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Colorado Girl Scouts earn Climate Change patch

Submitted by Colorado Moms Know Best

Metro Denver

Denver

On Wednesday, April 12, 2017, as part of their campaign to promote clean energy and protect clean air, Colorado Moms Know Best joined forces with Girl Scouts of Colorado to roll out the newly-created “Climate Change” patch. More than 20 Girl Scouts discussed the problem of climate change – and solutions – with legislators and Lt. Governor Donna Lynne, while bringing a gift and a request to the Governor.

As the generation that will bear the greatest burden of climate change to date – and has the most to gain by preventing its impacts – these Girl Scouts earned the brand-new Climate Change patch by finishing activities like researching clean energy jobs, examining climate change mitigation in their towns, and talking with decision makers.

“Moms are concerned about polluted air and other effects of fossil fuel burning utilities, especially given Colorado’s high childhood asthma rates,” said Jen Clanahan, Colorado Moms Know Best head mom. “We’re delighted the Girl Scouts are stepping up to help girls learn more about not only climate change, but how everyday citizens can make a difference with their elected officials. After all, it’s up to all of us – young and old – to find ways to slow climate change.”

After being introduced on the House floor and visiting the Senate floor, girls and their parents talked one-on-one with legislators, including Rep. Faith Winter, about the need for smart climate and clean energy policies. Afterwards, the Girl Scouts and Colorado Moms Know Best members draped a sash with a Climate Change patch over the life-sized plastic horse in Governor Hickenlooper’s office as a way to ask for his leadership on clean energy and addressing climate change. At the end of their morning of learning  and interaction, Lt. Governor Donna Lynne presented the Girl Scouts with their newly earned Climate Change patches. In addition to being a Girl Scout herself, Lt. Gov. Lynne is also a Girl Scouts of Colorado Woman of Distinction.

“In Colorado, Governor Hickenlooper is using programs to prevent climate change like wind energy,” said Cara Sullivan-Driver, a Littleton fourth grader in Troop 60375. “At my school they put signs up that  say ‘turn off your engine’ to reduce climate change. There are many things that we can do today because what we do now will change our future.”

“It’s foundational for Girl Scouts to spend time in the fresh air, learning skills in the great outdoors,” said Michelle Benko of Highlands Ranch. “If the climate continues to change, who knows how many generations of Girl Scouts will be able to continue that tradition? We worry it’s not very many. Our clean air is worth fighting for.”