awardees were:

  • Advocacy for Youth – Elaine Gantz Berman ’02, Former Member, State Board of Education
  • Progressive Community Leader – Juana Bordas ’03, President, Mestiza Leadership International
  • Accomplished Philanthropist – Arlene Hirschfeld ’97, Community Volunteer
  • Dedication to Girl Scouts – Jean C. Jones ’07, Former CEO, Girl Scouts Mile Hi Council
  • Lifetime Achievement LaRae Orullian ’97, Retired National President, Girl Scouts of the USA
  • Advocate for Women & Girls – Jill S. Tietjen, P.E. ’97, President and CEO, Technically Speaking, Inc.
  • Commitment to Public Service – Hon. Elbra M. Wedgeworth ’04, Chief Government and Community Relations Officer, Denver Health

Nearly 500 guests gathered for the celebration chaired by Women of Distinction Maria Garcia Berry ’97, Jean Galloway ’97, and Arlene Hirschfeld ‘97. The evening’s speakers included Girl Scouts of the USA CEO Sylvia Acevedo, Gold Award Girl Scout Emma Albertoni, and event host Theresa Marchetta ’10.

Since 1997 Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 426 Denver-area women with this honor. More than $2 million has been raised in 20 years for Girl Scout programs by Women of Distinction.

Thank you to our Silver Presenting Sponsors, DISH and MDC Richmond American Foundation, and our Bronze Presenting Sponsor, Colorado Business Bank.

For more information on the Girl Scouts Women of Distinction program, visit our website: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/woddenver.

To see videos from the event, visit: https://youtu.be/IFyQ2LQdLyI, https://youtu.be/eC7ykrGd_mU, and https://youtu.be/1WwnPsECfWg

To see photos from the event, go to:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/albums/72157686370553442